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Re: [AandS50ChallengeCommunity] book by and about the sca

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  • jonell
    I can t recall the SCA being mentioned in any of her novels that I have read to date but Selina Rosen author of the Chains trilogy and Queen of Denial and
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 1, 2009
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      I can't recall the SCA being mentioned in any of her novels that I have read to date but Selina Rosen author of the "Chains" trilogy and "Queen of Denial" and others I have not read.................is a very fine author and runs a publishing house called Yard Dog Press that can be found on the internet and enjoyed at this site http://www.yarddogpress.com/ I think she publishs some authors that either are presently in the SCA or have been.................she no longer participates but we knew her as Lady Selena the Headbasher long ago when once the Kingdom of Gleann Abhann was a part of the Kingdom of Meridies..........................jonell


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Ann Franchi
      To: AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, July 30, 2009 2:19 PM
      Subject: Re: [AandS50ChallengeCommunity] book by and about the sca


      Wow! Great List!!

      thanks be for copy-and-paste .... <G>

      Anitra

      On Thu, Jul 30, 2009 at 1:36 PM, Dianne Russell<cat_herder@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > ----- "Ann Franchi" <AnitraF@...> wrote:
      >> I had made this list some time ago of "SCA-Related Books" from various
      >> sources on the Internet.
      > <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
      >
      > This is the list I have collected over 17 years. I didn't write any of it.
      > (long)
      >
      > Tamara
      >
      > ____________
      > Knight Fall (was Murder at the War) is written by an SCA member about
      > Pennsic War. Mary Monica Pulver, known to us as Margaret of Shaftesbury.
      >
      > The SCA is mentioned as the basis of the society in the Warlock book by
      > Stashef (sp).
      >
      > There are many famous authors amoung our founding members, including Ann
      > MaCCAffrey (sp), Diana Paxton, Robert Asprin and others.
      >
      > David Weber's Honor Harrington series a major plot point in one book is
      > based an Honor's grandfather being an SCA member and having
      > taught her to use ancient weapons.
      >
      > Late Poul Anderson and the late Marian Zimmer Bradley, both SCAdians.
      >
      > Subject: Re: SCA Authors and Literature
      > Date: 6/14/04 8:31 PM Eastern Daylight Time
      >
      > Heather Rose Jones wrote:
      >> There are also a fair number of much more obscure authors > who are or
      >> have been in the SCA at some point. A lot will
      >> depend on what your cutoffs are for both "author" and "SCA member".
      >
      > Well, here (in no particular order) are some more obscure and not so obscure
      > sf/fantasy authors who have participated (some more, some
      > less) in the SCA:
      >
      > Jon deCles (Baron Jon deCles -- he used to be Don Studabaker, but now goes
      > by the name he used in the SCA. One of the actual founders of
      > the SCA, and a member of the first Board of Directors. "The Particolored
      > Unicorn")
      >
      > Robert Plunkett (Master Thin Robert of Lawrence, Caid. "A California Dreamer
      > in King Henry's Court")
      >
      > Roland Green (Roland de Tour Gris, Middle Kingdom. A bunch of stuff.)
      >
      > Robert Charette (Earl Leaghaire O Laverty, Atlantia. Author of many
      > interactive kid's sf/fantasy books)
      >
      > Seth McEvoy (Middle Kingdom. Author of many interactive kid's af/fantasy
      > books. Last I knew, he was writing documentation for
      > Microsoft, which means he's still writing interactive fantasy.)
      >
      > Thomas Fuller (Master Thomas Megatherium of Castle Leviathan, called the
      > Wordsmith, Meridies. Children's books, as well as stage and
      > radio scripts and shorter fiction for adults.)
      >
      > [Ruth] Atanielle Noel (Mistress Atanielle Unesse, Caid. The hilarious "The
      > Dutchess of Kneedeep" and others.)
      >
      > Katherine Blake pseud. Dorothy Heydt (Mistress Dorothea of Caer-Myrddin,
      > West, "The Interior Life". And you thought no one would
      > bust your cover!)
      >
      > I remember meeting Lester and Evelyn del Rey (who called themselves Lester
      > the Oppressor and Rachel the Oppressed at one of my first SCA
      > events. His official SCA name is Lester of Rive Rouge.)
      >
      > D.C. Fontana (Mistress Miranda Douglas of Schiehallion, Caid, Star Trek
      > author) and for that matter, Joyce Muskat (Mistress Joan of
      > Crawfordsmuir, Caid, author of the memorable 3rd season show "The Empath".)
      > Karen Willson (whose SCA name I've forgotten -- or maybe
      > don't know, since I met her before she was in the SCA) has written a number
      > of sf/fantasy TV scripts too.
      >
      > Teresa Edgerton (Morrigan Fitz-Raulf -- a number of fantasy novels)
      >
      > "Jocelin Foxe", pseudonym of Linda Reames Fox and Joyce Cottrell (Mistress
      > Audelindis of Rheims and Mistess Caterina da Montecello. The
      > Wild Hunt series. You may also know them from their writings on costume
      > history and construction.)
      >
      > Orson Scott Card has confessed to have participated in the SCA as Friar
      > Orison, in Atlantia, I think.
      >
      > From the "depends on what you consider fantasy department": prestidigitator
      > and metaphysical debuker James Randi, who attended
      > early East Kingdom events, and (according to the East Kingdom newsletter)
      > once "put a curse" on school officials who refused to
      > allow the SCA to hold archery at a site.
      >
      > There are quite a few more SCA participants who have published short
      > fiction. A couple examples: Heather Rose Jones (Mistress
      > Tangwystl, West), Russ Garrison (Sir Gareth the Russell, Middle).
      > <zzzzzzttt> Oh, no -- my brain just fried! There's more, I promise
      > you, but I just don't remember.
      >
      >> Katherine Blake pseud. Dorothy Heydt (Mistress Dorothea of >Caer-Myrddin,
      >> West, "The Interior Life". And you thought no one would
      >>bust your cover!)
      >
      > No, I thought nobody was going to notice. Since we're at it, _A Point of
      > Honor_ under my own name also mentions the SCA.
      > -D.C. Fontana (Mistress Miranda Douglas of Schiehallion, Caid, Star Trek
      > author)
      >
      > Well, if you're going to bring up DC Fontana, then you can't forget Bjo
      > Trimble (Mistress Flavia - don't know the rest), the lady credited with
      > "saving" Star Trek, as well as since then having written for the show, as
      > well as quite a bit of other works.
      >
      > Theres also "The Darkness and The Damned" by Feral Von Halstern ( Master
      > Feral von Halstern, Kingmaker, of Barony Beyond the Mountain, East Kingdom)
      > Im sure I have others but cant think of any that havent been mentioned
      > already -
      >
      > _Folk of the Air_ has a social group in the background which is what the SCA
      > might have been like if it had gone a bit differently. The SCA is
      > mentioned at the end of _Number of the Beast_.
      >
      > Gordon Dickson was bio'd in the back of one of his books. The bio mentioned
      > his membership in the SCA, which in combination with my
      > newly-finished-reading of "Warlock in Spite of Himself" inspired me to find
      > a local group. (It took me 13 years to find one but that's what life
      > pre-Internet was like.)
      >
      > Neil Stephenson's Cryptonomicon. (not that I recall it being particularly
      > flattering)
      >
      > There is a book called "Demon Blues" by a lady named Esther Friesner which
      > includes quite a bit both flattering and unflattering about the SCA. Its
      > take on Jaelle of Armida is priceless! Don't know whether she's an SCA
      > member, but she ought to be.
      >
      > SCADIAN SF/FANTASY AUTHORS:
      > * Diana Paxson (Diana Listmaker): the First Tournament was in her back yard.
      > * Poul Anderson (Sir Bela of Eastmarche)
      > * Katherine Kurtz (Bevin Fraser of Stirling): once President of the SCA.
      > * Robert Asprin (Yang the Nauseating): founder of the Great Dark Horde
      > * Jerry Pournelle (Jerome of McKenna)
      > * Lester del Rey (Lester of Rive Rouge): one of the first Eastrealm Laurels
      > * Esther Freisner (can't recall her SCA name)
      > * Marian Zimmer Bradley (Elfrida of Greenwalls): who brought the SCA
      > to the East coast.
      > * Debra Doyle (Malkin Grey)
      > * Greer Ilene Gilman (Eugenie de Bruges)
      > * Joe Schifino (Feral von Halstern)
      >
      > SCA IN SF:
      > * Christopher Stasheff's "Warlock" series
      > * Spider Robinson (one of the Callahan novels, if I recall correctly)
      > * Peter Beagle's "The Folk of the Air" (thinly disguised SCA)
      > * Mary Monica Pulver's "Murder at the War" takes place at Pennsic
      > (pretty clearly Pennsic 11)
      > * Robert Heinlein ("Job, a Comedy of Justice", IIRC)
      > * Robert Asprin: "Tambu", if you can find it, is a roman a clef about the
      > founding of the Dark Horde, set among interstellar trade
      > routes. Great story! Find an old Hordesman to identify the real people
      > behind the characters.
      > * The dedication of Gordon Dickson's "The Dragon and the George" is "Thys
      > boke is for Bela of Eastmarche, who hath, in his own
      > time, knowne a dragon or two." See above. SCA received some mention in a
      > novel named "Hunters of the Red Moon,"
      > IIRC. (Read it a lonnng time ago.)
      >
      > Larry Niven's "Cloak of Anarchy" specifically mentions the SCA as meeting in
      > the Free Park so they could fight.
      >
      > Not a book, but _Knightriders_ is a cross between the SCA, a traveling Ren
      > Faire, and motorcycle jousting.
      > <http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0082622/> I think it's worth seeing; whether
      > it's good or not is an open question.
      >
      > "A Walk In the Garden" by Christopher L. Hannah, SCA-known-as Nicholas
      > D'Orsay MacDonald
      >
      > The SCA is also mentioned in the book "Fallen Angel" by Larry Niven, Jerry
      > Pournelle and Michael Flynn. The main jest
      >
      > of the book are 2 astronauts who are standed on earth during a time of
      > anti-technology movement and are helped
      >
      > to safely by members of an underground science fiction convention and some
      > SCA members.
      >
      >

      --
      "Some people weave burlap into the fabric of our lives, and some weave gold
      thread. Both contribute to make the whole picture beautiful and unique."
      Anonymous




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Naomi Starsiak
      The first time I ever heard of the SCA was in a story called Longbourn & Pemberley Go To War , which is a retelling of Pride & Prejudice . You can read the
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 1, 2009
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        The first time I ever heard of the SCA was in a story called "Longbourn & Pemberley Go To War", which is a retelling of "Pride & Prejudice". You can read the story at http://www.austeninterlude.org/hl/lpgtw.html.

        Naomi




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Sol
        There s also a postapocalyptic novel by Steven Boyett called Ariel, in which technology stops working and magic takes over. The title is the name of the
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 1, 2009
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          There's also a postapocalyptic novel by Steven Boyett called Ariel, in which
          technology stops working and magic takes over. The title is the name of the
          unicorn who accompanies the protagonist. They runs into at least one
          SCAdian who teaches the hero some swordfighting and participates in some of
          the inevitable fighting amidst the ruins of major metro areas.

          Sol

          On Sat, Aug 1, 2009 at 2:06 PM, Naomi Starsiak <nestarsiak@...> wrote:

          >
          >
          > The first time I ever heard of the SCA was in a story called "Longbourn &
          > Pemberley Go To War", which is a retelling of "Pride & Prejudice". You can
          > read the story at http://www.austeninterlude.org/hl/lpgtw.html.
          >
          > Naomi
          >
          >
          >
          >



          --
          Argent, a sun between a chief enarched and base sable
          Barony of Jararvellir, Northshield


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Ann Franchi
          Oh, gosh, I had forgotten that one! I met Steven R. Boyett when he was hawking his first novel (Ariel) out of his trunk, at a science fiction convention in
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 2, 2009
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            Oh, gosh, I had forgotten that one!

            I met Steven R. Boyett when he was hawking his first novel (Ariel) out
            of his trunk, at a science fiction convention in Florida -
            Necronomicon in Tampa, 30 October 1983. This was actually a
            pre-publication copy - the publishing history date is given as
            December 1983.

            (No, my memory is not that good - the autographed books have their own
            place, inside a cabinet on the second floor for safety.)

            He had a box of books for sale, and was carrying them around with him
            - I paid cash, as I remember. $3.00, and 'keep the change' because he
            didn't have a nickel and I didn't have 95 cents.

            At that time, I hadn't even heard of the SCA, so I didn't remember the
            reference.

            Anitra

            off to reread Ariel .....
            Thanks!

            On Sat, Aug 1, 2009 at 11:26 PM, Sol<sol1040@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > There's also a postapocalyptic novel by Steven Boyett called Ariel, in which
            > technology stops working and magic takes over. The title is the name of the
            > unicorn who accompanies the protagonist. They runs into at least one
            > SCAdian who teaches the hero some swordfighting and participates in some of
            > the inevitable fighting amidst the ruins of major metro areas.
            >
            > Sol
            >
            > On Sat, Aug 1, 2009 at 2:06 PM, Naomi Starsiak <nestarsiak@...> wrote:
            >
            >>
            >>
            >> The first time I ever heard of the SCA was in a story called "Longbourn &
            >> Pemberley Go To War", which is a retelling of "Pride & Prejudice". You can
            >> read the story at http://www.austeninterlude.org/hl/lpgtw.html.
            >>
            >> Naomi
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >
            > --
            > Argent, a sun between a chief enarched and base sable
            > Barony of Jararvellir, Northshield
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >



            --
            "Some people weave burlap into the fabric of our lives, and some weave gold
            thread. Both contribute to make the whole picture beautiful and unique."
            Anonymous
          • Ann Franchi
            And he s still going strong - Ariel is due for reprinting, and the sequel, Elegy Beach, is about to be released. Here s a link to his website:
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 2, 2009
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              And he's still going strong - Ariel is due for reprinting, and the
              sequel, Elegy Beach, is about to be released.

              Here's a link to his website:

              http://www.steveboy.com/index.html

              Anitra

              On Sun, Aug 2, 2009 at 11:03 AM, Ann Franchi<anitraf@...> wrote:
              > Oh, gosh, I had forgotten that one!
              >
              > I met Steven R. Boyett when he was hawking his first novel (Ariel) out
              > of his trunk, at a science fiction convention in Florida -
              > Necronomicon in Tampa, 30 October 1983.    This was actually a
              > pre-publication copy - the publishing history date is given as
              > December 1983.
              >
              > (No, my memory is not that good - the autographed books have their own
              > place, inside a cabinet on the second floor for safety.)
              >
              > He had a box of books for sale, and was carrying them around with him
              > - I paid cash, as I remember.  $3.00, and 'keep the change' because he
              > didn't have a nickel and I didn't have 95 cents.
              >
              > At that time, I hadn't even heard of the SCA, so I didn't remember the
              > reference.
              >
              > Anitra
              >
              > off to reread Ariel .....
              > Thanks!
              >
              > On Sat, Aug 1, 2009 at 11:26 PM, Sol<sol1040@...> wrote:
              >>
              >>
              >> There's also a postapocalyptic novel by Steven Boyett called Ariel, in which
              >> technology stops working and magic takes over. The title is the name of the
              >> unicorn who accompanies the protagonist. They runs into at least one
              >> SCAdian who teaches the hero some swordfighting and participates in some of
              >> the inevitable fighting amidst the ruins of major metro areas.
              >>
              >> Sol
              >>
              >> On Sat, Aug 1, 2009 at 2:06 PM, Naomi Starsiak <nestarsiak@...> wrote:
              >>
              >>>
              >>>
              >>> The first time I ever heard of the SCA was in a story called "Longbourn &
              >>> Pemberley Go To War", which is a retelling of "Pride & Prejudice". You can
              >>> read the story at http://www.austeninterlude.org/hl/lpgtw.html.
              >>>
              >>> Naomi
              >>>
              >>>
              >>>
              >>>
              >>
              >> --
              >> Argent, a sun between a chief enarched and base sable
              >> Barony of Jararvellir, Northshield
              >>
              >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >>
              >>
              >
              >
              >
              > --
              > "Some people weave burlap into the fabric of our lives, and some weave gold
              > thread. Both contribute to make the whole picture beautiful and unique."
              >                  Anonymous
              >



              --
              "Some people weave burlap into the fabric of our lives, and some weave gold
              thread. Both contribute to make the whole picture beautiful and unique."
              Anonymous
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