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clutch performance

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  • bchaikin@aol.com
    using the stats database at the APBR website, you can open up at the same time both the players regular season stats database and the players playoff stats
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 1, 2001
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      using the stats database at the APBR website, you can open up at the same time both the players regular season stats database and the players playoff stats database. then click on "window" from the top menu and then click on "tile" so that each takes up half the screen. you can then select the same player in each database to compare a player's regular season career stats to his playoff career stats...

      i also don't know exactly what most people mean by "clutch", but i've found better overall playoff performance versus regular season performance a good criteria. a player can always "...take a night off..." during the regular season, but in the playoffs that can mean suicide. thus if a player's overall per minute numbers are better in the playoffs, plus their shooting percentages, to me that means he's a clutch player...

      bob chaikin
      bchaikin@...
    • Mike Goodman
      Taking my list of the 515 most productive players of all time, I find the following breakdown for career Playoff/Regular Season production rate: PO/RS # %
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 3, 2001
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        Taking my list of the 515 'most productive' players of all time, I
        find the following breakdown for career Playoff/Regular Season
        production rate:

        PO/RS # % of T
        1.10+ 17 .034
        1.05+ 51 .100
        1.00+ 134 .264
        .95+ 263 .518

        So, only 26.4% of all players actually improve their production in
        the playoffs, and only 10% improve by as much as 5%.

        The median ratio is .947.

        The breakdown continues as such:
        PO/RS # % of T
        .95- 244 .482
        .90- 131 .258
        .85- 57 .112
        .80- 35 .069
        .75- 17 .034

        So a player who picks up his game by as much as 10% is as rare as a
        player who's game diminishes by 25%.

        ( 8 of the 515 have no playoff appearances)

        It seems that we could compare playoff production against the median
        of .947 production, to get an idea of playoff over/under-
        achievement. Actually, I think I did that once, and for player
        careers, you still get some irregularities, such as Bill Cartwright,
        who played most of his playoff minutes well past his prime, etc. So,
        a season-by-season analysis might be in order.

        --- In APBR_analysis@y..., bchaikin@a... wrote:
        >
        > i also don't know exactly what most people mean by "clutch", but
        i've found
        > better overall playoff performance versus regular season
        performance a good
        > criteria. a player can always "...take a night off..." during the
        regular
        > season, but in the playoffs that can mean suicide. thus if a
        player's overall
        > per minute numbers are better in the playoffs, plus their shooting
        > percentages, to me that means he's a clutch player...
        >
        > bob chaikin
        > bchaikin@b...
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