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Wikipedia, the Boomerang, staff slings

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  • Clark Whelton
    ... Combining a staff with a sling (illustration at http://www.lloydianaspects.co.uk/weapons/staffsling.html) has the effect of lengthening the slinger s arm,
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 31, 2009
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      >On Sat, 31 Jan 2009, Nahed Johnspoon wrote:
      >
      >> On 1430 05 Safar 04, at 20:30 EST, Brian Colless wrote: "The trouble
      >> with Wiki is the interference from pedants and ignoramuses. That
      >> article has my table of the signs and their sound values (taken from
      >> ANE postings); I have just noticed that someone has altered my gaml
      >> "boomerang" to "sling staff", because boomerang is Australian; well,
      >> so am I, but I am also international, and boomerang is, too."
      >>
      >> The term I've found used outside of studies of Australia is actually
      >> "rabbit stick", which I'm rather fond of. But what on Earth is a
      >> "sling staff"? Never heard that one before.


      Bob Whiting wrote:


      >>>"Sling staff" sounds like a Babelfish translation of "throw stick".



      Combining a staff with a sling (illustration at http://www.lloydianaspects.co.uk/weapons/staffsling.html) has the effect of lengthening the slinger's arm, thereby adding to the speed and distance a sling missile can be thrown. An atlatl serves the same purpose for spear throwers.

      I'm not sure that throw sticks, such as boomerangs, were used as weapons or for hunting in the ANE.



      Clark Whelton
      New York
    • Andrés Piquer Otero
      ... Off the head, I recall O. Keel s The Iconography of the Ancient Near East including a number of ANE pictorial renderings with weapons that the author (or
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 31, 2009
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        Clark Whelton wrote:
        >
        >
        > I'm not sure that throw sticks, such as boomerangs, were used as
        > weapons or for hunting in the ANE.
        >
        > Clark Whelton
        > New York
        >
        >
        >






        Off the head, I recall O. Keel's "The Iconography of the Ancient Near
        East" including a number of ANE pictorial renderings with weapons that
        the author (or the academic sources he cites) interpret as "throwing
        sticks", whatever that instrument is.

        Andrés Piquer Otero
      • David Hall
        Throw sticks were used for hunting birds in ancient Egypt.  The hunter stood atop a papyrus skiff and tried to knock down a duck or goose:  
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 1, 2009
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          Throw sticks were used for hunting birds in ancient Egypt.  The hunter stood atop a papyrus skiff and tried to knock down a duck or goose:
           
          http://i-cias.com/egypt/photos/beni_hassan01.jpg

          A throw stick was found in King Tut's tomb:

          http://www.touregypt.net/museum/boomerangpage.htm
           
          David Q. Hall
          dqhall59@...

          --- On Sat, 1/31/09, Andrés Piquer Otero <erewan@...> wrote:

          From: Andrés Piquer Otero <erewan@...>
          Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Wikipedia, the Boomerang, staff slings
          To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Saturday, January 31, 2009, 1:25 PM






          Clark Whelton wrote:
          >
          >
          > I'm not sure that throw sticks, such as boomerangs, were used as
          > weapons or for hunting in the ANE.
          >
          > Clark Whelton
          > New York
          >
          >
          >

          Off the head, I recall O. Keel's "The Iconography of the Ancient Near
          East" including a number of ANE pictorial renderings with weapons that
          the author (or the academic sources he cites) interpret as "throwing
          sticks", whatever that instrument is.

          Andrés Piquer Otero
        • Brian Colless
          It is time I responded (favourably) to this. Whenever I encounter boomerang-deniers in connection with the origin of the letter G (gaml throwstick ; not
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 6, 2009
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            It is time I responded (favourably) to this.

            Whenever I encounter boomerang-deniers in connection with the origin
            of the letter G (gaml 'throwstick'; not camel, as taught in Hebew
            school!) my gentle retort is, as I said in my earlier trumpet vs bugle
            message (31 Jan 2009):

            "I remember seeing Tutankhamon's missiles on show in the Cairo Museum,
            with examples of Australian boomerangs for comparison; the difference
            was that his are made of ivory."

            I also have a big picture book of *Wonders of Tutankhamun* (Crown,
            1978). It turns out to be the same source that David has named:

            > A throw stick was found in King Tut's tomb:
            >
            > http://www.touregypt.net/museum/boomerangpage.htm
            >


            Actually, there was one ivory boomerang in his tomb, and some wooden
            ones.
            That source says that throw sticks and boomerangs were found in the
            Annex of the tomb.
            What is the difference?
            Not all Australian boomerangs are 'returning' missiles, though
            'boomerang' implies recoiling in English usage.

            When thinking about the gamlu (Krummholz, Bumerang, von Soden; bent
            stick, throwing-stick, Concise D) my mind plays with g-m-l as
            connoting completion and repayment, hence the returning aspect. Is
            this a silly idea that needs to be cleaned out of my head?

            Do the bentness and curving notions come from the boomerang and are
            then applied to the camel? And the sickle (maggalu)?

            I note that the throw-stick was used in all periods in ancient Egypt.
            And its hieroglyph ( T 14) is a determinative for 'throw-stick' from
            a root meaning 'throw') is also a club (Gardiner says) as det. of
            foreign peoples.

            What goes round comes round. Have you seen the French movie where a
            businessman is playing with his boomerangs en plein air? He launches
            one, then answers his phone, and .......

            Brian Colless
            Massey University, NZ

            On 2/02/2009, at 3:33 AM, David Hall wrote:

            > Throw sticks were used for hunting birds in ancient Egypt. The
            > hunter stood atop a papyrus skiff and tried to knock down a duck or
            > goose:
            >
            > http://i-cias.com/egypt/photos/beni_hassan01.jpg
            >
            > A throw stick was found in King Tut's tomb:
            >
            > http://www.touregypt.net/museum/boomerangpage.htm
            >
            > David Q. Hall
            > dqhall59@...
            >
            > --- On Sat, 1/31/09, Andrés Piquer Otero <erewan@...> wrote:
            >
            > From: Andrés Piquer Otero <erewan@...>
            > Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Wikipedia, the Boomerang, staff slings
            > To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Saturday, January 31, 2009, 1:25 PM
            >
            > Clark Whelton wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > > I'm not sure that throw sticks, such as boomerangs, were used as
            > > weapons or for hunting in the ANE.
            > >
            > > Clark Whelton
            > > New York
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            > Off the head, I recall O. Keel's "The Iconography of the Ancient Near
            > East" including a number of ANE pictorial renderings with weapons that
            > the author (or the academic sources he cites) interpret as "throwing
            > sticks", whatever that instrument is.
            >
            > Andrés Piquer Otero
            >
            >
            >
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • David Hall
            I recall a lecture given by a medical professor about Ancient Egyptian Medicine to a group of people interested in history.  He had a photo of a flat ivory
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 7, 2009
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              I recall a lecture given by a medical professor about Ancient Egyptian Medicine to a group of people interested in history.  He had a photo of a flat ivory object shaped like a boomerang that he had identified as a "birthing wand."  He also showed a three legged stool he indicated may have been used by midwives during childbirth.  I went to him after the lecture and told him I thought it was a throwstick.  I had spent some time memorizing some of the art at the Beni Hasan tombs in Middle Egypt from the early second millenium. 
               
              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Throw_stick_(hieroglyph) 
               
              The professor was able to show a slide of some petrie dish cultures on agar showing that myrhh was an antiobiotic and inhibited the growth of bacteria.  He indicated the Egyptians may have known about its anitbiotic properties and gave evidence for AE trade with Eastern Africa and India.  A check of articles about the use of myrhh as an antibiotic in ancient Egypt in google.com revealed more proponents of the theory myrhh was used as an antiobiotic and also to embalm mummies in ancient Egypt. 
               
              David Q. Hall
              dqhall59@...
               
               


              --- On Sat, 2/7/09, Brian Colless <briancolless@...> wrote:

              From: Brian Colless <briancolless@...>
              Subject: [ANE-2] Boomerangs in ANE
              To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Saturday, February 7, 2009, 12:42 AM






              It is time I responded (favourably) to this.

              Whenever I encounter boomerang-deniers in connection with the origin
              of the letter G (gaml 'throwstick' ; not camel, as taught in Hebew
              school!) my gentle retort is, as I said in my earlier trumpet vs bugle
              message (31 Jan 2009):

              "I remember seeing Tutankhamon' s missiles on show in the Cairo Museum,
              with examples of Australian boomerangs for comparison; the difference
              was that his are made of ivory."

              I also have a big picture book of *Wonders of Tutankhamun* (Crown,
              1978). It turns out to be the same source that David has named:

              > A throw stick was found in King Tut's tomb:
              >
              > http://www.touregyp t.net/museum/ boomerangpage. htm
              >

              Actually, there was one ivory boomerang in his tomb, and some wooden
              ones.
              That source says that throw sticks and boomerangs were found in the
              Annex of the tomb.
              What is the difference?
              Not all Australian boomerangs are 'returning' missiles, though
              'boomerang' implies recoiling in English usage.

              When thinking about the gamlu (Krummholz, Bumerang, von Soden; bent
              stick, throwing-stick, Concise D) my mind plays with g-m-l as
              connoting completion and repayment, hence the returning aspect. Is
              this a silly idea that needs to be cleaned out of my head?

              Do the bentness and curving notions come from the boomerang and are
              then applied to the camel? And the sickle (maggalu)?

              I note that the throw-stick was used in all periods in ancient Egypt.
              And its hieroglyph ( T 14) is a determinative for 'throw-stick' from
              a root meaning 'throw') is also a club (Gardiner says) as det. of
              foreign peoples.

              What goes round comes round. Have you seen the French movie where a
              businessman is playing with his boomerangs en plein air? He launches
              one, then answers his phone, and .......

              Brian Colless
              Massey University, NZ

              On 2/02/2009, at 3:33 AM, David Hall wrote:

              > Throw sticks were used for hunting birds in ancient Egypt. The
              > hunter stood atop a papyrus skiff and tried to knock down a duck or
              > goose:
              >
              > http://i-cias. com/egypt/ photos/beni_ hassan01. jpg
              >
              > A throw stick was found in King Tut's tomb:
              >
              > http://www.touregyp t.net/museum/ boomerangpage. htm
              >
              > David Q. Hall
              > dqhall59@yahoo. com
              >
              > --- On Sat, 1/31/09, Andrés Piquer Otero <erewan@terra. es> wrote:
              >
              > From: Andrés Piquer Otero <erewan@terra. es>
              > Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Wikipedia, the Boomerang, staff slings
              > To: ANE-2@yahoogroups. com
              > Date: Saturday, January 31, 2009, 1:25 PM
              >
              > Clark Whelton wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > > I'm not sure that throw sticks, such as boomerangs, were used as
              > > weapons or for hunting in the ANE.
              > >
              > > Clark Whelton
              > > New York
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              > Off the head, I recall O. Keel's "The Iconography of the Ancient Near
              > East" including a number of ANE pictorial renderings with weapons that
              > the author (or the academic sources he cites) interpret as "throwing
              > sticks", whatever that instrument is.
              >
              > Andrés Piquer Otero
              >
              >
              >
              >

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Brian Colless
              Yes, I went to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Throw_stick_(hieroglyph) (but I had to do a search to get through to it, as the bit in round brackets did not
              Message 6 of 9 , Feb 8, 2009
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                Yes, I went to
                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Throw_stick_(hieroglyph)
                (but I had to do a search to get through to it, as the bit in round
                brackets did not register, did not light up in blue)

                The word ga, 'throw-stick' is offered in a little box; interesting;
                It was already saying G before it was borrowed for the proto-alphabet?

                One surprise for me was on the Narmer Palette (which I have studied
                very closely in the past): the Horus Hawk is holding one; the King is
                wielding a 'donger' (club) to smash skulls.

                The alleged 'birthing wand' is a puzzle to me.

                Brian Colless
                Massey U, NZ


                On 8/02/2009, at 3:14 AM, David Hall wrote:

                >
                > I recall a lecture given by a medical professor about Ancient
                > Egyptian Medicine to a group of people interested in history. He
                > had a photo of a flat ivory object shaped like a boomerang that he
                > had identified as a "birthing wand." He also showed a three legged
                > stool he indicated may have been used by midwives during
                > childbirth. I went to him after the lecture and told him I thought
                > it was a throwstick. I had spent some time memorizing some of the
                > art at the Beni Hasan tombs in Middle Egypt from the early second
                > millenium.
                >
                > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Throw_stick_(hieroglyph)
                >
                > The professor was able to show a slide of some petrie dish cultures
                > on agar showing that myrhh was an antiobiotic and inhibited the
                > growth of bacteria. He indicated the Egyptians may have known about
                > its anitbiotic properties and gave evidence for AE trade with
                > Eastern Africa and India. A check of articles about the use of
                > myrhh as an antibiotic in ancient Egypt in google.com revealed more
                > proponents of the theory myrhh was used as an antiobiotic and also
                > to embalm mummies in ancient Egypt.
                >
                > David Q. Hall
                > dqhall59@...
                >
                >
                >
                > --- On Sat, 2/7/09, Brian Colless <briancolless@...> wrote:
                >
                > From: Brian Colless <briancolless@...>
                > Subject: [ANE-2] Boomerangs in ANE
                > To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
                > Date: Saturday, February 7, 2009, 12:42 AM
                >
                > It is time I responded (favourably) to this.
                >
                > Whenever I encounter boomerang-deniers in connection with the origin
                > of the letter G (gaml 'throwstick' ; not camel, as taught in Hebew
                > school!) my gentle retort is, as I said in my earlier trumpet vs bugle
                > message (31 Jan 2009):
                >
                > "I remember seeing Tutankhamon' s missiles on show in the Cairo
                > Museum,
                > with examples of Australian boomerangs for comparison; the difference
                > was that his are made of ivory."
                >
                > I also have a big picture book of *Wonders of Tutankhamun* (Crown,
                > 1978). It turns out to be the same source that David has named:
                >
                > > A throw stick was found in King Tut's tomb:
                > >
                > > http://www.touregyp t.net/museum/ boomerangpage. htm
                > >
                >
                > Actually, there was one ivory boomerang in his tomb, and some wooden
                > ones.
                > That source says that throw sticks and boomerangs were found in the
                > Annex of the tomb.
                > What is the difference?
                > Not all Australian boomerangs are 'returning' missiles, though
                > 'boomerang' implies recoiling in English usage.
                >
                > When thinking about the gamlu (Krummholz, Bumerang, von Soden; bent
                > stick, throwing-stick, Concise D) my mind plays with g-m-l as
                > connoting completion and repayment, hence the returning aspect. Is
                > this a silly idea that needs to be cleaned out of my head?
                >
                > Do the bentness and curving notions come from the boomerang and are
                > then applied to the camel? And the sickle (maggalu)?
                >
                > I note that the throw-stick was used in all periods in ancient Egypt.
                > And its hieroglyph ( T 14) is a determinative for 'throw-stick' from
                > a root meaning 'throw') is also a club (Gardiner says) as det. of
                > foreign peoples.
                >
                > What goes round comes round. Have you seen the French movie where a
                > businessman is playing with his boomerangs en plein air? He launches
                > one, then answers his phone, and .......
                >
                > Brian Colless
                > Massey University, NZ
                >
                > On 2/02/2009, at 3:33 AM, David Hall wrote:
                >
                > > Throw sticks were used for hunting birds in ancient Egypt. The
                > > hunter stood atop a papyrus skiff and tried to knock down a duck or
                > > goose:
                > >
                > > http://i-cias. com/egypt/ photos/beni_ hassan01. jpg
                > >
                > > A throw stick was found in King Tut's tomb:
                > >
                > > http://www.touregyp t.net/museum/ boomerangpage. htm
                > >
                > > David Q. Hall
                > > dqhall59@yahoo. com
                > >
                > > --- On Sat, 1/31/09, Andrés Piquer Otero <erewan@terra. es> wrote:
                > >
                > > From: Andrés Piquer Otero <erewan@terra. es>
                > > Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Wikipedia, the Boomerang, staff slings
                > > To: ANE-2@yahoogroups. com
                > > Date: Saturday, January 31, 2009, 1:25 PM
                > >
                > > Clark Whelton wrote:
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > I'm not sure that throw sticks, such as boomerangs, were used as
                > > > weapons or for hunting in the ANE.
                > > >
                > > > Clark Whelton
                > > > New York
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > >
                > > Off the head, I recall O. Keel's "The Iconography of the Ancient
                > Near
                > > East" including a number of ANE pictorial renderings with weapons
                > that
                > > the author (or the academic sources he cites) interpret as "throwing
                > > sticks", whatever that instrument is.
                > >
                > > Andrés Piquer Otero
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Trudy Kawami
                Are you talking about the Horus on the obverse? He holds a tether to the nose of the Delta rebel. Is the throw-stick ever shown in a combat rather than
                Message 7 of 9 , Feb 9, 2009
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                  Are you talking about the Horus on the obverse? He holds a tether to the
                  nose of the Delta rebel. Is the throw-stick ever shown in a "combat"
                  rather than hunting scene (usually the fowling in the marshes motif)?

                  Just curious.

                  Trudy Kawami



                  ________________________________

                  From: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                  Brian Colless
                  Sent: Sunday, February 08, 2009 10:48 PM
                  To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Boomerangs in ANE, AE (Ancient Egypt) trade etc.



                  Yes, I went to
                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Throw_stick_
                  <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Throw_stick_> (hieroglyph)
                  (but I had to do a search to get through to it, as the bit in round
                  brackets did not register, did not light up in blue)

                  The word ga, 'throw-stick' is offered in a little box; interesting;
                  It was already saying G before it was borrowed for the proto-alphabet?

                  One surprise for me was on the Narmer Palette (which I have studied
                  very closely in the past): the Horus Hawk is holding one; the King is
                  wielding a 'donger' (club) to smash skulls.

                  The alleged 'birthing wand' is a puzzle to me.

                  Brian Colless
                  Massey U, NZ




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                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Brian Colless
                  ... You are right, Trudy. I have always seen it as cord, until this idea was put into my head yesterday. Once again I have been prompted to put my own little
                  Message 8 of 9 , Feb 11, 2009
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                    On 10/02/2009, at 5:31 AM, Trudy Kawami wrote:
                    > Are you talking about the Horus on the obverse? He holds a tether to
                    > the
                    > nose of the Delta rebel.
                    >

                    You are right, Trudy.
                    I have always seen it as cord, until this idea was put into my head
                    yesterday.

                    Once again I have been prompted to put my own little piece about the
                    palette on the internet, in the ancient Egypt section of

                    http://collesseum.googlepages.com/

                    It ends thus (with an idea that came into my head about MENES):

                    Was Narmer the King Menes who (according to the priests of Memphis, as
                    reported by the Greek historian Herodotos, 5th C. B.C.E.) was the
                    first king of Egypt and the founder of Memphis.

                    Here is a thought I have had: If we read the chisel sign in the name
                    "catfish chisel" (nar mer) not as mer but as menh (menkh) "chisel",
                    and note that the Greeks used to omit h (kh) in such foreign (Hebrew)
                    names as Menahem (Greek Menaem) and Nehemyah (Greek Neemia), then
                    Greek Menes could be Egyptian Menkh, and this palette could be the
                    record of the founding of the First Dynasty of United Egypt.

                    However, it should be noted that there is another candidate with a
                    claim to be the legendary King Menes. An ivory label found at Naqada
                    (near Thebes) has a sign men beside the name 'Aha, thought to be the
                    successor of Narmer. No tomb has been found for King Narmer at Saqqara
                    (the royal burial place near Memphis) ; the oldest-known tomb there
                    belongs to 'Aha. Was Narmer only the forerunner of 'Aha, and 'Aha the
                    builder of Memphis and the founder of the First Dynasty (around 3000
                    B.C.E.)?

                    http://collesseum.googlepages.com/narmer

                    Your other question:
                    Is the throw-stick ever shown in a "combat" rather than hunting scene
                    (usually the fowling in the marshes motif)?

                    I don't know (but apparently not), and I think the Australian
                    boomerang was used for hunting animals for food, and not for fighting.

                    Brian Colless
                    Massey U, NZ
                    > Just curious.
                    >
                    > Trudy Kawami
                    >
                    (Kawami: Polynesian? Japanese? Hawaiian-Japanese?)
                    >
                    > ______________________________
                    > From: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                    > Of
                    > Brian Colless
                    > Sent: Sunday, February 08, 2009 10:48 PM
                    > To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Boomerangs in ANE, AE (Ancient Egypt) trade etc.
                    >
                    > Yes, I went to
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Throw_stick_
                    > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Throw_stick_> (hieroglyph)
                    > (but I had to do a search to get through to it, as the bit in round
                    > brackets did not register, did not light up in blue)
                    >
                    > The word ga, 'throw-stick' is offered in a little box; interesting;
                    > It was already saying G before it was borrowed for the proto-alphabet?
                    >
                    > One surprise for me was on the Narmer Palette (which I have studied
                    > very closely in the past): the Horus Hawk is holding one; the King is
                    > wielding a 'donger' (club) to smash skulls.
                    >
                    > The alleged 'birthing wand' is a puzzle to me.
                    >
                    > Brian Colless
                    > Massey U, NZ
                    >
                    >
                    > ,___



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Doug Weller
                    Hi Brian, High resolution photos of the Narmer palette here (a link from the Wikipedia article)
                    Message 9 of 9 , Feb 11, 2009
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Hi Brian,

                      High resolution photos of the Narmer palette here (a link from the
                      Wikipedia article)
                      http://xoomer.virgilio.it/francescoraf/hesyra/palettes/narmerp.htm

                      And the Wikipedia article now claims that

                      In the third register at the bottom of the palette we have a king
                      named PPP (Pepy) with a bull known as Montu commonly used in the kings
                      titulary [16] building a city with the power of Montu. [Based it says on p.72 of Gardiner's Egyptian Grammar.

                      DOug


                      Wednesday, February 11, 2009, 12:11:42 PM, you wrote:


                      > On 10/02/2009, at 5:31 AM, Trudy Kawami wrote:
                      >> Are you talking about the Horus on the obverse? He holds a tether to
                      >> the
                      >> nose of the Delta rebel.
                      >>

                      > You are right, Trudy.
                      > I have always seen it as cord, until this idea was put into my head
                      > yesterday.

                      > Once again I have been prompted to put my own little piece about the
                      > palette on the internet, in the ancient Egypt section of

                      > http://collesseum.googlepages.com/

                      > It ends thus (with an idea that came into my head about MENES):

                      > Was Narmer the King Menes who (according to the priests of Memphis, as
                      > reported by the Greek historian Herodotos, 5th C. B.C.E.) was the
                      > first king of Egypt and the founder of Memphis.

                      > Here is a thought I have had: If we read the chisel sign in the name
                      > "catfish chisel" (nar mer) not as mer but as menh (menkh) "chisel",
                      > and note that the Greeks used to omit h (kh) in such foreign (Hebrew)
                      > names as Menahem (Greek Menaem) and Nehemyah (Greek Neemia), then
                      > Greek Menes could be Egyptian Menkh, and this palette could be the
                      > record of the founding of the First Dynasty of United Egypt.

                      > However, it should be noted that there is another candidate with a
                      > claim to be the legendary King Menes. An ivory label found at Naqada
                      > (near Thebes) has a sign men beside the name 'Aha, thought to be the
                      > successor of Narmer. No tomb has been found for King Narmer at Saqqara
                      > (the royal burial place near Memphis) ; the oldest-known tomb there
                      > belongs to 'Aha. Was Narmer only the forerunner of 'Aha, and 'Aha the
                      > builder of Memphis and the founder of the First Dynasty (around 3000
                      > B.C.E.)?

                      > http://collesseum.googlepages.com/narmer

                      > Your other question:
                      > Is the throw-stick ever shown in a "combat" rather than hunting scene
                      > (usually the fowling in the marshes motif)?

                      > I don't know (but apparently not), and I think the Australian
                      > boomerang was used for hunting animals for food, and not for fighting.

                      > Brian Colless
                      > Massey U, NZ
                      >> Just curious.
                      >>
                      >> Trudy Kawami
                      >>
                      > (Kawami: Polynesian? Japanese? Hawaiian-Japanese?)
                      >>
                      >> ______________________________
                      >> From: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                      >> Of
                      >> Brian Colless
                      >> Sent: Sunday, February 08, 2009 10:48 PM
                      >> To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
                      >> Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Boomerangs in ANE, AE (Ancient Egypt) trade etc.
                      >>
                      >> Yes, I went to
                      >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Throw_stick_
                      >> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Throw_stick_> (hieroglyph)
                      >> (but I had to do a search to get through to it, as the bit in round
                      >> brackets did not register, did not light up in blue)
                      >>
                      >> The word ga, 'throw-stick' is offered in a little box; interesting;
                      >> It was already saying G before it was borrowed for the proto-alphabet?
                      >>
                      >> One surprise for me was on the Narmer Palette (which I have studied
                      >> very closely in the past): the Horus Hawk is holding one; the King is
                      >> wielding a 'donger' (club) to smash skulls.
                      >>
                      >> The alleged 'birthing wand' is a puzzle to me.
                      >>
                      >> Brian Colless
                      >> Massey U, NZ
                      >>
                      >>
                      >> ,___



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                      --
                      --
                      Doug Weller Moderator, sci.archaeology.moderated
                      Director and Moderator The Hall of Ma'at http://www.hallofmaat.com
                      Doug's Skeptical Archaeology Site: http://www.ramtops.co.uk
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