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Ever seen how a country copes when oil runs out?

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  • Aaron Charles
    I would recommend the viewing of the following documentary. Its called The Power of Community - How Cuba Survived Peak Oil .
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 1, 2006
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      I would recommend the viewing of the following documentary. Its called
      'The Power of Community - How Cuba Survived Peak Oil'.
      http://www.communitysolution.org/cuba.html Simply brilliant. Funny how
      everyone is focussed on energy shortages when the first issue you face
      in a liquid fuel deficient world is lack of food. Regards Aaron
      Edmonds (www.australianuts.com)
    • James Ward
      I have a copy of this documentary and Adelaide Peak Oil (ASPO-Adelaide) will be organising public screenings in the very near future. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED,
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 3, 2006
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        I have a copy of this documentary and Adelaide Peak Oil (ASPO-Adelaide)
        will be organising public screenings in the very near future. HIGHLY
        RECOMMENDED, especially if you've just watched something depressing
        like End of Suburbia... Very inspiring and gives one a great sense of
        hope. In fact it helped me frame Peak Oil in quite a positive context
        (post-peak society may well turn out better than current Western
        society with the stress of the infinite growth paradigm).

        Aaron is right - food production should be considered with far higher
        priority than most other energy uses. Localised food production (eg
        veggie gardening) is less energy-intensive than conventional
        agriculture, that involves large transportation of fertilisers,
        pesticides and produce. "The Power of Community" illustrates the
        importance of community & family in the transition to a localised
        barter-trade. So many solutions become obvious when we start to re-
        address our current society's addiction to private ownership of stuff,
        and personal space (eg car pooling and shared ownership of property are
        great ways to reduce per-capita dependence on energy but they require a
        more communal spirit than currently exists in suburban Australia).

        Top stuff! Thanks Aaron.

        --- In ASPO_Oz_YoungProf@yahoogroups.com, "Aaron Charles"
        <benaring@...> wrote:
        >
        > I would recommend the viewing of the following documentary. Its called
        > 'The Power of Community - How Cuba Survived Peak Oil'.
        > http://www.communitysolution.org/cuba.html Simply brilliant. Funny how
        > everyone is focussed on energy shortages when the first issue you face
        > in a liquid fuel deficient world is lack of food. Regards Aaron
        > Edmonds (www.australianuts.com)
        >
      • Simone Mercer
        Hey all, I put my hand up now for a screening of the Power of Community documentary - my interest is peaked! Food production is a high priority. Firstly, I
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 3, 2006
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          Hey all,

          I put my hand up now for a screening of the Power of Community documentary - my
          interest is peaked! Food production is a high priority.

          Firstly, I have been meaning to grab a minute for a while to add my two cents
          on
          this matter. If each of us were to look at our 'oil footprint' (think of it as
          one aspect of our ecological footprint) we could apportion our direct and
          indirect oil use and look at them as percentages. We usually think of our oil
          use simply as what we put in our vehicles and forget to include the intrinisic
          oil use embodied in every product we consume. I would be interested to see
          such an analysis as I think that our indirect oil footprints are likely to be
          much larger than our direct oil footprints. I'm not sure, but it seems to me
          that a big proportion of our indirect oil footprint could be contributed to
          food consumption. In the same way that products that we consume embody
          different amounts of water, different products embody different amounts of oil
          expenditure. Obviously a person who buys food products which are predominantly
          highly processed and packaged, and almost all from overseas, would have a much
          larger embodied oil footprint than a person who buys all locally grown fresh
          produce and very few imported products. So even if you can't grow a veggie
          patch (a valiant effort James!), simply choosing to buy less of the over
          processed, over packaged, and highly transported products that dominate our
          supermarket shelves would reduce your embodied oil footprint. Aaron and James
          are right in suggesting that food security will be very important as peak oil
          starts to bite.

          Secondly, I was interested in Aarons posting for two reasons. Obviously the
          Power of Community docco but also because it prompted me to find out just what
          australianuts is! Great website and congratulations Aaron for choosing to farm
          sustainably and discovering a fascinating native crop. Who new that nuts could
          be related to peak oil?

          Cheers,

          Simone


          Quoting James Ward <james.ward@...>:

          > I have a copy of this documentary and Adelaide Peak Oil (ASPO-Adelaide)
          > will be organising public screenings in the very near future. HIGHLY
          > RECOMMENDED, especially if you've just watched something depressing
          > like End of Suburbia... Very inspiring and gives one a great sense of
          > hope. In fact it helped me frame Peak Oil in quite a positive context
          > (post-peak society may well turn out better than current Western
          > society with the stress of the infinite growth paradigm).
          >
          > Aaron is right - food production should be considered with far higher
          > priority than most other energy uses. Localised food production (eg
          > veggie gardening) is less energy-intensive than conventional
          > agriculture, that involves large transportation of fertilisers,
          > pesticides and produce. "The Power of Community" illustrates the
          > importance of community & family in the transition to a localised
          > barter-trade. So many solutions become obvious when we start to re-
          > address our current society's addiction to private ownership of stuff,
          > and personal space (eg car pooling and shared ownership of property are
          > great ways to reduce per-capita dependence on energy but they require a
          > more communal spirit than currently exists in suburban Australia).
          >
          > Top stuff! Thanks Aaron.
          >
          > --- In ASPO_Oz_YoungProf@yahoogroups.com, "Aaron Charles"
          > <benaring@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > I would recommend the viewing of the following documentary. Its called
          > > 'The Power of Community - How Cuba Survived Peak Oil'.
          > > http://www.communitysolution.org/cuba.html Simply brilliant. Funny how
          > > everyone is focussed on energy shortages when the first issue you face
          > > in a liquid fuel deficient world is lack of food. Regards Aaron
          > > Edmonds (www.australianuts.com)
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • James Ward
          We should organise a screening of the docco at Flinders, one evening perhaps. As far as direct vs indirect use of oil, check out Oil use in australia , a PDF
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 3, 2006
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            We should organise a screening of the docco at Flinders, one evening
            perhaps.

            As far as direct vs indirect use of oil, check out "Oil use in
            australia", a PDF in the Files section of this website. I put it
            together using data from ABARE and the ABS. The bulk of our oil goes
            towards transport. Things like agriculture, mining, manufacturing etc
            use a reasonable chunk of oil, but when you compare it to the oil
            required to TRANSPORT those commodities (as well as transporting people
            to and from work in the whole process), you see it's the transport that
            is the real killer. There may well continue to be enough oil to produce
            the food and manufactured goods, and enough energy to package them, but
            you would need a LOT of people on bikes towing trailers to make up for
            all those big trucks...

            Hence the need to re-localise food production, manufacturing, etc.
          • blimey_riley
            Hey James, I think Simone s absolutely right about the oil footprint idea. Just classifying oil use as transport or manufacturing doesn t tell the whole
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 6, 2006
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              Hey James,
              I think Simone's absolutely right about the oil footprint idea. Just
              classifying oil use as 'transport' or 'manufacturing' doesn't tell
              the whole story. You touched on this by noting that the fuel used in
              transporting people to and from work is part of the oil embodied in
              the products we buy. Transporting them to the shops is another part.
              But that doesn't tell you the whole story re the embodied oil, or
              embodied energy for that matter, in consumer goods. Consider the
              rear view mirrors for the Ford F250 ute, which as you know I have an
              an unhealthy amount of knowledge of. Each mirror is made up of over
              100 components, I can't remember the exact number. The arms that hold
              the mirror off the vehicle are made of steel tubes. The the steel
              itself is made of iron ore from Western Australia. Now, ignoring the
              oil involved in getting the ore out of the ground, lets follow the
              path of that material to its end user. The ore is transported from
              WA to Whyalla to be made into steel sheet, which is then transported
              to a tube rolling factory in Melbourne, then, as tubes,trucked to a
              Melbourne plating plant to be zinc galvanised. Then it's trucked from
              Melbourne to southern Adelaide to be processed into the length &
              shape to fit into the mirrors, then its trucked to a spray shop in
              northern Adelaide to be coated, before being trucked back to the
              factory in southern Adelaide to be assembled into the mirrors. The
              mirrors are then trucked to Melbourne, where they are put on a ship
              and taken to Kentucky in the good ole USA. In Kentucky the mirrors
              are put onto the F250. Consider also that up to this stage, the
              mirrors, steel tubes and all the other components have been in
              different packaging for each journey they've taken. If it's reusable
              packaging it's often trucked back empty to where it came from. If
              it's not reusable, well then it's a whole other component you have to
              consider the supply chain for. Anyway, from the plant in Kentucky the
              F250s are transported by truck to distributors in various states,
              from where they are transported, by truck again, to individual
              dealers, where the customer finally picks up his new 'pick up',
              before he has to start putting 20 L of fuel in it for each 100 km he
              wants to drive it on his daily journeys from his dormitory burb to
              the mall. Just consider, some F250s end up in Adelaide, in which case
              those steel tubes have done a world tour that most of us would be
              envious of. Anyway, the point is the amount of embodied oil in those
              steel tubes by the time they get to the customer. And they're only
              one of maybe 20,000 components in the whole vehicle. Perhaps that
              gives you an indication of how much oil is embodied in our cars
              before we actually start driving them. The same applies to every
              other manufacured product or highly processed & packaged foodstuff.
              That's why your figures show transport to be such a large part of the
              nation's oil budget. It's not so much about moving people about, as
              all the transport involved in the stuff they buy. So, Simone's
              right. We all tend to think that we have to just use less petrol in
              our cars to delay the oil peak or protect ourselves from it. But
              really we need to buy altogether less stuff, which means we have to
              have much less economic activity, which, the way things stand at the
              moment, means a great big economic recession. Is it any wonder I got
              out of the manufacturing industry?

              Cheers,

              Graham.

              --- In ASPO_Oz_YoungProf@yahoogroups.com, "James Ward"
              <james.ward@...> wrote:
              >
              > We should organise a screening of the docco at Flinders, one
              evening
              > perhaps.
              >
              > As far as direct vs indirect use of oil, check out "Oil use in
              > australia", a PDF in the Files section of this website. I put it
              > together using data from ABARE and the ABS. The bulk of our oil
              goes
              > towards transport. Things like agriculture, mining, manufacturing
              etc
              > use a reasonable chunk of oil, but when you compare it to the oil
              > required to TRANSPORT those commodities (as well as transporting
              people
              > to and from work in the whole process), you see it's the transport
              that
              > is the real killer. There may well continue to be enough oil to
              produce
              > the food and manufactured goods, and enough energy to package them,
              but
              > you would need a LOT of people on bikes towing trailers to make up
              for
              > all those big trucks...
              >
              > Hence the need to re-localise food production, manufacturing, etc.
              >
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