Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Embroidery question

Expand Messages
  • Miretar@aol.com
    Hi, I am planning to do some simple embroidery on the collars & cuffs of garb. What kind of underlining or support material should I use to stiffen the
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 4 8:13 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi,
      I am planning to do some simple embroidery on the collars & cuffs of garb.
      What kind of underlining or support material should I use to stiffen the
      fabric?

      Regards
      Sophia


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Samia al-Kaslaania
      What kind of fabric are you working on, and how much coverage will you have with the embroidery? Samia
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 4 8:15 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        What kind of fabric are you working on, and how much coverage will you
        have with the embroidery?

        Samia

        On 2/4/2010 10:13 AM, Miretar@... wrote:
        > Hi,
        > I am planning to do some simple embroidery on the collars& cuffs of garb.
        > What kind of underlining or support material should I use to stiffen the
        > fabric?
        >
        > Regards
        > Sophia
      • Miretar@aol.com
        I will be using primarily linen but also some silk. The embroidery designs will be linear, worked in stem & chain stitch [Non-text portions of this message
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 4 8:32 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          I will be using primarily linen but also some silk. The embroidery designs
          will be linear, worked in stem & chain stitch


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • james
          My wife uses muslin, not so much to stiffen but to stabilize the ground fabric. Don t know if that s any help. I think she said it helps reduce the puckering
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 4 11:21 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            My wife uses muslin, not so much to stiffen but to stabilize the ground fabric. Don't know if that's any help. I think she said it helps reduce the puckering or something like that.

            Cedric

            --- In AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com, Miretar@... wrote:
            >
            > Hi,
            > I am planning to do some simple embroidery on the collars & cuffs of garb.
            > What kind of underlining or support material should I use to stiffen the
            > fabric?
            >
            > Regards
            > Sophia
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Samia al-Kaslaania
            I don t back fabric when I do small amounts of embroidery. It takes some practice to keep from pulling the stitches tight, and that s easier when you re
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 4 3:50 PM
            • 0 Attachment
              I don't back fabric when I do small amounts of embroidery. It takes some
              practice to keep from pulling the stitches tight, and that's easier when
              you're keeping your threads short.

              I can post pictures if you like, but they're nothing special. Just a
              little embroidery here and there.

              A friend will use another fabric, with a tighter weave, for a backing
              when doing greater coverage.

              Samia

              On 2/4/2010 10:32 AM, Miretar@... wrote:
              > I will be using primarily linen but also some silk. The embroidery designs
              > will be linear, worked in stem& chain stitch
              >
            • Michelle Heitman
              ... The linen won t need any backing. Linen is nice, solid stuff, and holds needlework very well, particularly if you re doing doing those stitches. The
              Message 6 of 11 , Feb 4 6:18 PM
              • 0 Attachment
                >I will be using primarily linen but also some silk. The embroidery designs
                >will be linear, worked in stem & chain stitch


                The linen won't need any backing. Linen is nice, solid stuff, and holds

                needlework very well, particularly if you're doing doing those stitches.



                The silk...that may be another story. There are light-weight silks that

                don't support the weight of stitches very well, to say nothing of the

                possibility of them "dragging" the weave of the silk apart. (I don't know

                how to say that better.) It has, however, been my experience that

                backing a piece (whether you go through both fabrics, or whether you

                just put a backing material on after you've done the stitching) gives

                you a less-than-perfectly-desirable finished piece.



                My advice would be to specifically choose your silk and linen FOR their

                weight/even-ness of weave/sturdiness. Then you won't have to worry

                about whether or not they'll hold the stitch.



                Fiondel






                _________________________________________________________________
                Hotmail: Trusted email with powerful SPAM protection.
                http://clk.atdmt.com/GBL/go/201469227/direct/01/

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Honour Horne-Jaruk
                ... (Answering someone else s question about baking embroidery)   ... In the middle ages, work of this type was sometimes stabilized with starch or glue-like
                Message 7 of 11 , Feb 4 10:14 PM
                • 0 Attachment
                  Respected friends:
                  --- On Thu, 2/4/10, Michelle Heitman <fiondel@...> wrote:
                  (Answering someone else's question about baking embroidery)






                   









                  >>I will be using primarily linen but also some silk. The embroidery designs

                  >>will be linear, worked in stem & chain stitch



                  >The linen won't need any backing. Linen is nice, solid stuff, and holds

                  >needlework very well, particularly if you're doing doing those stitches.

                  >The silk...that may be another story. There are light-weight silks that

                  >don't support the weight of stitches very well, to say nothing of the

                  >possibility of them "dragging" the weave of the silk apart. (I don't know

                  >how to say that better.)That's called rucking. Threads (usually, though not always, the weft-- sideways-- threads) slide away from each other on their stronger crossing threads, leaving a visible gap.
                  >It has, however, been my experience that

                  >backing a piece (whether you go through both fabrics, or whether you

                  >just put a backing material on after you've done the stitching) gives

                  >you a less-than-perfectly -desirable finished piece. Good advice, if the fabric has not yet been purchased. If it has, however, and it really is too lightweight for the embroidery you wish to do:1: Get thinner thread. It will weigh less and pull less.2: Back the fabric with another piece of the exact same fabric.3: If you do 2, baste the two layers together very, very well so that you don't end up with wrinkles on one layer that aren't there on the other. If you're working with silk fabric, which is notorious for permanent holes wherever a needle has gone through the cloth, then baste along the lines the embroidery will follow, and pull out an inch of basting just before you embroider that inch.

                  >My advice would be to specifically choose your silk and linen FOR their

                  >weight/evenness of weave/sturdiness. Then you won't have to worry

                  >about whether or not they'll hold the stitch.

                  >Fiondel
                  In the middle ages, work of this type was sometimes stabilized with starch or glue-like substances. The modern equivalent would be water-soluble "fabric", sometimes available for this very purpose. Unfortunately, the stuff is designed for modern, extremely washable fabric. If you're working silk don't go anywhere near it. (I mention it only because the helpful lady in the embroidery store may.)
                  Yours in service to both the Societies of which I am a member-

                  (Friend) Honour Horne-Jaruk, R.S.F.

                  Alizaundre de Brebeuf, C.O.L. S.C.A.- AKA Una the wisewoman, or That Pict



                  If you're doing your best, and your best isn't very good, that's life. If you aren't doing your best, _that's cheating_.






                  ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _

                  Hotmail: Trusted email with powerful SPAM protection.

                  http://clk.atdmt com/GBL/go/ 201469227/ direct/01/



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

























                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Samia al-Kaslaania
                  You can pre-wash your plain silk fabrics. I don t send them through the dryer, but neither do I send my fine linen fabrics through the dryer. I recommend
                  Message 8 of 11 , Feb 4 10:26 PM
                  • 0 Attachment
                    You can pre-wash your plain silk fabrics. I don't send them through the
                    dryer, but neither do I send my fine linen fabrics through the dryer. I
                    recommend hemming the silk first. Cleaning those silk threads off the
                    agitator is worse than cleaning hair of a vacuum brush.

                    In my house, if it's not court garb it needs to survive the washer.
                    You'd be amazed how many nice fabrics can survive the washer.

                    Samia

                    On 2/5/2010 12:14 AM, Honour Horne-Jaruk wrote:

                    > In the middle ages, work of this type was sometimes stabilized with starch or glue-like substances. The modern equivalent would be water-soluble "fabric", sometimes available for this very purpose. Unfortunately, the stuff is designed for modern, extremely washable fabric. If you're working silk don't go anywhere near it. (I mention it only because the helpful lady in the embroidery store may.)
                  • Honour Horne-Jaruk
                    Respected friends: (I regret the necessity of top-posting. I can t get this (censored) yahoo server to align anything sent to me in the new fancy-schmantzy
                    Message 9 of 11 , Feb 4 10:47 PM
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Respected friends:
                      (I regret the necessity of top-posting. I can't get this (censored) yahoo server to align anything sent to me in the new fancy-schmantzy E-mail formats.)

                         Although garb fabric should almost always be pre-washed (Unless it's a multi-colored silk brocade; for some reason they're virtually never color-fast) The threads would need to be preshrunk as well before you could safely use water-soluble embroidery stabilizer. And I know, from grim experience, how hard it is to learn how to correctly preshrink embroidery silks. It's almost as bad as preshrinking embroidery wools, and that's saying plenty, none of it good.
                         I really recommend avoiding it if you possibly can.


                      --- On Fri, 2/5/10, Samia al-Kaslaania <samia@...> wrote:






                       









                      You can pre-wash your plain silk fabrics. I don't send them through the

                      dryer, but neither do I send my fine linen fabrics through the dryer. I

                      recommend hemming the silk first. Cleaning those silk threads off the

                      agitator is worse than cleaning hair off a vacuum brush.



                      In my house, if it's not court garb it needs to survive the washer.

                      You'd be amazed how many nice fabrics can survive the washer.



                      Samia



                      On 2/5/2010 12:14 AM, Honour Horne-Jaruk wrote:



                      > In the middle ages, work of this type was sometimes stabilized with starch or glue-like substances. The modern equivalent would be water-soluble "fabric", sometimes available for this very purpose. Unfortunately, the stuff is designed for modern, extremely washable fabric. If you're working silk don't go anywhere near it. (I mention it only because the helpful lady in the embroidery store may.)Yours in service to both the Societies of which I am a member-

                      (Friend) Honour Horne-Jaruk, R.S.F.

                      Alizaundre de Brebeuf, C.O.L. S.C.A.- AKA Una the wisewoman, or That Pict



                      If you're doing your best, and your best isn't very good, that's life. If you aren't doing your best, _that's cheating_.























                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Johnna Holloway
                      The answer of course would be to work up a small sample piece on swatches of the fabrics in question using the threads you intend to use later for the cuffs
                      Message 10 of 11 , Feb 5 3:14 AM
                      • 0 Attachment
                        The answer of course would be to work up a small sample piece
                        on swatches of the fabrics in question using the threads you intend to
                        use later for the
                        cuffs and collars.

                        See how it works up. Does it wash or can it be cleaned? That might
                        tell you a lot
                        about your choices.

                        Johnnae llyn Lewis

                        >
                        >
                        > >I will be using primarily linen but also some silk. The embroidery
                        > designs
                        > >will be linear, worked in stem & chain stitch
                        >
                        >
                        > Hi,
                        > I am planning to do some simple embroidery on the collars & cuffs
                        of garb.
                        > What kind of underlining or support material should I use to
                        stiffen the
                        > fabric?
                        >
                        > Regards
                        > Sophia
                        >
                        >
                        >



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Michelle Heitman
                        ... OoooOOOOOO! I haven t tried that!!! THANK YOU! Fiondel _________________________________________________________________ Hotmail: Trusted email with
                        Message 11 of 11 , Feb 5 7:42 AM
                        • 0 Attachment
                          >2: Back the fabric with another piece of the exact same fabric.3: If you do 2,

                          >baste the two layers together very, very well so that you don't end up with

                          >wrinkles on one layer that aren't there on the other. If you're working with silk

                          >fabric, which is notorious for permanent holes wherever a needle has gone

                          >through the cloth, then baste along the lines the embroidery will follow, and

                          >pull out an inch of basting just before you embroider that inch.




                          OoooOOOOOO! I haven't tried that!!! THANK YOU!



                          Fiondel

                          _________________________________________________________________
                          Hotmail: Trusted email with Microsoft�s powerful SPAM protection.
                          http://clk.atdmt.com/GBL/go/201469226/direct/01/

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.