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Re: [AT_Sprint] ATS3 and portable digital modes

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  • Gil Stacy
    Vojtech, I believe Bill was searching for a substitute single package for his finals that could be socketed. I m sure Bill would be happy to share his thoughts
    Message 1 of 95 , Feb 7, 2007
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      Vojtech,
      I believe Bill was searching for a substitute single package for his finals that could be socketed.
      I'm sure Bill would be happy to share his thoughts with you directly. 
      73 Gil
    • Hank Greeb
      Best antenna array I ever fielded for Field day was an inverted V dipole @ 50 feet in the center with the ends at about 15 feet for 80 metres, favoring north
      Message 95 of 95 , Feb 27, 2007
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        Best antenna array I ever fielded for Field day was an inverted "V"
        dipole @ 50 feet in the center with the ends at about 15 feet for 80
        metres, favoring north and south, and a W8JK wire beam cut for 40 and 20
        metres at the same height favoring east and west. Both were fed with
        450 ohm "windowed" twin lead. With a HW-9 I placed #2 or #3 three years
        running in Class 1B-1OP Battery (QRP) using these antennae. I don't
        exactly remember the gain of the 8JK beam, but vague recollection is
        something like 8 dBd, bi directional, favoring the east and west coast.
        The mast was home brew from lengths of irrigation tubing, 4", 3", and
        2", rigged so I could put the array up single handedly. Note that the
        directions were chosen for SW Ohio, the choice of directions may vary
        with your location.

        At times I could "hold and run" a frequency on 40 or 20 metres, even
        though the HW-9 was putting out only 4 watts to the power meter. I used
        a Johnson Matchbox for coupling between the rig and the antennae.

        Of course, these daze my puny effort of 350 to 400 contacts in 24 hours
        would be considered mediocre, but it was fun. Folks have figured out
        how to get 500 or more contacts in 24 hours even with QRP....

        For truly portable operation, I always carried 30' of TV mast with our
        camping gear, and ran a 80 metre dipole, rigged as two of three guys,
        fed with the same 450 ohm feedline, and used the same transmatch. I
        generally packed a 100 watt rig, most recently a Drake TR-7, but
        sometimes the HW-9. This setup allowed me to handle several TCC
        traffic from the east to the west part of the United States, generally
        on 20 metres.

        The very "best" portable operation I had was during a 1970's Ohio QSO
        party, where we rented a cabin in a state park on top of some very small
        "mountains" in eastern Ohio, and there were ubiquitous 70' naturally
        growing antennae masts. The spacing was such that I could only put up a
        40 metre halfwave, which I fed with 450 Ohm line. At 70' it did a
        credible job - folks on the Ohio SSB net were giving me signal reports
        better than I received from am 80 metre extended double zepp at 50'
        which I used at home.

        Methinks investment in antennae is the first and best utilization of
        resources for a ham radio station. Second is receiver. A far third is
        transmitter power.

        73 de n8xx Hg

        Karl Larsen wrote:

        > <>Hi All, Here is what 80 Meters needs for serious DX chasing and just
        > great signals every day of the year and without any Solar Effects
        > problems. This antenna is what you want:
        >
        > Length: 136 feet center fed.
        > Feedline: 450 ohm windowed twinlead.
        > Height: At least 70 feet above Ground (better than 1/2 Wavelength)
        >
        > About 1956 there was an old Ham in Roswell, NM and he had a 80 meter
        > antenna like the above. We were on AM Phone and when he came on the
        > air with his DX100 at 100 Watts he sounded like the Voice of America.
        > Never lower than 40 DB over S9. His antenna was between two 80 foot
        > telephone poles.
        >
        > As a general rule we don't have the space for this antenna nor the
        > poles :-)
        >
        > Today my 80 meter antenna at home is a dipole 100 feet long fed in the
        > center with 450 ohm balanced cable. It is about 40 feet high at the
        > center and then slopes down sharp to about 10 feet at the ends. This
        > is not good, but it works ok.
        >
        > My portable antenna is 85 feet long and I put it up as an inverted L.
        > I have two counterpoise 30 and 35 feet long. Get the antenna as high
        > as possible. A good friend uses the inverted L and his wire is longer
        > but still not a half wave on 80 meters. He is beating me in the Fox
        > Hunts on 80 meters.
        >
        > 72/73 Karl K5DI
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