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RE: [AT_Sprint] OT- Flux remover

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  • Rob May
    We use this at work: http://www.hmcelectronics.com/cgi-bin/scripts/product/5700-0019/ Expensive, but you don t have to use very much and it leaves a very clean
    Message 1 of 14 , Aug 9, 2007
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      We use this at work:
      http://www.hmcelectronics.com/cgi-bin/scripts/product/5700-0019/
      Expensive, but you don't have to use very much and it leaves a very clean
      board. Also uses CFC's so it's not environmentally friendly (in fact the
      solvent in it is being phased out). I find that I rarely need to use flux
      remover and don't have any at home. The can we have at work is several
      years old.
      Rob
      NV5E

      >From: "Jim Fraser" <jimf53@...>
      >Reply-To: AT_Sprint@yahoogroups.com
      >To: AT_Sprint@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: [AT_Sprint] Re: Build problems at TP1 on ATS-3a
      >Date: Thu, 09 Aug 2007 16:45:38 -0000
      >
      >This is a bit off your topic, but I was wondering how you de-fluxed
      >your ATS-3A board? In the past I did not worry about the flux residue
      >much, but in recent projects I have made some attempts to cleanup the
      >solder flux. I have tried a commercial product, an acetone-based nail
      >polish remover and isopropyl alcohol. All just seem to leave a sticky
      >mess all over the board. Any tips would be appreciated.
      >
      >73
      >
      >Jim K6JF
      >

      _________________________________________________________________
      A new home for Mom, no cleanup required. All starts here.
      http://www.reallivemoms.com?ocid=TXT_TAGHM&loc=us
    • Mark Brueggemann
      ... Something I find very effective is automotive brake cleaner, $2 a large can on sale. It will attack some types of plastic so you have to be careful, but
      Message 2 of 14 , Aug 9, 2007
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        --- Jim Fraser <jimf53@...> wrote:

        > wondering how you de-fluxed your ATS-3A board?

        Something I find very effective is automotive brake cleaner,
        $2 a large can on sale. It will attack some types of plastic so
        you have to be careful, but it's an excellent flux cutter
        and degreaser, and leaves no residue. I use it with all
        of my electronics work.



        Mark K5LXP
        Albuquerque, NM
      • Jim Fraser
        Thanks for the feedback guys. Jim K6JF
        Message 3 of 14 , Aug 9, 2007
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          Thanks for the feedback guys.

          Jim K6JF
        • Jim Fraser
          Tonight I soldered up the second of two zero beat indicator boards I had bought, but this time I used some of the .020 solder I bought for a recent
          Message 4 of 14 , Aug 9, 2007
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            Tonight I soldered up the second of two zero beat indicator boards I
            had bought, but this time I used some of the .020 solder I bought for a
            recent surface-mount project. The second board was virtually flux free
            compared to the first board where I had used .032 solder. I think I
            found my solution!

            Looking forward to getting to work on the ATS-3B!

            72/73 de Jim K6JF
          • Bruce Beford
            ... I ... for a ... free ... Yes, Jim. I find that for most people, the .020 (or smaller) solder is much easier to control the amount applied. It makes for as
            Message 5 of 14 , Aug 10, 2007
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              --- In AT_Sprint@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Fraser" <jimf53@...> wrote:
              >
              > Tonight I soldered up the second of two zero beat indicator boards
              I
              > had bought, but this time I used some of the .020 solder I bought
              for a
              > recent surface-mount project. The second board was virtually flux
              free
              > compared to the first board where I had used .032 solder. I think I
              > found my solution!
              >
              > Looking forward to getting to work on the ATS-3B!
              >
              > 72/73 de Jim K6JF
              >
              Yes, Jim. I find that for most people, the .020 (or smaller) solder
              is much easier to control the amount applied. It makes for as much
              neater finished project. This is especially true for SMT work. Since
              goind to .020 several years ago, I only use my .031 for 'heavy duty
              applications like cable connectors and the like. ALL pc board work
              here, thru-hole or SMT is done with .020 or smaller.

              Also, for those of you who frequent hamfests- If you don't already
              have a lifetime supply of smaller guage solder- It would be good to
              keep your eyes open in the flea market areas for good deals on rolls
              of solder. As Steve's recent experience with Mouser shows, you -don't-
              want to have to pay retail prices for it. At one local hamfest a
              couple of years ago, I was able to buy several rolls of .020 and
              smaller for cheap.

              72/73,
              Bruce N1RX
            • ab9io
              FB on that Jim! I actually finished my 3a this afternoon with the winding of the 80m coils. Boy, are my hands sore! ;) Mine actually receives quite well on
              Message 6 of 14 , Aug 11, 2007
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                FB on that Jim!

                I actually finished my 3a this afternoon with the winding of the 80m
                coils. Boy, are my hands sore! ;) Mine actually receives quite well
                on 20m so far and the frequency announcement is spot-on. I still have
                the alignment stage to go (and casing), but everything is working out
                well.

                GL,

                Tony, AB9IO
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