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Re: SABR/Sports Econ update

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  • John Hollinger
    At this point, I have to point out that the Lakers haven t drafted a good player since Kupchak took over. Too often we use role player for somebody on a good
    Message 1 of 52 , Aug 1, 2003
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      At this point, I have to point out that the Lakers haven't drafted a
      good player since Kupchak took over. Too often we use "role player"
      for somebody on a good team when we would say "worthless pile of
      crap" if he played for the Nuggets. Mark Madsen and Kareem Rush
      certainly fall into this category.

      >
      > I would agree with you that Phil has done a wonderful job of
      fitting
      > role players in. But I would also say that this speaks to his
      > generally sticking to veterans. Veterans with abilities that fit
      > within his system, or preferred style of play. But if you look at
      the
      > draft the Lakers went with more "seasoned" picks as well. Cook
      looks
      > to have a game quite similar to Horry's although I'll wager their
      > college stats are not that similar(don't have them in front of me
      at
      > the moment). And Walton's game also bears a superficial resemblance
      > to Fox's; cerebral passing small forward, capable of spot-shooting
      > and rebounding duties. Not incredibly athletic, but steady. I'll
      come
      > back to this.
      >
    • igor eduardo küpfer
      ... From: Gary Collard To: APBR_analysis@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, August 07, 2003 12:13 PM Subject: Re: [APBR_analysis] SABR/Sports Econ update ... That
      Message 52 of 52 , Aug 8, 2003
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        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Thursday, August 07, 2003 12:13 PM
        Subject: Re: [APBR_analysis] SABR/Sports Econ update

        Jim Armstrong wrote:
        >
        > On Mon, Aug 04, 2003 at 04:00:38PM -0500, Gary Collard wrote:
        > > I'm not sure why that was so controversial.  The concept of market size in
        > > the NFL is pretty much meaningless, since most league revenue is shared
        > > equally.  The reason that a Yankees in baseball have such an advantage is
        > > that they have local TV revenues that are an order of magnitude or more
        > > greater than most (all?) of the other teams and is significant compared to
        > > national revenue, thus they can afford to have a payroll that is 60%
        > > greater than any other team even before they pay the luxury tax as they do
        > > in 2003.  In the NFL, there is no local TV at all, and (over a period of
        > > years, letting spikes in bonus payments wash out) little payroll deviation,
        >
        > Actually, if you look at the distribution of team player payrolls, the NFL
        > and the NBA are quite comparable (see standard deviation in data below).

        That is why I specifically said "over a period of years, letting spikes in
        bonus payments wash out" in the case of the NFL.  The one year payroll
        numbers you listed are meaningless to my point, do you have the data to run
        them for the last 5 years or more?  That will tell you who has the "harder"
        cap.

        --
        Gary Collard
        Maybe the coefficient of variation (SD / Mean * 100) is a more apt measure for comparing the variation of payrolls for different sports across seasons.
         
        Year     NHL     NFL     NBA     MLB
        1994    28.3     8.7    15.2    26.6
        1995    26.6    12.7    24.1    27.7
        1996    43.3    11.9    21.9    31.4
        1997    #N/A    15.3    28.9    33.0
        1998    #N/A    12.1    27.0    37.4
        1999    33.4    12.0    23.0    43.1
        2000    37.4    13.8    23.6    38.3
        2001    31.1    13.5    24.6    38.3
        2002    33.0    18.1    20.6    36.6
        2003    35.9    #N/A    24.0    38.9
         
        On this measure, NBA teams show less variation in payroll than baseball and hockey teams, but the NFL teams are more level than any of them.

        Data from Rodney Fort's excellent resource: http://users.pullman.com/rodfort/SportsBusiness/BizFrame.htm
         
        ed
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