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Re: underclassmen and the draft

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  • Mike Goodman
    ... best ... simple age) ... What about championship minutes? What of that frozen moment when the shot has been released, the shot that will either secure
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 24, 2001
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      --- In APBR_analysis@y..., "Michael K. Tamada" <tamada@o...> wrote:
      >
      >
      ....people here have come up with several hypotheses for player
      > development:
      >
      > 1. simple age (a 24 year old will play better than an 18 year old)
      > 2. receiving training (including practice time, perhaps this is
      best
      > measured by practice minutes, or number of practices, or months of
      > practice -- though that'll be practically identical with using
      simple age)
      > 3. minutes (or games, or seasons) of actual playing time
      > 4. minutes (or games, or seasons) of non-garbage playing time
      >
      What about championship minutes? What of that frozen moment when
      the shot has been released, the shot that will either secure one's
      legacy as an amateur player, or tarnish it?
      Michael Jordan hit a championship shot in college. Did this whet
      his appetite for more, and sustain him thru the lean years in Chicago?
      Hakeem never won a college title. Did coming-so-close allow him
      to focus on doing even more to ensure that future opportunities would
      not slip away?
      A very-good college-age player, it seems, faces the choice of
      vying for a national collegiate championship, or putting in time on
      an NBA bench (or on the floor for a bad team).
      If money is everything, and sooner is better, then you don't like
      the possibility of an injury in college, carving out of your earning
      and achievment potential. If there is anything to the notion that
      certain vital personality traits are learned at certain ages, then
      you have an argument: that anyone who likes the idea of college
      competition may well do better by going to school, having that
      youthful experience, and letting the pro career happen later.
      How many NBA players have expressed regret at staying in school
      longer than was economically expedient? Has Jordan publicly lamented
      his time "wasted"? Has anyone?
      I like Kevin Garnett, even his expletives. Presumably, a college
      career would have purged him of his habit. But for every KG, there
      are probably a dozen or more guys who could develop, as people, more
      beneficially, by an amateur career, walking through the seasons, from
      dorm to class to gym, learning some life; and then going pro.
      Just my opinion.
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