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demographics

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  • mikel_ind
    Here s a study of how each state has contributed NBA players, by decade. Rather than list numbers of players, I have listed total minutes played, by state of
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 3, 2002
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      Here's a study of how each state has contributed NBA players, by
      decade. Rather than list numbers of players, I have listed total
      minutes played, by state of origin, per decade.

      To chart trends, I have listed state totals, plus black and white
      totals. This is to get an idea of regional participation in
      basketball, and in most cases, the race difference is a big one.

      An APBR member provided me with the race designations, and I have not
      questioned them. It appears that mixed-race players are
      considered 'black'; and a check of the U.S. census indicates less
      than 5% 'mixed-race' in most states.

      For state of origin, if a player was born in State A, and went to
      high school in State B, then his NBA minutes are assigned half to A
      and half to B.

      Regions are Northeast, Upper Midwest, Mason-Dixon, Deep South, West
      Coast, and Mountains/Plains. There isn't a clear reason for these
      groupings, but it does help looking at the big picture.

      Numbers are per-year average minutes for the decade, for players from
      the state.

      Northeast

      Connecticut
      dec 50's 60's 70's 80's 90's 00's
      all ---- 1235 4678 9184 8912 4571
      wht ---- 1235 `485 2168 2193 `620
      blk ---- ---- 4193 7017 6719 3951

      Massachusetts
      dec 50's 60's 70's 80's 90's 00's
      all `402 `649 2421 2596 5006 5204
      wht `402 `462 `983 1412 2027 1246
      blk ---- `187 1438 1184 2979 3958

      New Jersey
      dec 50's 60's `70's `80's `90's `00's
      all 4817 7023 18676 11163 14068 14207
      wht 4817 3866 11755 `4959 `1605 `1121
      blk ---- 3156 `6921 `6204 12463 13086

      New York
      dec `50's `60's `70's `80's `90's `00's
      all 27082 31962 60665 50164 42326 40396
      wht 23871 19721 15692 10104 `9419 `7758
      blk `3211 12241 44973 40060 32906 32637

      Pennsylvania
      dec `50's `60's `70's `80's `90's `00's
      all 15841 25968 43379 17178 16779 25650
      wht 12030 `9645 15422 `5878 `1242 `1923
      blk `3811 16323 27958 11300 15537 23726


      Here they are as a percent of the total NBA minutes played.

      Connecticut
      dec 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 00s
      wht --- 0.5 0.1 0.4 0.4 0.1
      blk --- --- 0.8 1.4 1.2 0.7
      %W --- 100 10% 24% 25% 14%

      Massachusetts
      dec 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 00s
      wht 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.2
      blk --- 0.1 0.3 0.2 0.5 0.7
      `%W 100 71% 41% 54% 40% 24%

      New Jersey
      dec 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 00s
      wht 3.0 1.6 2.2 1.0 0.3 0.2
      blk --- 1.3 1.3 1.3 2.2 2.3
      %W 100 55% 63% 44% 11% `8%

      New York
      dec 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 00s
      wht 15. 8.0 2.9 2.1 1.7 1.4
      blk 2.0 5.0 8.3 8.2 5.9 5.7
      % W 88% 62% 26% 20% 22% 19%

      Pennsylvania
      dec 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 00s
      wht 7.6 3.9 2.9 1.2 0.2 0.3
      blk 2.4 6.6 5.2 2.3 2.8 4.2
      %Wh 76% 37% 36% 34% `7% `7%

      Pennsylvania resembles some of the Mason-Dixon states (KY, TN), in
      the virtual disappearance of white players since the '80s.

      I'm not listing states which have never produced 1% of the NBA player-
      minutes for a decade.

      See how this flies, and I will return with more Regions.
    • doc319
      In some earlier posts I questioned both the relevance of determining the racial demographics of the NBA and the methodology for doing so. I will not rehash
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 4, 2002
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        In some earlier posts I questioned both the relevance of determining
        the racial demographics of the NBA and the methodology for doing so.
        I will not rehash everything that I said before, but focus my
        comments on several posts that purport to describe the racial
        backgrounds of NBA players hailing from various states. First, what
        does it mean that an APBR member "provided" the racial designations--
        is this person a trained ethnographer who is familiar with the family
        backgrounds of everyone who has played enough minutes in the NBA to
        qualify for your study's parameters? Otherwise, the racial
        designations are meaningless and there is no way to determine
        anything from these charts (I'm not quite sure what you are trying to
        determine anyway...).

        Later you state that if a player is born in one state and plays high
        school ball in another state then his NBA minutes are split evenly
        between the two states. In another post you state that Alaska has not
        produced a black player in ten years. Trajan Langdon was born in
        California but played high school ball in Alaska. I don't know how
        your source classified him--most people probably think of him as
        black, although he actually has one white parent and one black
        parent. By your standards shouldn't he be counted as "half" a black
        player produced by Alaska, since he played his high school ball there
        and "mixed" players are counted as black by your source?


        --- In APBR_analysis@y..., "mikel_ind" <msg_53@h...> wrote:
        > Here's a study of how each state has contributed NBA players, by
        > decade. Rather than list numbers of players, I have listed total
        > minutes played, by state of origin, per decade.
        >
        > To chart trends, I have listed state totals, plus black and white
        > totals. This is to get an idea of regional participation in
        > basketball, and in most cases, the race difference is a big one.
        >
        > An APBR member provided me with the race designations, and I have
        not
        > questioned them. It appears that mixed-race players are
        > considered 'black'; and a check of the U.S. census indicates less
        > than 5% 'mixed-race' in most states.
        >
        > For state of origin, if a player was born in State A, and went to
        > high school in State B, then his NBA minutes are assigned half to A
        > and half to B.
        >
        > Regions are Northeast, Upper Midwest, Mason-Dixon, Deep South, West
        > Coast, and Mountains/Plains. There isn't a clear reason for these
        > groupings, but it does help looking at the big picture.
        >
        > Numbers are per-year average minutes for the decade, for players
        from
        > the state.
        >
        > Northeast
        >
        > Connecticut
        > dec 50's 60's 70's 80's 90's 00's
        > all ---- 1235 4678 9184 8912 4571
        > wht ---- 1235 `485 2168 2193 `620
        > blk ---- ---- 4193 7017 6719 3951
        >
        > Massachusetts
        > dec 50's 60's 70's 80's 90's 00's
        > all `402 `649 2421 2596 5006 5204
        > wht `402 `462 `983 1412 2027 1246
        > blk ---- `187 1438 1184 2979 3958
        >
        > New Jersey
        > dec 50's 60's `70's `80's `90's `00's
        > all 4817 7023 18676 11163 14068 14207
        > wht 4817 3866 11755 `4959 `1605 `1121
        > blk ---- 3156 `6921 `6204 12463 13086
        >
        > New York
        > dec `50's `60's `70's `80's `90's `00's
        > all 27082 31962 60665 50164 42326 40396
        > wht 23871 19721 15692 10104 `9419 `7758
        > blk `3211 12241 44973 40060 32906 32637
        >
        > Pennsylvania
        > dec `50's `60's `70's `80's `90's `00's
        > all 15841 25968 43379 17178 16779 25650
        > wht 12030 `9645 15422 `5878 `1242 `1923
        > blk `3811 16323 27958 11300 15537 23726
        >
        >
        > Here they are as a percent of the total NBA minutes played.
        >
        > Connecticut
        > dec 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 00s
        > wht --- 0.5 0.1 0.4 0.4 0.1
        > blk --- --- 0.8 1.4 1.2 0.7
        > %W --- 100 10% 24% 25% 14%
        >
        > Massachusetts
        > dec 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 00s
        > wht 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.2
        > blk --- 0.1 0.3 0.2 0.5 0.7
        > `%W 100 71% 41% 54% 40% 24%
        >
        > New Jersey
        > dec 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 00s
        > wht 3.0 1.6 2.2 1.0 0.3 0.2
        > blk --- 1.3 1.3 1.3 2.2 2.3
        > %W 100 55% 63% 44% 11% `8%
        >
        > New York
        > dec 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 00s
        > wht 15. 8.0 2.9 2.1 1.7 1.4
        > blk 2.0 5.0 8.3 8.2 5.9 5.7
        > % W 88% 62% 26% 20% 22% 19%
        >
        > Pennsylvania
        > dec 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 00s
        > wht 7.6 3.9 2.9 1.2 0.2 0.3
        > blk 2.4 6.6 5.2 2.3 2.8 4.2
        > %Wh 76% 37% 36% 34% `7% `7%
        >
        > Pennsylvania resembles some of the Mason-Dixon states (KY, TN), in
        > the virtual disappearance of white players since the '80s.
        >
        > I'm not listing states which have never produced 1% of the NBA
        player-
        > minutes for a decade.
        >
        > See how this flies, and I will return with more Regions.
      • mikel_ind
        ... - ... family ... I trimmed the list down to guys who have logged 100 NBA minutes or 200 ABA minutes, since 1952. The list had many more players than this.
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 5, 2002
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          --- In APBR_analysis@y..., "doc319" <doc319@y...> wrote:
          >
          > ... what
          > does it mean that an APBR member "provided" the racial designations-
          -
          > is this person a trained ethnographer who is familiar with the
          family
          > backgrounds of everyone who has played enough minutes in the NBA to
          > qualify for your study's parameters?

          I trimmed the list down to guys who have logged 100 NBA minutes or
          200 ABA minutes, since 1952. The list had many more players than
          this. Information was spotty in the old days (pre-1950), and in the
          early days of the ABA. For lots of the bit players, neither state of
          birth nor high school was listed.

          Interestingly, however, people's race was remembered, and 100% of the
          players I used were designated W or B. I don't know who did the
          designating, and I didn't find any errors. I realize mixed-race
          players are listed as black.

          > Otherwise, the racial
          > designations are meaningless and there is no way to determine
          > anything from these charts (I'm not quite sure what you are trying
          to
          > determine anyway...).

          To me, the NBA is a spectator sport, and I like a good product.

          I read food labels. I want to know what I am eating. My mom doesn't
          want to know what she is eating. It doesn't mean anything to her, to
          read the fat content or the sugar content.

          To another person, the fat content is meaningless, except as a
          percentage of the calories; I forget why. Yet to me, the fat content
          is still meaningful.

          We all have our comfort level with information. I like to think all
          information is useful. You may make of it what you like, and add to
          it at your discretion.

          So, after sitting on this pile of information, and organizing it
          several ways, I decided to share it, to see what everyone else thinks.


          > Later you state that if a player is born in one state and plays
          high
          > school ball in another state then his NBA minutes are split evenly
          > between the two states. In another post you state that Alaska has
          not
          > produced a black player in ten years. Trajan Langdon was born in
          > California but played high school ball in Alaska.

          That's a good spot, and I appreciate it!

          Alaska got bumped off the top of my screen, apparently, when I went
          to using census data to get per-capita. (To my dismay, state
          abbreviations alphabatize quite differently than do the whole names;
          thus AK moved ahead of AL, even though Alabama precedes Alaska.
          Shuffling the census data to line up with my lines, was vexing.)
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