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Re: {ATLanta Leavers} Re: Indian man with 39 wives, 94 children and 33 grandchildren

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  • Tom Verner
    The article didn t say, but it was implying that his family is one of 399 other families (not individuals).   They are definitely Takers as they are
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 1 11:07 AM
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      The article didn't say, but it was implying that his family is one of 399 other families (not individuals).
       
      They are definitely Takers as they are Apopcalyptic Christians and are similar to the Fundamentalist LDS and the Quiverfuls, both of which have the same attitude of "if you can't beat them, outnumber them."
       
      Tom V

      --- On Fri, 2/25/11, allbeefpatty1969 <allbeefpatty1969@...> wrote:


      From: allbeefpatty1969 <allbeefpatty1969@...>
      Subject: {ATLanta Leavers} Re: Indian man with 39 wives, 94 children and 33 grandchildren
      To: ATLeavers@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Friday, February 25, 2011, 8:26 PM


       



      How many of those 400 families are his?

      --- In ATLeavers@yahoogroups.com, "ToddD" <gooseboy1@...> wrote:
      >
      > The best part of this article is the last paragraph:
      >
      > http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/india/8340679/Indian-man-with-39-wives-94-children-and-33-grandchildren.html
      >
      > Is he a Leaver or a Taker?
      >
      > Todd
      >











      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • winn2212
      In a vast and remote desert region of North American historically known as the despablado, a man once lived who was also known to have begat a large family,
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 1 9:18 PM
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        In a vast and remote desert region of North American historically known as the despablado, a man once lived who was also known to have begat a large family, though not so large as the man referred to in your post.

        Documentation on the extent of this man's progeny is limited, but he was known to have had a number of wives (though not all of them at once), many children - 58 is oft quoted - and a correspondingly large number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren. This man, Senor Luna, was born around 1839 and passed on in 1947, having lived 108 years.

        For most of his life he lived in a modest dwelling north of the Rio Grande, it being maybe 4 1/2 - 5 miles as the crow flies from the nearest point on the river. His old home stands today, about midway along a dirt road, far from human habitation now as it was then (I first visited the remains more than 50 years ago; today the road is wider and not quite so rough).

        One of the remarkable things about Mr. Luna is the fact that he lived right along one of the trails the Comanche used on their annual treks to and from Mexico. Each year, on the first full moon after the autumnal equinox, the Comanche would come from their vast homelands on the southern plains and go raiding into Mexico, often killing with little hesitation, kidnapping young women and children, and stealing horses and plunder. The main branches of their trails remained quite visible year-round, littered with bones of people and livestock that could not endure the journey.
        Yet throughout Mr. Luna's younger years along Alamo draw, he remained unmolested - a tribute to his remarkable diplomacy.

        In the event anyone would like to see them, I have placed an image of Mr. Luna, and one of his home, on my web server at the following address:

        http://www.willwinn.net/misterluna.html

        Note that there is no web site associated with the address.


        All good unto you,

        Will
      • winn2212
        As to the ethical aspect of the behavior of the Indian man, we have little information by which to make such an evaluation, but what we do have is notable
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 4 8:26 AM
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          As to the ethical aspect of the behavior of the Indian man, we have little information by which to make such an evaluation, but what we do have is notable enough that it prompted reportage of it.

          Both the Indian man, Mr. Chana, and the man I mentioned, Mr. Luna, have demonstrated a particular unusualness in behavior, in that they procreated more prolifically than usual for their time and place. If usual behavior is regarded as being partially good and partially bad, then unusual behavior may also be regarded as good or bad, depending on whether the behavior is found more harmful than usual, or less harmful than usual.

          We know that Mr. Chana lives in a region that, sadly, is known for vast numbers of people who report living in unsatisfactory conditions, often suffering correspondingly poor quality of life. You may well have seen or experienced the same elsewhere, perhaps even where you are. In trying to discern the origins of these circumstances, many of us naturally wonder about Mr. Chana's evaluation of the consequences of his actions.

          In the case of Mr. Luna, some of us do the same. For any of you unfamiliar with life in the desert, it may be helpful to consider that deserts have tended to be unpopulous when it comes to human beings, and to consider whether the reasons for this are incidental or due to aspects related to well-being.

          If there is a place that is suitable for human habitation, anyone living there may benefit from carefully considering the consequences of any mental or physical action they might take. When young and not yet pubertal, I was surrounded by people who gave little consideration to the consequences of procreation, and in fact encouraged it or were even critical of those who had been pubertal for some time and had not engaged in sexual intercourse. Yet finding certain sufferings and loss apparent in people I encountered, I considered the origins of these phenomena, and in so doing I found that procreation on my part would either perpetuate or increase them.

          Based on these considerations, I decided not to engage in conjugal living, and to abstain from procreation as long as I found that it would produce suffering and loss, for I also knew the absence of these things.

          Our limited reportage on Mr. Chana also states that he heads a following who believe that they will soon be ruling the world. If so, this is unfortunate, as belief is the way of delusion, and those who attempt to rule find only deception, omnipotence and freedom coming as one. May Mr. Chana, his family, and his followers soon find liberation from any such unwholeness as may afflict them.


          Will
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