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Challenge update - making sausages

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  • Diane
    Greetings all, Item number 68 on my list of things to do as part of my challenge was improving my skills in food preservation. This week, my friend Rozalynd
    Message 1 of 17 , Mar 17, 2010
      Greetings all,

      Item number 68 on my list of things to do as part of my challenge was improving my skills in food preservation. This week, my friend Rozalynd and broke out my sausage making equipment and I am now within 5 lb of completing 50 lb of sausages. I taught a course in sausage making at Caldrithig's Practicum in February, which accounted for 5 lb of sausage. This week, we have continued the experimentation with bratwurst, hot Italian sausage, sweet Italian sausage, two batches of garlic and mushroom, chorizo, kielbasa, and a garlic, sage and ginger. I don't have documentation for any of these recipes, though I do have some evidence for sausage making back to at least the 14th C in Germany.

      I hadn't originally planned to do 50 lb of sausages as a challenge, but I'm on a roll now and it does make a nice thing to complete while I gird myself for the bigger challenge of continuing to empty out my basement of materials and equipment for projects that seemed like a good idea at the time. As soon as the weather warms up a bit more, I'll dig out my smoker and try doing some smoked sausages. In the meantime, I will be using my new sense of accomplishment to spur me on to dealing with the the textiles.

      Siglinde
      Ealdormere
      http://siglindesarts.wordpress.com
    • Elewyiss the Jew
      Greetings, I have several questions. How do you perserve the sausage after you make it? Is that going to be the smoking experiment? Do you have recipes? Where
      Message 2 of 17 , Mar 17, 2010
        Greetings,

        I have several questions. How do you perserve the sausage after you make it?
        Is that going to be the smoking experiment? Do you have recipes? Where did
        you find them? Is there a major difference in sausages from country to
        country?

        I had a class at Gulf Wars a few years ago on making sausage and it was
        great. Just never got up the never to deal with casing. (oooo! ick!)

        Elewyiss



        On Wed, Mar 17, 2010 at 5:42 PM, Diane <harper.diane@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        > Greetings all,
        >
        > Item number 68 on my list of things to do as part of my challenge was
        > improving my skills in food preservation. This week, my friend Rozalynd and
        > broke out my sausage making equipment and I am now within 5 lb of completing
        > 50 lb of sausages. I taught a course in sausage making at Caldrithig's
        > Practicum in February, which accounted for 5 lb of sausage. This week, we
        > have continued the experimentation with bratwurst, hot Italian sausage,
        > sweet Italian sausage, two batches of garlic and mushroom, chorizo,
        > kielbasa, and a garlic, sage and ginger. I don't have documentation for any
        > of these recipes, though I do have some evidence for sausage making back to
        > at least the 14th C in Germany.
        >
        > I hadn't originally planned to do 50 lb of sausages as a challenge, but I'm
        > on a roll now and it does make a nice thing to complete while I gird myself
        > for the bigger challenge of continuing to empty out my basement of materials
        > and equipment for projects that seemed like a good idea at the time. As soon
        > as the weather warms up a bit more, I'll dig out my smoker and try doing
        > some smoked sausages. In the meantime, I will be using my new sense of
        > accomplishment to spur me on to dealing with the the textiles.
        >
        > Siglinde
        > Ealdormere
        > http://siglindesarts.wordpress.com
        >
        >
        >



        --
        Ro'ah Chatulim


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Johnna Holloway
        There are several items on sausage making with appropriate recipes in the Florilegium. sausage-makng-msg Sausage making techniques. Supplies. sausages-msg
        Message 3 of 17 , Mar 17, 2010
          There are several items on sausage making with appropriate recipes
          in the Florilegium.

          sausage-makng-msg Sausage making techniques. Supplies.
          sausages-msg Period sausages. Making sausage.
          Johnnae

          On Mar 17, 2010, at 5:42 PM, Diane wrote:

          > Greetings all,
          >
          > Item number 68 on my list of things to do as part of my challenge
          > was improving my skills in food preservation. This week, my friend
          > Rozalynd and broke out my sausage making equipment and I am now
          > within 5 lb of completing 50 lb of sausages. I taught a course in
          > sausage making at Caldrithig's Practicum in February, which
          > accounted for 5 lb of sausage. This week, we have continued the
          > experimentation with bratwurst, hot Italian sausage, sweet Italian
          > sausage, two batches of garlic and mushroom, chorizo, kielbasa, and
          > a garlic, sage and ginger. I don't have documentation for any of
          > these recipes, though I do have some evidence for sausage making
          > back to at least the 14th C in Germany.
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Naomi Starsiak
          Not a period option, but it is possible to can sausage; I ve done so with kielbasa. There are two things to remember if you decide to do so. 1. Any seasoning
          Message 4 of 17 , Mar 17, 2010
            Not a period option, but it is possible to can sausage; I've done so with kielbasa. There are two things to remember if you decide to do so.

            1. Any seasoning will be intensified by the canning. You might not be able to eat it plain, but it will be wonderful used in stews or casseroles.

            2. It will swell to fit the jar. My first time putting up the kielbasa I cut it into pieces the length of the jar, I never got those pieces out. The next time I cut it into coins and I was able to remove them from the jar (which is the idea =D )

            Naomi





            ________________________________
            From: Elewyiss the Jew <elewyiss@...>
            To: AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wed, March 17, 2010 5:54:07 PM
            Subject: Re: [AandS50ChallengeCommunity] Challenge update - making sausages

            Greetings,

            I have several questions. How do you perserve the sausage after you make it?
            Is that going to be the smoking experiment? Do you have recipes? Where did
            you find them? Is there a major difference in sausages from country to
            country?

            I had a class at Gulf Wars a few years ago on making sausage and it was
            great. Just never got up the never to deal with casing. (oooo! ick!)

            Elewyiss



            On Wed, Mar 17, 2010 at 5:42 PM, Diane <harper.diane@...> wrote:

            >
            >
            > Greetings all,
            >
            > Item number 68 on my list of things to do as part of my challenge was
            > improving my skills in food preservation. This week, my friend Rozalynd and
            > broke out my sausage making equipment and I am now within 5 lb of completing
            > 50 lb of sausages. I taught a course in sausage making at Caldrithig's
            > Practicum in February, which accounted for 5 lb of sausage. This week, we
            > have continued the experimentation with bratwurst, hot Italian sausage,
            > sweet Italian sausage, two batches of garlic and mushroom, chorizo,
            > kielbasa, and a garlic, sage and ginger. I don't have documentation for any
            > of these recipes, though I do have some evidence for sausage making back to
            > at least the 14th C in Germany.
            >
            > I hadn't originally planned to do 50 lb of sausages as a challenge, but I'm
            > on a roll now and it does make a nice thing to complete while I gird myself
            > for the bigger challenge of continuing to empty out my basement of materials
            > and equipment for projects that seemed like a good idea at the time. As soon
            > as the weather warms up a bit more, I'll dig out my smoker and try doing
            > some smoked sausages. In the meantime, I will be using my new sense of
            > accomplishment to spur me on to dealing with the the textiles.
            >
            > Siglinde
            > Ealdormere
            > http://siglindesarts.wordpress.com
            >
            >
            >



            --
            Ro'ah Chatulim


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



            ------------------------------------

            Yahoo! Groups Links






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Christine Vogel
            As soon as the weather warms up a bit more, I ll dig out my smoker and try doing some smoked sausages   Don t wait!  Sausages are best smoked in cold to
            Message 5 of 17 , Mar 18, 2010
              "As soon as the weather warms up a bit more, I'll dig out my smoker and try doing some smoked sausages"
               
              Don't wait!  Sausages are best smoked in cold to cool weather.  Remember in most cases that they are still raw meat.  Unless you are doing a hot smoke and intend to cook the sausage at the same time it will remain raw all through the process.  A cold smoke to raw or curing meat (which last several hours) is best done at refrigeration temperatures.
               
              Christine of Marinus
                (Mundanely a fith generation German American sausage maker. Also mundanely a food scientist and chef who cringes at the thought of raw meat at room temps.)  Email me privately if you would like to continue this conversation.  I think you have a wonderful, tasty challenge!  Actually, do you have your class notes on line.  I'd love to read them.  Take Care.

              --- On Wed, 3/17/10, Diane <harper.diane@...> wrote:

              From: Diane <harper.diane@...>
              Subject: [AandS50ChallengeCommunity] Challenge update - making sausages
              To: AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Wednesday, March 17, 2010, 5:42 PM


              Greetings all,

              Item number 68 on my list of things to do as part of my challenge was improving my skills in food preservation. This week, my friend Rozalynd and broke out my sausage making equipment and I am now within 5 lb of completing 50 lb of sausages. I taught a course in sausage making at Caldrithig's Practicum in February, which accounted for 5 lb of sausage. This week, we have continued the experimentation with bratwurst, hot Italian sausage, sweet Italian sausage, two batches of garlic and mushroom, chorizo, kielbasa, and a garlic, sage and ginger. I don't have documentation for any of these recipes, though I do have some evidence for sausage making back to at least the 14th C in Germany.

              I hadn't originally planned to do 50 lb of sausages as a challenge, but I'm on a roll now and it does make a nice thing to complete while I gird myself for the bigger challenge of continuing to empty out my basement of materials and equipment for projects that seemed like a good idea at the time. As soon as the weather warms up a bit more, I'll dig out my smoker and try doing some smoked sausages. In the meantime, I will be using my new sense of accomplishment to spur me on to dealing with the the textiles.

              Siglinde
              Ealdormere
              http://siglindesarts.wordpress.com




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Christine Vogel
              How did you do this?  I remember my Grandfather canning sausage.  He used to turn the jars so the fat formed a seal at the surface.  Do you do something
              Message 6 of 17 , Mar 18, 2010
                How did you do this?  I remember my Grandfather "canning" sausage.  He used to turn the jars so the fat formed a seal at the surface.  Do you do something similar?
                 
                Very Curious (and not a little bit hungry) - Christine of Marinus

                --- On Wed, 3/17/10, Naomi Starsiak <nestarsiak@...> wrote:


                From: Naomi Starsiak <nestarsiak@...>
                Subject: Re: [AandS50ChallengeCommunity] Challenge update - making sausages
                To: AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Wednesday, March 17, 2010, 6:10 PM


                Not a period option, but it is possible to can sausage; I've done so with kielbasa. There are two things to remember if you decide to do so.

                1. Any seasoning will be intensified by the canning. You might not be able to eat it plain, but it will be wonderful used in stews or casseroles.

                2. It will swell to fit the jar. My first time putting up the kielbasa I cut it into pieces the length of the jar, I never got those pieces out. The next time I cut it into coins and I was able to remove them from the jar (which is the idea =D )

                Naomi




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Diane
                I ll answer all the questions here, if I may. This time round, I was making fresh sausage - the kind that is not preserved through smoking or drying. It has
                Message 7 of 17 , Mar 18, 2010
                  I'll answer all the questions here, if I may.

                  This time round, I was making fresh sausage - the kind that is not preserved through smoking or drying. It has mostly gone into my freezer. I did this mainly because I didn't yet have any of the curing salts with nitrites or nitrates, or fermento. These are essential to avoid accidentally poisoning yourself or others when doing sausages that are intended to be preserved without refrigeration.

                  I have done a coolish smoke in the past, but frozen the sausages just to be on the safe side. Once I have the right salts, I will be experimenting with dry cures and cold smoking (to the extent possible with a small charcoal smoker in my back yard in the city). If conditions permit, I may also try cold smoking while at the l'Anse aux Meadows historic site in Newfoundland later this summer. I'll be working up there for a couple of weeks.

                  I think all the snow is gone from my backyard for now, though more snow is expected this weekend or early next week. I know the weather shouldn't be too warm, but I do need to be able to set things up on dry ground. When fall comes next year, I will likely try bacon and ham, as well as dry cured sausages, now that I have a newly renovated area that stays just above freezing and can be blocked off so my dog doesn't steal the food!

                  My favourite book at the moment is "Charcuterie" by Michael Ruhlman & Brian Polcyn. The recipes are easy to follow and there are good explanations of basic methods. Also, it is in print and readily available through Amazon, and probably other booksellers.

                  Siglinde

                  ---
                • Christine Vogel
                  Fresh sausages can be delicious but nothing tops a good fermented Summer Sausage (IMHO).  We re edging into spring here in Atlantia and the good cool weather
                  Message 8 of 17 , Mar 19, 2010
                    Fresh sausages can be delicious but nothing tops a good fermented Summer Sausage (IMHO).  We're edging into spring here in Atlantia and the good cool weather for sausage making is well past.
                     
                    Have you thought of building a smokehouse, or at least it's foundation.  Any piece of concrete kept free from snow could work.to set up your smoker.  Heck, even throwing a tarp over the patio table and moving the whole thing off the snow free spot to smoke would work.
                     
                    And oooh,  "Charcuterie" . . .
                     
                    Sigh, off to breakfast (I wonder if I have any bacon. . .)
                         :)   Christine of Marinus

                    --- On Thu, 3/18/10, Diane <harper.diane@...> wrote:


                    From: Diane <harper.diane@...>
                    Subject: [AandS50ChallengeCommunity] Re: Challenge update - making sausages
                    To: AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Thursday, March 18, 2010, 6:27 PM


                    I'll answer all the questions here, if I may.

                    This time round, I was making fresh sausage - the kind that is not preserved through smoking or drying. It has mostly gone into my freezer. I did this mainly because I didn't yet have any of the curing salts with nitrites or nitrates, or fermento. These are essential to avoid accidentally poisoning yourself or others when doing sausages that are intended to be preserved without refrigeration.

                    I have done a coolish smoke in the past, but frozen the sausages just to be on the safe side. Once I have the right salts, I will be experimenting with dry cures and cold smoking (to the extent possible with a small charcoal smoker in my back yard in the city). If conditions permit, I may also try cold smoking while at the l'Anse aux Meadows historic site in Newfoundland later this summer. I'll be working up there for a couple of weeks.

                    I think all the snow is gone from my backyard for now, though more snow is expected this weekend or early next week. I know the weather shouldn't be too warm, but I do need to be able to set things up on dry ground. When fall comes next year, I will likely try bacon and ham, as well as dry cured sausages, now that I have a newly renovated area that stays just above freezing and can be blocked off so my dog doesn't steal the food!

                    My favourite book at the moment is "Charcuterie" by Michael Ruhlman & Brian Polcyn. The recipes are easy to follow and there are good explanations of basic methods. Also, it is in print and readily available through Amazon, and probably other booksellers.

                    Siglinde

                    ---



                    ------------------------------------

                    Yahoo! Groups Links








                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Naomi Starsiak
                    Good old pressure canning. The Ball Blue Book is a great place to get started if you need help on the steps. Naomi ________________________________ From:
                    Message 9 of 17 , Mar 19, 2010
                      Good old pressure canning. The Ball Blue Book is a great place to get started if you need help on the steps.

                      Naomi





                      ________________________________
                      From: Christine Vogel <ckvogel_23456@...>
                      To: AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Thu, March 18, 2010 11:43:25 AM
                      Subject: Re: [AandS50ChallengeCommunity] Challenge update - making sausages


                      How did you do this? I remember my Grandfather "canning" sausage. He used to turn the jars so the fat formed a seal at the surface. Do you do something similar?

                      Very Curious (and not a little bit hungry) - Christine of Marinus





                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Christine Vogel
                      The Ball Blue book is one of the bibles of an adventerous cook.  It should be right on every shelf next to the Joy of Cooking where I think mine is.  I
                      Message 10 of 17 , Mar 19, 2010
                        The Ball Blue book is one of the "bibles" of an adventerous cook.  It should be right on every shelf next to the "Joy of Cooking" where I think mine is.  I hadn't dug into it enough to notice the meat canning.  Must remedy that error.
                         
                        Christine of Marinus
                        (off to a dinner of baked garlic shrimp over rice with steamed snow peas & baby carrots)


                        --- On Fri, 3/19/10, Naomi Starsiak <nestarsiak@...> wrote:


                        From: Naomi Starsiak <nestarsiak@...>
                        Subject: Re: [AandS50ChallengeCommunity] Challenge update - making sausages
                        To: AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Friday, March 19, 2010, 10:52 AM


                        Good old pressure canning. The Ball Blue Book is a great place to get started if you need help on the steps.

                        Naomi




                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Verena Entenwirt
                        I have an interesting question about sausage making, and sense we recently were talking about your 50lbs of sausage, I figured I would post it here. I am very
                        Message 11 of 17 , Mar 29, 2010
                          I have an interesting question about sausage making, and sense we recently
                          were talking about your 50lbs of sausage, I figured I would post it here.

                          I am very interested in making my own sausage. I am also doing our groups
                          meal plan for Pennsic. My question is, comparatively speaking how cost
                          effective do you think it would be to combine the two? For example, when you
                          break it out, do you find that your sausage costs the same, more, or less
                          then what you pay for it in the grocery store.

                          Verena

                          On Wed, Mar 17, 2010 at 4:42 PM, Diane <harper.diane@...> wrote:

                          >
                          >
                          > Greetings all,
                          >
                          > Item number 68 on my list of things to do as part of my challenge was
                          > improving my skills in food preservation. This week, my friend Rozalynd and
                          > broke out my sausage making equipment and I am now within 5 lb of completing
                          > 50 lb of sausages. I taught a course in sausage making at Caldrithig's
                          > Practicum in February, which accounted for 5 lb of sausage. This week, we
                          > have continued the experimentation with bratwurst, hot Italian sausage,
                          > sweet Italian sausage, two batches of garlic and mushroom, chorizo,
                          > kielbasa, and a garlic, sage and ginger. I don't have documentation for any
                          > of these recipes, though I do have some evidence for sausage making back to
                          > at least the 14th C in Germany.
                          >
                          > I hadn't originally planned to do 50 lb of sausages as a challenge, but I'm
                          > on a roll now and it does make a nice thing to complete while I gird myself
                          > for the bigger challenge of continuing to empty out my basement of materials
                          > and equipment for projects that seemed like a good idea at the time. As soon
                          > as the weather warms up a bit more, I'll dig out my smoker and try doing
                          > some smoked sausages. In the meantime, I will be using my new sense of
                          > accomplishment to spur me on to dealing with the the textiles.
                          >
                          >
                          > Siglinde
                          > Ealdormere
                          > http://siglindesarts.wordpress.com
                          >
                          >
                          >



                          --
                          Lady Verena Entenwirth
                          www.broomstich.com


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Johnna Holloway
                          Time is another factor. It s an investment in time. I just read a review of a sausage cookbook this am and the reviewer Jonathan Segura wrote about sausage
                          Message 12 of 17 , Mar 29, 2010
                            Time is another factor. It's an investment in time.

                            I just read a review of a sausage cookbook this am and the reviewer
                            Jonathan Segura wrote about sausage making:

                            "But here's the deal: It's a lot of fun, and why just go buy
                            something in the store when you can kill half your morning prepping,
                            grinding, seasoning, chopping, mixing, stewing, stuffing, poaching,
                            and drinking?"

                            He also stressed the importance of having a kitchen aid mixer with the
                            sausage attachment.

                            Segura recommended the recipes in Sausage by Victoria Wise (Ten Speed)
                            and Donald Link's boudin recipe from
                            Real Cajun from Clarkson Potter.

                            Johnnae

                            On Mar 29, 2010, at 1:45 PM, Verena Entenwirt wrote:

                            > I have an interesting question about sausage making, and sense we
                            > recently
                            > were talking about your 50lbs of sausage, I figured I would post it
                            > here.
                            > I am very interested in making my own sausage. I am also doing our
                            > groups
                            > meal plan for Pennsic. My question is, comparatively speaking how cost
                            > effective do you think it would be to combine the two? For example,
                            > when you
                            > break it out, do you find that your sausage costs the same, more, or
                            > less
                            > then what you pay for it in the grocery store.
                            > Verena


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Verena Entenwirt
                            Yeah Kitchen Aid Mixers and the wonderful world of their attachments. Time would not be my issue, it sounds like a blast. I just don t want my local group to
                            Message 13 of 17 , Mar 29, 2010
                              Yeah Kitchen Aid Mixers and the wonderful world of their attachments.

                              Time would not be my issue, it sounds like a blast. I just don't want my
                              local group to have to pay the expense of the ingredients for me having
                              having fun :-) if it would be half the cost to buy them.

                              Verena

                              On Mon, Mar 29, 2010 at 1:06 PM, Johnna Holloway <johnnae@...> wrote:

                              >
                              >
                              > Time is another factor. It's an investment in time.
                              >
                              > I just read a review of a sausage cookbook this am and the reviewer
                              > Jonathan Segura wrote about sausage making:
                              >
                              > "But here's the deal: It's a lot of fun, and why just go buy
                              > something in the store when you can kill half your morning prepping,
                              > grinding, seasoning, chopping, mixing, stewing, stuffing, poaching,
                              > and drinking?"
                              >
                              > He also stressed the importance of having a kitchen aid mixer with the
                              > sausage attachment.
                              >
                              > Segura recommended the recipes in Sausage by Victoria Wise (Ten Speed)
                              > and Donald Link's boudin recipe from
                              > Real Cajun from Clarkson Potter.
                              >
                              > Johnnae
                              >
                              >
                              > On Mar 29, 2010, at 1:45 PM, Verena Entenwirt wrote:
                              >
                              > > I have an interesting question about sausage making, and sense we
                              > > recently
                              > > were talking about your 50lbs of sausage, I figured I would post it
                              > > here.
                              > > I am very interested in making my own sausage. I am also doing our
                              > > groups
                              > > meal plan for Pennsic. My question is, comparatively speaking how cost
                              > > effective do you think it would be to combine the two? For example,
                              > > when you
                              > > break it out, do you find that your sausage costs the same, more, or
                              > > less
                              > > then what you pay for it in the grocery store.
                              > > Verena
                              >
                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >
                              >
                              >



                              --
                              Lady Verena Entenwirth
                              www.broomstich.com


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Hastings Sanderson
                              Sorry to just butt in here, but since I actually had info to contribute. . . :) Several friends and I did a few batches of sausage (and my husband and I do
                              Message 14 of 17 , Mar 30, 2010
                                Sorry to just butt in here, but since I actually had info to
                                contribute. . . :) Several friends and I did a few batches of sausage
                                (and my husband and I do more every month or two.) As an example of
                                the comparison between buying the sausage premade versus making it
                                yourself, we calculated our last batch of sausage to have run us $2.17
                                a lb in supplies. To buy a comparable sausage from the local grocery
                                store (they make handmade sausage daily) is $3.99 a pound regularly.
                                They often have sales that bring their cost down to $2.99 a pound, so
                                it gets a lot closer, but we get the fun of making our own. In this
                                cost comparison we were using a rather inexpensive pork shoulder, but
                                its not the least I have paid for meat. When I use organic or grass
                                fed meats however, the price sky rockets. Our cost also includes the
                                spices, curing salts, casings and such, but with nothing figured in
                                for equipment or time. I do have the Kitchen Aid grinder and sausage
                                stuffer now, and it makes for a more pleasant afternoon, but its
                                nowhere near the fun of having a group of friends take turns grinding
                                on the old fashioned manual grinder I'd gotten from the thrift.


                                Praksedys Turova doch'

                                On Mon, Mar 29, 2010 at 12:16 PM, Verena Entenwirt
                                <verena@...> wrote:
                                > Yeah Kitchen Aid Mixers and the wonderful world of their attachments.
                                >
                                > Time would not be my issue, it sounds like a blast. I just don't want my
                                > local group to have to pay the expense of the ingredients for me having
                                > having fun :-) if it would be half the cost to buy them.
                                >
                                > Verena
                                >
                              • Diane
                                Mileage probably varies on sausage costs. My friend and I managed to get about half our meat for $1 per pound, and the rest for $3 per pound. Since we already
                                Message 15 of 17 , Apr 2, 2010
                                  Mileage probably varies on sausage costs. My friend and I managed to get about half our meat for $1 per pound, and the rest for $3 per pound. Since we already owned most of the spices, the only other real expense was casings. Around here, we pay approximately $3 per sausage for interesting flavoured sausages (chorizo, those with mushrooms, etc.). Things like bratwurst and Italian sausages are less, though I don't often buy them so can't confirm exact prices. Since I get 18-20 sausages from each 5 lb recipe, the cost to make things up is about $12, while buying the sausages would be at least $18. I can make up a batch in a little over an hour using my hand grinder and sausage stuffer, and I enjoy it, so I don't count much for my labour costs. We debated about whether it would be worth making sausages for feast and decided "it depends". A few batches for a small feast of mostly friends would be fine. Feeding 200, on top of all the other dishes, wouldn't be worth the effort. At the last large feast I did, I served merguez sausages made by a local Algerian butcher. I can't compete with him on price because I can't get inexpensive lamb, and he is good at using lamb casings where I just find them fussy and annoying.

                                  Siglinde


                                  Siglinde


                                  --- In AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com, Verena Entenwirt <verena@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > I have an interesting question about sausage making, and sense we recently
                                  > were talking about your 50lbs of sausage, I figured I would post it here.
                                  >
                                  > I am very interested in making my own sausage. I am also doing our groups
                                  > meal plan for Pennsic. My question is, comparatively speaking how cost
                                  > effective do you think it would be to combine the two? For example, when you
                                  > break it out, do you find that your sausage costs the same, more, or less
                                  > then what you pay for it in the grocery store.
                                  >
                                  > Verena
                                  >
                                  > On Wed, Mar 17, 2010 at 4:42 PM, Diane <harper.diane@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > > Greetings all,
                                  > >
                                  > > Item number 68 on my list of things to do as part of my challenge was
                                  > > improving my skills in food preservation. This week, my friend Rozalynd and
                                  > > broke out my sausage making equipment and I am now within 5 lb of completing
                                  > > 50 lb of sausages. I taught a course in sausage making at Caldrithig's
                                  > > Practicum in February, which accounted for 5 lb of sausage. This week, we
                                  > > have continued the experimentation with bratwurst, hot Italian sausage,
                                  > > sweet Italian sausage, two batches of garlic and mushroom, chorizo,
                                  > > kielbasa, and a garlic, sage and ginger. I don't have documentation for any
                                  > > of these recipes, though I do have some evidence for sausage making back to
                                  > > at least the 14th C in Germany.
                                  > >
                                  > > I hadn't originally planned to do 50 lb of sausages as a challenge, but I'm
                                  > > on a roll now and it does make a nice thing to complete while I gird myself
                                  > > for the bigger challenge of continuing to empty out my basement of materials
                                  > > and equipment for projects that seemed like a good idea at the time. As soon
                                  > > as the weather warms up a bit more, I'll dig out my smoker and try doing
                                  > > some smoked sausages. In the meantime, I will be using my new sense of
                                  > > accomplishment to spur me on to dealing with the the textiles.
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > > Siglinde
                                  > > Ealdormere
                                  > > http://siglindesarts.wordpress.com
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > --
                                  > Lady Verena Entenwirth
                                  > www.broomstich.com
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  >
                                • Sarah O'Connor
                                  This whole thread is making me so hungry. I ve never made sausage before (it s on my list), but I do have a piece of possibly useful advice regarding the price
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Apr 2, 2010
                                    This whole thread is making me so hungry.

                                    I've never made sausage before (it's on my list), but I do have a piece of
                                    possibly useful advice regarding the price of meat for those who live in a
                                    rural area - if you live in farm country (or within a reasonable distance of
                                    such), you can sometimes find farmers who are willing to keep an extra beef
                                    calf on the share system, or sell you an animal outright at slaughtering
                                    time if you have access to the means to process it. This may mean you pick
                                    up a live animal, a dressed carcass, or neatly wrapped packages at the
                                    butcher shop later, depending on what you & the farmer agreed to. Same goes
                                    with any hunters or trappers you might know, if you're willing to experiment
                                    with different game.

                                    Either way, getting it at the "source" is usually cheaper than getting it at
                                    the store, though again there'll probably be more work involved on your end.
                                    This isn't necessarily a bad thing, though, especially if you're the kind of
                                    person who has uses for all the weird bits & bones. (Our dog is never so
                                    shiny and glossy as during trapping season...)

                                    Your mileage may vary. :)

                                    Yours in Service,
                                    Elinor Strangewayes


                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • J.H. Grace
                                    You don t have to live in a particularly rural area. A couple of friends and I bought a 1/2 cow between us. There s a lot of meat in 1/2 a cow. My share
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Apr 2, 2010
                                      You don't have to live in a particularly rural area. A couple of
                                      friends and I bought a 1/2 cow between us. There's a lot of meat in
                                      1/2 a cow. My share half-filled my freezer. It all came nicely
                                      butchered, wrapped, labeled and frozen (very solidly frozen too). I'm
                                      enjoying very delicious meat at the moment. There's some roast beast
                                      planned for Sunday.

                                      No sausages yet -- I need to get a meat grinder and sausage stuffer.

                                      Hugh
                                      Always hungry for good food!

                                      On 2 April 2010 16:17, Sarah O'Connor <strangewayes@...> wrote:
                                      > This whole thread is making me so hungry.
                                      >
                                      > I've never made sausage before (it's on my list), but I do have a piece of
                                      > possibly useful advice regarding the price of meat for those who live in a
                                      > rural area - if you live in farm country (or within a reasonable distance of
                                      > such), you can sometimes find farmers who are willing to keep an extra beef
                                      > calf on the share system, or sell you an animal outright at slaughtering
                                      > time if you have access to the means to process it.

                                      --
                                      In collatione informatica ululans audiri non potest.

                                      Fiber arts blog: http://hughtauerner.blogspot.com/
                                      Personal stuff is at Dreamwidth: http://hugh-mannity.dreamwidth.org/
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