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Group Description

ATA SOUTH SLAVIC LANGUAGES INITIATIVE
A group for - and limited to - translators and interpreters of South Slavic Languages into English and English into South Slavic Languages (Bosnian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Macedonian, Montenegrin, Serbian, Slovenian).


After successfully establishing Croatian-English and English-Croatian within the American Translators Association (ATA) Certification Program, the volunteer effort to establish separate translation certifications for Bosnian and Serbian into and from English continues.


This list is a forum for discussing the initiative and related topics. Please provide your full name and language pair when asking to join. Thank you!


For general information about ATA, please see www.atanet.org.
For more information about the ATA certification program, please see www.atanet.org/certification.
You'll find links there to detailed information about taking the certification exam.


ABOUT THIS LIST (ADMIN):
Membership is subject to approval (but theoretically open to all interested translators and interpreters working in South Slavic Languages).

The list is not moderated.
E-mail attachments are not permitted.
Posting in English is encouraged.


PLEASE, *NO* DISCUSSION OF:
ATA exam passages.
ATA policies and politics (unless relevant to the certification program).
U.S., regional or world politics (unless directly relevant to established topics).
The user acknowledges and accepts these terms by joining the list. The moderator reserves the right to delete offending messages, and to terminate membership of anyone who does not comply with these terms.

Group Information

Group Settings

  • This is a restricted group.
  • Attachments are not permitted.
  • Members cannot hide email address.
  • Listed in Yahoo Groups directory.
  • Membership requires approval.
  • Messages are not moderated.
  • All members can post messages.

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