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  • ...––––– On Jan 15, 2015, at 17:49, Beatrice Hopkinson beahopkinson@^$3 [ANE-2] < ANE-2@^$4 > wrote: Re Rashi's comment on Num.18 that "salt never becomes smelly"- this does not sound like a correct...
    Beatrice Hopkinson Jan 17
  • Re Rashi's comment on Num.18 that "salt never becomes smelly"- this does not sound like a correct translation. My thinking is that the meaning is more likely that salt prevents (food from becoming) putrid." or 'from becoming smelly". Bea Beatrice Hopkinson, Emeritus Secretary, Los Angeles Branch, Oxford University Society. On Sep 23, 2014, at 1:22 AM, Yigal Levin yigal.levin@^$1...
    Beatrice Hopkinson Jan 16
  • I have no idea on that one - in turns of salary the word salarium is usually used - but you could be right. Bea Beatrice Hopkinson, Hon. Secretary, Los Angeles Branch, Oxford University Society. On Nov 9, 2014, at 6:20 AM, 'Lisbeth Fried' lizfried@^$1 [ANE-2] < ANE-2@^$2 > wrote: I have assumed that the satrapal officials being “salted with the salt of the palace” (Ezra 4:14...
    Beatrice Hopkinson Nov 10, 2014
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  • Jim, 'A covenant with salt' is no curious little phrase. Salt entered into every phase of life in antiquity and particularly in biblical life, as it does today. There are 32 references to salt in the bible. If you broke bread and salt with anyone it sealed an agreement as stated in Lev.2:13. All offerings to the gods were salted. Makes sense when you have hundreds of people...
    Beatrice Hopkinson Nov 9, 2014
  • A covenant of salt as per the examples you give below was essentially a binding agreement between two 'people' - thus in the Bible you agreed to make offerings to the Lord, i.e. Priests, and in so doing these offerings were sealed by including salt. I am of the opinion that these rituals in antiquity had a practical purpose behind them, and that inclusion of salt was to preserve...
    Beatrice Hopkinson Sep 23, 2014
  • A covenant of salt in antiquity was to seal an agreement. Bea Hopkinson Beatrice Hopkinson, Hon. Secretary, Los Angeles Branch, Oxford University Society. On Sep 18, 2014, at 4:39 PM, Jim West jwest@^$1 [ANE-2] < ANE-2@^$2 > wrote: hello all. has anyone done any work on the curious little phrase 'covenant of salt' in 2 chronicles 13:5? thankya -- +++++++ Jim West, ThD
    Beatrice Hopkinson Sep 22, 2014
  • ...Archaeological Trust) Board AIA (Archaeological Institute of America), Affiliate, Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, UCLA 818 766 7780 < beahopkinson@^$1 ) On Sep 9, 2014, at 6:41 AM, whiting@^$2 [ANE-2] < ANE-2@^$3 > wrote: > (Turkish isn't an example because the language wasn...
    Beatrice Hopkinson Sep 10, 2014
  • I am interested in weights and measures in Mesopotamia and as your replies might be offline would you please be good enough to forward me the references. With thanks, Beatrice Hopkinson Hon. Secretary Oxford University Soc. LA Branch President, DBSAT (Droitwich Brine Springs and ArchaeologicalTrust) Board AIA (Archaeological Institute of America) Affiliate, Cotsen Institute of...
    Beatrice Hopkinson Jul 10, 2013
  • Larry, I don't know if this has ever been done - but it seems to me that if you were to fire the tablet in an electric kiln to harden the clay - you could then seep the tablet in water to dissolve the salts. But I wouldn't advise doing this unless someone has tried it on something that doesn't matter as much as your cuneiform tablet. I am presuming that your tablet has never been...
    Beatrice Hopkinson Jul 7, 2013
  • According to wikipedia it could be a little earlier: The oldest known occurrence of the name Mesopotamia comes from the Anabasis Alexandri, which was written in the late second century AD but specifically refers to sources from the time of Alexander the Great. In the Anabasis, Mesopotamia was used to designate the land east of the Euphrates in north Syria. The Aramaic term biritum...
    Beatrice Hopkinson Apr 3, 2013