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Connections

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  • mostrepeted
    So, in light of my recent discovery that I had been posting my msg s on the DSGN-101 yahoo groups forum rather than the 21/24 I decided to copy/paste those
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 3, 2008
      So, in light of my recent discovery that I had been posting my msg's
      on the DSGN-101 yahoo groups forum rather than the 21/24 I decided to
      copy/paste those msg's to here! LOL

      -----

      Anyone having issues coming up with connectors to incorporate into their
      designs? Until now I've been drilling and gluing my network of
      materials onto the frame, soldiering, and using thread and wire. I
      don't believe these connections are considered a "connective language
      which will add another layer to your design language". Any ideas
      people? I'll let everyone know if I make any groundbreaking
      discoveries. Thx ~Pete

      -----

      (a response from Nestor)

      Pete,

      Look underneath your car (older car) hood.

      for inspiration. Almost everything there is connected

      without welding or soldering. Everything there is designed

      to come apart and be replaced.

      Nestor

      -----

      (my reply)

      Nestor,

      I don't have a car anymore but I know the ins-n-outs of one pretty
      well. Here's what I came up with. I went to Chan's Hobby shop and
      bought a ton of brass componentry incl; C-beam, L-beam, circular brass
      tubing, and brass sheet metal (Also, I'm in need of very small screws,
      tack nails do not have the strength that I need for mounting my
      connectors; ANY ideas for finding them in the city?). Anyways, I'm
      using the C-beam as the hardware that keeps the frame together so I
      can eliminate glue/strength issues in the frame. The L-beam I havn't
      found a use for yet. The sheet metal I am cutting into 3/16th strips
      and shaping my own connectors that are as close to scale as I can get
      and are very similar in design to conduit mounting brackets. I'm also
      cutting 3/16th length sections of brass tubing which I use to
      reinforce the connectors and then pass my 18 gauge steel wire through.
      I did use a little solder though within the connectors, not very
      visible however. I don't have the necessary tools to shape anything
      thicker than sheet metal for the connectors. The price for a
      bender/brake/shear is about $30-$60.

      -Price spent on fabric; $15
      -Price spent on wood; $20
      -Price spent on metal/wire; $25
      -Price spent on Dremel/accessories; $165

      -Knowing you'll be prepared for Archistructerior Project; PRICELESS!
    • Chris_Dye
      Pete, Great idea on the c-beam braces. Tiny screws (machine, with nuts) can be found at Central Computer or Optometry shops, and Guitar repair shops or a train
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 4, 2008
        Pete,

        Great idea on the c-beam braces.

        Tiny screws (machine, with nuts) can be found at Central Computer or
        Optometry shops, and Guitar repair shops or a train / RC dedicated
        store (Trains, Dollhouses and More in Novato has a huge selection)
        will have tiny wood screws. Not sure how small the screws get at Home
        Depot, but what I did find there are some cool little gizmos called
        "tension clips". They are a small metal tube that is slit down one
        side, so that a narrower shaft of metal can be slipped in from either
        end and be held securely. I used them to fashion hoops out of wire,
        and they get pretty small (the smallest I found are probably 2mm dia.
        Also, the Ace hardware on Market between Church and 14th st
        (underground) in addition to having a fairly large selection, is
        family owned, and the owner will order parts for you if he doesn't
        have them.

        Maybe also Jeweler's supply store, but I don't know of one off hand.

        Too bad we're not an industrial city any more...

        -=c
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