Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [AandS50ChallengeCommunity] two documentation questions (Part B--copyright)

Expand Messages
  • Sara L Uckelman
    ... Be careful here -- the *poem* may not be copyrighted, but a particular edition of a poem may be. I would not recommend reproducing someone else s edition
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 3 9:30 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      Quoth Samia al-Kaslaania:
      > Sol wrote:
      > > For example, if I translate a work, say a poem, ideally I'd like to provide
      > > my work in conjunction with the source. Clearly, sharing my translation is
      > > fine, but if I effectively republish the entire source poem beside my
      > > translation, is that a problem? Does how I publish it make a difference?
      > > What if I scan the source and include it as part of my documentation?
      >
      > If the poem is extant, it has no copyright on it. You need to credit the
      > source that published it originally, but they didn't write it and have
      > no claim of ownership. You can publish those poem in full.

      Be careful here -- the *poem* may not be copyrighted, but a particular
      edition of a poem may be. I would not recommend reproducing someone else's
      edition of a work in entirety without first obtaining their permission.

      -Aryanhwy




      --
      vita sine literis mors est
      http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/
    • Sol
      Once again, thank you to the people who were kind enough to tackle an essentially dry subject. This is another one where I had more questions about some
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 4 9:06 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        Once again, thank you to the people who were kind enough to tackle an
        essentially dry subject. This is another one where I had more questions
        about some aspects rather than others, but figured it doesn't hurt to lay
        out different scenarios to explore some of the complexities.

        Anne, thank you for the kind advice and anecdotes sharing your experiences
        obtaining permissions. Where feasible, I am certainly willing to follow
        such an approach. And as I create my handouts, I am trying to incorporate
        specific information about using and citing the material, as well as
        providing detailed credits where appropriate.

        Albreda, thank you for the information about creating my own versions of
        items, no matter how closely they hew to the original. I am not sure that
        principle applies to scanned images, though.

        Anitra, the reference is appreciated. I had checked out the Wikipedia page
        recently, but hadn't followed any of the further references.

        Samia and Aryanwhy, I haven't dabbled much in translation yet, but it is
        something that interests me. I had heard about specific editions of poems,
        particularly translated poems, being protected. After all, isn't there a
        new version of the Iliad every few years? While I am fairly comfortable
        with working with excerpts of prose and how much could be considered fair
        use, I don't have much experience with things like poems, which are much
        smaller and therefore much easier to copy or utilize in their entirety.

        I confess, my most immediate concern involves scanning source images and
        using them in my handouts, which someday will be posted online. For
        example, with my tiraz project, I would like the reader to be able to
        compare the source image with the related image in my embroidery so that he
        or she can see how I adapted it for my purposes. For this particular
        project, I am using images from museum exhibition books. Similarly, I would
        like to produce a handout that is an exemplar of Kufic script with
        instructions for calligraphers, but also images of Kufic in a variety of
        media that illustrate the various letters and styles. I could go on.

        So then, how shall I approach this--contact the book publishers for a
        blanket permission, given the many handouts I am planning as part of this
        challenge? Use the images only in PowerPoint presentations during classes,
        but don't include them in handouts and don't use them online? And if I
        manipulate the image in some way, by flagging a specific detail or scanning
        only the relevant portion of the image, does that make it sufficiently mine,
        like tracing over a line drawing, that I don't need to worry about
        copyright?

        Thanks again for your time,

        Sol

        --
        Argent, a sun between a chief enarched and base sable
        Barony of Jararvellir, Northshield


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.