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Re: Differences between young Americans and young foreign players

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  • doc319
    Just to clarify, I agree that the adapting to rules scenario works both ways. My point was that I think that it was actually an impressive achievement for this
    Message 1 of 31 , Sep 1, 2004
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      Just to clarify, I agree that the adapting to rules scenario works
      both ways. My point was that I think that it was actually an
      impressive achievement for this thrown together NBA team to win a
      bronze medal under FIBA rules because I doubt that any of the
      foreign teams could do the equivalent in the NBA on such short
      notice. Certainly, many foreign players can adapt to the NBA given
      time, just as the NBA team showed improvement over the course of the
      Olympics, beating both teams that were 5-0 in pool play.



      >
      > One thing I'd like to point out with all this consideration of
      > adapting to rules is that it works both ways. If we reason that it
      > would take a little while for Americans to get used to
      International
      > Rules, then we should consider that some of these Europeans who
      > supposedly "haven't worked out" in the NBA just weren't given
      enough
      > time. Looking at some of the foreign players, many of them did
      take a
      > couple years to get as good as they have become.


      Other than the shaky officiating--and getting past the frustration
      of seeing the U.S. team struggle at times--FIBA ball is entertaining
      to watch.


      >
      > Frankly, international rules seem fine to me. Exciting
      basketball. A
      > bit more offense. Definitely a lot of good interior passing. Not
      > sure why interior passing is so rare in the US. The trapezoidal
      lane
      > doesn't explain it unless you stretch your arguments a long ways.
      >
      > DeanO
      >
    • doc319
      Just to clarify, I agree that the adapting to rules scenario works both ways. My point was that I think that it was actually an impressive achievement for this
      Message 31 of 31 , Sep 1, 2004
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        Just to clarify, I agree that the adapting to rules scenario works
        both ways. My point was that I think that it was actually an
        impressive achievement for this thrown together NBA team to win a
        bronze medal under FIBA rules because I doubt that any of the
        foreign teams could do the equivalent in the NBA on such short
        notice. Certainly, many foreign players can adapt to the NBA given
        time, just as the NBA team showed improvement over the course of the
        Olympics, beating both teams that were 5-0 in pool play.



        >
        > One thing I'd like to point out with all this consideration of
        > adapting to rules is that it works both ways. If we reason that it
        > would take a little while for Americans to get used to
        International
        > Rules, then we should consider that some of these Europeans who
        > supposedly "haven't worked out" in the NBA just weren't given
        enough
        > time. Looking at some of the foreign players, many of them did
        take a
        > couple years to get as good as they have become.


        Other than the shaky officiating--and getting past the frustration
        of seeing the U.S. team struggle at times--FIBA ball is entertaining
        to watch.


        >
        > Frankly, international rules seem fine to me. Exciting
        basketball. A
        > bit more offense. Definitely a lot of good interior passing. Not
        > sure why interior passing is so rare in the US. The trapezoidal
        lane
        > doesn't explain it unless you stretch your arguments a long ways.
        >
        > DeanO
        >
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