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  • theodc25
    Beatrice Hopkinson wrote: I am ... and notice you differentiate between a cooking pot versus a bowl, and ... I would say that there isn t any overarching
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 3, 2008
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      Beatrice Hopkinson wrote:
      I am
      > particularly interested in the fabrication and function of pottery
      and notice you differentiate between a cooking pot versus a bowl, and
      > wondered what your parameters were for this definition.
      >

      I would say that there isn't any overarching statement that can be
      made on the difference between the two, at least in terms of form. In
      most cases the ware will be different with bowls being more finely
      levigated and cooking pots having larger inclusions, but this is not
      always the case. In some instances bowls are decorated and pots not
      (but not always), and sometimes pots have handles and bowls do not
      (but not always and then we have to throw kraters into the equation).

      In "Ancient Pottery of Transjordan" by Hendrix, Drey, and Storjfell,
      they would label a bowl as "any vessel the opening of which is 50% or
      more of its maximum diameter, no matter the function..." and then the
      more detailed name is based on function (or rather supposed function).
      Overall, this is a difficult question and I think one would have to
      take it on a period by period basis. I would love to hear your
      opinion, as well.

      Owen Chesnut
      Ph.D. Candidate
      Andrews University
    • Rolf Furuli
      Dear list-members, In an astronomical tablet from Achaemenid times the position of the moon is described this way: ina KI 4 AM3 ar2 $a2 PA Translations of
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 4, 2008
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        Dear list-members,

        In an astronomical tablet from Achaemenid times the position of the
        moon is described this way:

        ina KI 4 AM3 ar2 $a2 PA

        Translations of these signs that I have seen are rather puzzling to
        me. So I ask for your analysis and your translation of the signs.

        The sign PA evidently is an abbreviation for PA-BIL (=the
        constellation Saggittarius). The sign ar2 is a common abbreviation
        for warkat, but related forms cannot be excluded. The first sign ina
        evidently means "in"; the moon was "in" KI 4 AM3 ar2 $a2 PA.


        Best regards,

        Rolf Furuli Ph.D
        University of Oslo
      • Rolf Furuli
        Dear list-members, In an astronomical tablet from Achaemenid times the position of the moon is described this way: ina KI 4 AM3 ar2 $a2 PA Translations of
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 8, 2008
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          Dear list-members,

          In an astronomical tablet from Achaemenid times the position of the
          moon is described this way:

          ina KI 4 AM3 ar2 $a2 PA

          Translations of these signs that I have seen are rather puzzling to
          me. So I ask for your analysis and your translation of the signs.

          The sign PA evidently is an abbreviation for PA-BIL (=the
          constellation Saggittarius). The sign ar2 is a common abbreviation
          for warkat, but related forms cannot be excluded. The first sign ina
          evidently means "in"; the moon was "in" KI 4 AM3 ar2 $a2 PA.


          Best regards,

          Rolf Furuli Ph.D
          University of Oslo
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