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progression or regression

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  • schtevie2003
    Perhaps one game against top international competition is a little to early to take stock of the implications, but, hey, it s a slow summer news day. So, here
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 27, 2003
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      Perhaps one game against top international competition is a
      little to early to take stock of the implications, but, hey, it's a slow
      summer news day.

      So, here is my impression of the Olympic qualifying (based only
      on second hand reports in the newspaper and no box scores).
      The U.S. sends its newly and highly motivated A-team to the
      tournament. In its first few games in the decidedly weaker of the
      two divisions, the reported play was offensively sloppy but
      selfless and defensively strong, resulting in blowout scores,
      though opposing teams had their moments and quarters. Then
      in the first game against the Argentines, against whom the
      motivation was presumably the highest, the offensive play was
      strong (the defensive effort presumably consistent) the game
      was very close.

      Let's assume one game is a trend, what does this mean? Well,
      to my mind it should offer strong comment on the "standing on
      the shoulders of giants / things are going to hell in a
      handbasket" school of thought, as regards the NBA. How so?
      Taking the world against the best the USA has to offer as a
      metric, things are rather apparently getting better - much better -
      talentwise. Thus, unless one is inclined to think that Tim
      Duncan and Tracy McGrady are poster-children of all that
      plagues the NBA, the infusion of foreigners into the NBA should
      be viewed as a net improvement in the average talent of the
      league, not a mere substitution on the scrub margin.

      And this in turn has implications on interpreting NBA trends.
      Low offensive productivity, bad offense or good defense? The
      former interpretation is increasingly difficult to support.

      Thoughts?
    • harlanzo
      ... the infusion of foreigners into the NBA should ... I would think the addition of euros is a net improvement but two other factors to consider: 1) have we
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 27, 2003
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        --- In APBR_analysis@yahoogroups.com, "schtevie2003" <schtevie@h...>
        wrote:
        >
        >
        the infusion of foreigners into the NBA should
        > be viewed as a net improvement in the average talent of the
        > league, not a mere substitution on the scrub margin.
        >
        > And this in turn has implications on interpreting NBA trends.
        > Low offensive productivity, bad offense or good defense? The
        > former interpretation is increasingly difficult to support.
        >
        > Thoughts?

        I would think the addition of euros is a net improvement but two
        other factors to consider:

        1) have we maxed out the number of useful euros in the nba or are
        there a bunch of decent euros who could come him here and play near
        average thus raising the talent pool?

        2) does international competition overstate how good some of these
        guys are? the 3 point line is much closer than the nba, the lane
        shorter, the game shorter, its possible that a lot of guys who have
        looked good in these games are barely adequate if not worse in the
        nba (for recent examples see ruben wolkwyski, shane heal, Mirsad
        Truckan, Carlos Arroyo)

        I tend to think more euros could come over here in do well if the
        teams were willing to invest the time. The interesting question is
        if/when the nba goes into europe, how much expansion could there be
        without diluting the talent pool?
      • John Hollinger
        Dead on with point No. 2, except for Arroyo, who I think will surprise a lot of people with Utah this year. On point No. 1, there are also a few Europeans who
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 3, 2003
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          Dead on with point No. 2, except for Arroyo, who I think will
          surprise a lot of people with Utah this year.

          On point No. 1, there are also a few Europeans who NBA teams have
          desperately been trying to get to play in the league but have been
          more than happy to stay in Europe. Most prominent among them is Dejan
          Bodiroga, who the Kings took the same year they picked Stojakovic and
          is a superstar in Spain but has no intention of ever leaving. Milos
          Vujanic, Andres Noccioni, Nikola Vujcic and a few others could also
          pretty clearly play in the NBA if they felt like it.



          --- In APBR_analysis@yahoogroups.com, "harlanzo" <harlanzo@y...>
          wrote:
          > --- In APBR_analysis@yahoogroups.com, "schtevie2003"
          <schtevie@h...>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > the infusion of foreigners into the NBA should
          > > be viewed as a net improvement in the average talent of the
          > > league, not a mere substitution on the scrub margin.
          > >
          > > And this in turn has implications on interpreting NBA trends.
          > > Low offensive productivity, bad offense or good defense? The
          > > former interpretation is increasingly difficult to support.
          > >
          > > Thoughts?
          >
          > I would think the addition of euros is a net improvement but two
          > other factors to consider:
          >
          > 1) have we maxed out the number of useful euros in the nba or are
          > there a bunch of decent euros who could come him here and play near
          > average thus raising the talent pool?
          >
          > 2) does international competition overstate how good some of these
          > guys are? the 3 point line is much closer than the nba, the lane
          > shorter, the game shorter, its possible that a lot of guys who have
          > looked good in these games are barely adequate if not worse in the
          > nba (for recent examples see ruben wolkwyski, shane heal, Mirsad
          > Truckan, Carlos Arroyo)
          >
          > I tend to think more euros could come over here in do well if the
          > teams were willing to invest the time. The interesting question is
          > if/when the nba goes into europe, how much expansion could there be
          > without diluting the talent pool?
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