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Re: Shane Battier - a great player?

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  • Dean Oliver
    Even worse, I ve seen me make 8 in a row. A hand in the face matters. How you do it matters. When you do it matters. Defense is what I did... because I
    Message 1 of 22 , Jan 30, 2005
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      Even worse, I've seen me make 8 in a row.

      A hand in the face matters. How you do it matters. When you do it
      matters. Defense is what I did... because I certainly couldn't make 8
      in a row in a game.

      DeanO

      Dean Oliver
      Consultant to the Seattle Supersonics
      Author, Basketball on Paper
      http://www.basketballonpaper.com
      "Oliver's book provides an insightful framework for basketball. His
      approach highlights and simplifies the basic goals of team offenses
      and defenses, with an interesting description of how teamwork among
      players with different roles can be evaluated. This book is a unique
      and surprisingly practical addition to a coach's library." Dean
      Smith, Hall of Fame Basketball Coach, University of North Carolina


      --- In APBR_analysis@yahoogroups.com, Coach McCormick
      <highfivehoopschool@y...> wrote:
      > I've seen Peja Stojakovic make about 25-30 threes in a row in
      practice. Heck, I saw Mateen Cleaves make 10 in a row...
      >
      > Philip Maymin <pmaymin@g...> wrote:I tracked practice shots for a
      variety of players in shootaround
      > before the media access times (the "real" shootaround as opposed to
      > the one for the fans) and though it seemed a little higher, especially
      > when someone initially unexpected like Richard Jefferson started
      > nailing consecutive very long threes halfway to halfcourt, when I
      > compared the percentages they weren't all that different from his game
      > performances. There's a confirmatory bias at work if you just watch
      > someone shoot: you dismiss a couple clanks as "near hits", a bunch of
      > clanks as "warming up," and when they hit a couple in a row you think
      > they are 100%. Turns out your experience is about right in that the
      > defender tends not to matter too much, though I don't have an
      > extremely large sample size. Certainly free throw shooting didn't seem
      > to be any different in practice than in games.
      >
      >
      > On Sat, 29 Jan 2005 02:03:21 -0500, Stephen Greenwell
      > <sgre6768@p...> wrote:
      > > If Allen Iverson goes for a steal and misses, which happens about
      five
      > > times a game, and as a result his man gets a wide-open shot, that
      > > isn't recorded either.
      > > Out of curiosity, has anyone ever looked at what NBA players shoot
      when
      > > they're WIDE OPEN? I'm talking about practice, game time, etc. From
      > > anecdotal experience, I generally shoot about the same (or at
      least I think
      > > I do!) assuming I have a clean look and don't have to alter a shot
      - The
      > > distance of the guy/girl from me doesn't matter.
      > >
      > > Even if there *is* a difference, does the increase in shooting
      percentage
      > > negate the value of an occasional block or steal? For example, does
      > > Iverson's man improve from a 40 to 75 percent shooter if he's left
      > > unguarded? Can anyone shoot a jumper for this high of a
      percentage even if
      > > they're left wide open? Watching players in practice, I've seen
      some people
      > > go on streaks of 3 to 10 threes in a row, but I've also seen this
      in a game
      > > where the shot sample size is much smaller. At what point does
      improved
      > > shooting percentage from an out-of-position defender make up for
      steals and
      > > blocks generated?
      > >
      > > I doubt there are answers to all (or any) of my questions, but I'm
      > > interested to know if anyone has any thoughts.
      > >
      > > Stephen Greenwell
      > > ________________________________
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