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printed ephemera

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  • Vicki Hyde
    ... $185? ulp! It is mostly post-period, specially as the main collection it draws from was that of Pepys (who never threw away anything it seems). So most of
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 1, 2010
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      > McKenna:
      > Is that: Printed Ephemera: The Changing Uses of Type and
      > Letterforms in English and American Printing, by John Noel Claude
      > Lewis? I came across it in a used book store while looking for
      > something else a coupla days ago. Is it worth an ILL or trip back?
      > The pic on the cover looked all post period so I didn't even leaf
      > through it (short on time). A quick check of amazon shows it going
      > for $185 USD.

      $185? ulp!

      It is mostly post-period, specially as the main collection it draws
      from was that of Pepys (who never threw away anything it seems). So
      most of the early stuff is 1630-1680, with half a dozen or so pre-
      1600s items in there.

      FWIW I photocopied around a dozen pages to use for research and idea-
      generation. The commentary is a little light on detail, but has some
      useful pointers. He states that early playbills were closely based on
      title pages of printed texts -- something I'd surmised -- but the
      earliest version he had to show was 1730s.

      He's tried to give an idea of how things changed over time, so it's
      interesting to see, for example, the 1680 Order to Attend by the
      Master of Trinity House alongside the 1960 version -- very little
      change!

      Some of the post-period material could be used as perioid inspriation
      -- the trade cards form the early 1700s look distinctly Elizabethan
      in approach in font and woodcut and would make a great addition to
      any merchant marketing. As would the meeting invitations.

      The 1497 indulgence looks surprisingly modern, depsite the use of
      gothic type -- and it's always good to see more examples of printed
      materials with handwritten additions that *don't* match the printed
      font. (I keep mentioning this to our Scribes so they don't have to
      feel bad about not being able to perfectly fill in names and blazons
      on our pre-prepped AoAs :-).

      And the 1615 almanac makes me want to try out another version -- just
      wish we hadn't sold our A3 printer.....

      But the bulk of the book is 1800s on, so I'd recommend that, unless
      you get it for a reasonable price, it's worth tracking down via
      library loan and getting the dozen or so pages that are most likely
      to be of interest.

      Cheers,
      katherine
      =====================================
      katherine kerr of the Hermitage, in the Crescent Isles,
      Barony of Southron Gaard, Kingdom of Lochac
      mka Vicki Hyde, Webwright, wordsmith
      bardic arts, maps, children: http://webcentre.co.nz/kk
      Barony of Southron Gaard: http://sg.lochac.sca.org
    • Jean Hetzel
      Will the earlier edition do? Alibris has copies of the 1969 edition starting at about $13.  
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 2, 2010
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        Will the earlier edition do? Alibris has copies of the 1969 edition starting at about $13.
         
        http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?isbn=0571092551&cm_ven=PFX&cm_cat=affiliates&cm_pla=links&afn_sr=gan&cm_ite=k10538&pfxid=a_1284897668
         
        ~Eithni

        There are three slender things that best support the world:
        the slender stream of milk from the cows teat into the pail,
        the slender blade of green corn upon the ground,
        and the slender thread across the hand of a skilled woman.
        - The Triads of Ireland (9th century)




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