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ISO book of kells information

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  • Rachel's
    I am working on a wall panel and I am using a page from the Book of Kells to design it. The problem I am having is finding the listing of colors used and were
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 22 2:31 PM
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      I am working on a wall panel and I am using a page from the Book of Kells to design it. The problem I am having is finding the listing of colors used and were they oil based?

      Does any one know what original colors were used in the Book of Kells and what type of ink they used?

      I will not be able to get back on line till next Tuesday, sorry for the delay in my responses.

      Thank you for your time and help

      Halla
    • Coblaith Muimnech
      ... Trinity College Dublin (where the Book is currently held) has been doing some research on this question
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 22 4:29 PM
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        Halla wrote:
        > I am working on a wall panel and I am using a page from the Book of
        > Kells to design it. The problem I am having is finding the listing
        > of colors used and were they oil based?

        Trinity College Dublin (where the Book is currently held) has been
        doing some research on this question <http://www.tcd.ie/Library/
        preservation/research/analysis-book-kells.php> <http://
        www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/122249970/abstract>. They've
        apparently identified indigo, red lead, orpiment, verdigris, carbon,
        iron gall ink, and gypsum as pigments used in the illustrations.
        It's possible that someone at Trinity could tell you in what media
        the pigments were suspended if you asked. I'd probably start with
        the Keeper of the Manuscripts, whose e-mail address is available at
        <http://www.tcd.ie/about/trinity/bookofkells/>.

        The introduction to paint, pigment, and color on the Gutenberg School
        for Scribes <http://gutenbergscribes.chivalrysports.com/lesson1a-
        paints.shtml> has some general information on period media.
        Specifically, it says, "In period artists mixed their dry powdered
        pigments with water to form a paste then scooped the paste into
        mussel shells and let them dry.. . .Watercolors and Gouache were both
        used in period but they were lumped together and called 'water
        tempera.' When mixed with egg yolk, the paint was called 'egg
        tempera' or it was called 'oil tempera' when mixed with linseed or
        walnut oil. Gouache means opaque watercolor and is made by adding
        opacifiers like chalk to the pigments." It's possible that the owner
        of that site has some information on which sort of paint was used in
        the Book of Kells or can point you to someone who does.


        Coblaith Muimnech
        <mailto:Coblaith@...>
        <http://coblaith.net>
      • Nest verch Tangwistel
        The book of kells would not have oil based paints. The illuminated manuscipts were water based so the oil would not soak into the pages. The closest thing on
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 22 7:09 PM
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          The book of kells would not have oil based paints. The illuminated manuscipts were water based so the oil would not soak into the pages. The closest thing on the market these days is the gouaches,but again they are not waterproof. Making a scroll which is not waterproof is one thing, but a wall is another. If I were painting on a wall I would definately use modern latex paint.
           
          right off the top of my head they used indigo blue (they weren't importing ultramarine yet), a bright red (minium), orange and white made from lead, a lavender from some kind of plant source, a beautiful bright yellow made from arsenic (orpiment), and a darker red. So stick with pretty much denim blue, and primary red, orange, yellow, black, white and oddly enough turqouise. Most of the really pretty colors were made with poisons so modern paints is the way to go for a wall. Last thing you want is a child licking the sweet tasting lead. Come to think of it, I am sure it is illegal to use lead paints on walls now, for just that reason.
           
          Nest

          --- On Tue, 9/22/09, Rachel's <hallarachel@...> wrote:


          From: Rachel's <hallarachel@...>
          Subject: [AandS50ChallengeCommunity] ISO book of kells information
          To: AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Tuesday, September 22, 2009, 5:31 PM


          I am working on a wall panel and I am using a page from the Book of Kells to design it. The problem I am having is finding the listing of colors used and were they oil based? 

          Does any one know what original colors were used in the Book of Kells and what type of ink they used?

          I will not be able to get back on line till next Tuesday, sorry for the delay in my responses.

          Thank you for your time and help

          Halla



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        • Johnna Holloway
          The question was asked about artist materials in the Book of Kells. I came across a book this am that might be of use for questions like this. Artists
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 8, 2009
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            The question was asked about artist materials in the Book of Kells.
            I came across a book this am that might be of use for questions like
            this.

            Artists' Techniques and Materials by Antonella Fuga
            J. Paul Getty Museum
            384 pages, 51/4 x 7 3/4 inches
            400 color illustrations
            ISBN 978-0-89236-860-0


            Amazon states: "This latest volume in the popular Guide to Imagery
            series discusses the materials and processes used in eight media:
            painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, mosaics, ceramics, glass,
            and metalwork. Within each of these categories, Antonella Fuga
            examines the range of materials and techniques that have developed
            over the centuries. For instance, in the chapter on drawing, she
            analyzes the use of charcoal, red chalk, and pastels, among other
            media. Capsule descriptions in the margins list essential information
            about the subject under discussion, and details of the artworks
            employed as examples are called out. The book concludes with a brief
            overview of contemporary techniques.
            Richly illustrated with artworks from many of the world's important
            museums, this book provides art enthusiasts with new insights into the
            creation of many of the world's great masterpieces."

            I know from experience that the series has very interesting volumes
            and that they are quite readable.
            http://www.getty.edu/bookstore/titles/artist.html

            You might seek it out at your local library.


            Johnnae llyn Lewis
            >
            >
            >
            > --- On Tue, 9/22/09, Rachel's <hallarachel@...> wrote:
            >
            > From: Rachel's <hallarachel@...>
            > Subject: [AandS50ChallengeCommunity] ISO book of kells information
            > To: AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Tuesday, September 22, 2009, 5:31 PM
            >
            > I am working on a wall panel and I am using a page from the Book of
            > Kells to design it. The problem I am having is finding the listing
            > of colors used and were they oil based?
            >
            > Does any one know what original colors were used in the Book of
            > Kells and what type of ink they used?
            >
            > I will not be able to get back on line till next Tuesday, sorry for
            > the delay in my responses.
            >
            > Thank you for your time and help
            >
            > Halla
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >



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