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Re: Dilution, balance, and Bob-bashing

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  • Dean Oliver <deano@rawbw.com>
    ... away ... is ... I guess no one has shown that the racial majority has walked away from the game. They play more often now than ever before (as the NCAA
    Message 1 of 35 , Jan 3, 2003
      --- In APBR_analysis@yahoogroups.com, "Mike G <msg_53@h...>"
      <msg_53@h...> wrote:
      > The fact is, there are players from all over the country and from
      > different social backgrounds, but the racial majority has walked
      away
      > from the game. This cannot possibly be a good thing, or one that
      is
      > best served by saying 'It's not a problem'.
      >

      I guess no one has shown that the racial majority has walked away
      from the game. They play more often now than ever before (as the
      NCAA cites in their annual stats). They don't make it to the NBA as
      much. If they play more than ever, but don't make it to the top
      level as much, how is that a problem?

      > I think of the midwestern kid with the hoop nailed to the side of
      the
      > barn; later he plays organized ball. He is almost extinct.
      >

      That player is absolutely not extinct. What is going extinct,
      according to the press (which may not necessarily be right), are kids
      just playing on the playground (you said this yourself about your
      hometown). Too many kids are going to too many camps during the
      offseason where they play too many games with too little practice
      under frazzled coaches who let them do Sportscenter moves. Look at
      the basketball coaching Yahoo group and they talk about this
      frequently. Their discussions are about white kids, black kids,
      asian kids, hispanic kids and even girls to a lesser degree.

      So the "deafening silence" you mention every time you bring up the
      fact that there are fewer white players in the NBA than ever
      (implying that it is true throughout all levels of basketball) is
      because, well, I at least am uncertain what the problem is. I see
      other problems.

      (You'd be better off saying that top level scouting is biased against
      white players, allowing skilled white players to fall through the
      cracks, just as it happened for black players for a long time. That,
      of course, is unsubstantiated but the speculation has been around and
      you could probably dig up some real justification.)

      DeanO
    • John Hollinger <alleyoop2@yahoo.com>
      ... watched ... Put me firmly in the pompous windbag camp. The best thing about the Mason comment, for instance, was that Rosen said the reason Mason can t
      Message 35 of 35 , Jan 11, 2003
        > I particularly enjoyed Rosen's article on the Sonics where he
        watched
        > one game (one of the worst of the year, for what it's worth) and
        > acted like he knew something about the team. Apparently, Desmond
        > Mason can't make a jumper because he had one bad night.

        Put me firmly in the "pompous windbag" camp. The best thing about the
        Mason comment, for instance, was that Rosen said the reason Mason
        can't make a jumper was his "low release point", which was hilarious
        on several levels:

        1) Apparently he's never watched Steve Kerr. Or Andrew Toney. Or
        Bryce Drew. Or about a hundred other guys who shoot from under their
        chin but make everything.

        2) Mason's release point isn't low, especially given that he's about
        20 feet off the ground when he shoots it.

        3) Mason's problem isn't the release point, it's the lack of arc on
        his shot.
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