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Re: List of unmeasured stuff to track

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  • Dean Oliver
    ... good-decision-making ability there). ... I measure efficiency in terms of how many points a player produces per 100 possessions. A player produces points
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 29, 2004
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      --- In APBR_analysis@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Tamada" <tamada@o...>
      wrote:
      > >Stockton, etc. Darryl Dawkins - your example - was not nearly as
      > >efficient except in a couple years (his ratings were much noisier and
      > >probably a function of how he got used).
      > >
      > >Are there good decision-makers whose stats don't reflect that?
      >
      > How are you measuring efficiency? (I was thinking in terms of effective
      > FG% or even better PTS/(2*FGA+FTA) with a coefficient in front of FTA
      > if desired). Take 1981 e.g., when Chocolate Thunder was around his
      > most thunderous; using PTS/(2FGA+FTA), Dawkins' scoring efficiency was
      > 63% while Bird's was 52%. Bird was only in his second year, but already
      > recognized as one of the great shooters, decision-makers, and all-around
      > players in the league whereas Dawkins was recognized as a guy who knew
      > how to dunk (and to his credit, not to try to shoot too often in
      > other situations, so we must admit there was some
      good-decision-making ability there).
      >

      I measure efficiency in terms of how many points a player produces per
      100 possessions. A player produces points through made shots,
      assists, offensive rebounds. Their total possessions come from those
      plus turnovers and missed shots. So if they aren't making good
      decisions with the ball and it shows up as more turnovers or teammates
      who don't make as many shots, I'm capturing that to some degree.

      In 1981, Darryl Dawkins produced about 106 pts per 100 possessions.
      Larry Bird was at 107, the lowest of his career and still higher than
      Chocolate Thunder. Normally, Bird was up around 115, peaking at
      around 120. Almost all the truly good offensive players of the '80's
      were in the 115 range. Dawkins hit that range in 1986 with NJ when
      his shooting went up to 64%, he was getting to the line more, and he
      wasn't committing as many turnovers.

      DeanO

      Dean Oliver
      Author, Basketball on Paper
      http://www.basketballonpaper.com
      "Oliver's book provides an insightful framework for basketball. His
      approach highlights and simplifies the basic goals of team offenses
      and defenses, with an interesting description of how teamwork among
      players with different roles can be evaluated. This book is a unique
      and surprisingly practical addition to a coach's library." Dean
      Smith, Hall of Fame Basketball Coach, University of North Carolina
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