Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

A fragment with an inscription: Son of the High Priest

Expand Messages
  • eliot braun
    This is a link to an article describing a fragment, presumably of a sarcophagus, found near Jerusalem, and which probably dates to ca. the 1st C BCE.
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 7, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      This is a link to an article describing a fragment, presumably of a sarcophagus, found near Jerusalem, and which probably dates to ca. the 1st C BCE.

      http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1027267.html

      Eliot Braun, Ph D
      Sr. Fellow WF Albright Institute of Archaeological Research, Jerusalem
      Associate Researcher Centre de Recherche Français de Jérusalem
      PO Box 21, Har Adar 90836 Israel
      Tel 972-2-5345687, Cell 972-50-2231096
    • dp@exegesisinternational.org
      Eliot, This is a link to an article describing a fragment, presumably of a sarcophagus, found near Jerusalem, and which probably dates to ca. the 1st C BCE.
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 7, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Eliot,

        "This is a link to an article describing a fragment, presumably of a sarcophagus, found near Jerusalem, and which probably dates to ca. the 1st C BCE."

        Was this a type-o, or do you truly have grounds for attributing the find to the 1st c. BCE? The article you provided seems to attribute it to 30-70 CE, not BCE.

        Doug Petrovich
        Toronto, Canada

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Joseph I. Lauer
        The temporary URLs for the underlying IAA s press releases are http://www.antiquities.org.il/about_eng.asp?Modul_id=14 (English), and
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 7, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          The temporary URLs for the underlying IAA's press releases are
          http://www.antiquities.org.il/about_eng.asp?Modul_id=14 (English), and
          http://www.antiquities.org.il/about_heb.asp?Modul_id=13 (Hebrew).
          The English title of the IAA's release is "A Fragment of a Sarcophagus
          was Discovered on which is Carved the Inscription: 'Ben HaCohen HaGadol'".
          At the end of the releases is a link to three pictures in ZIP files,
          which may be opened in one's PC and viewed (and enlarged) on the Windows
          Picture and Fax Viewer.
          The URL for those links is
          http://www.antiquities.org.il/images/press/iaa_ben_hakohen.zip
          Those pictures are: (1) fragment of the sarcophagus cover; (2) a
          close-up of the inscription; (3) a general photo of the excavation.
          I referred to the IAA's "13" and "14" URLs as "temporary" because they
          are used and re-used for releases as items come up and, on occasion, those
          items may be seen, with URLs in serial order and sometimes in modified form,
          in the regular press release areas of the IAA's website. Such a press
          release has not (yet) been posted by the IAA in Hebrew or in English.
          A part of the IAA's English release is at the Israel Ministry of Foreign
          Affairs site at
          http://www.mfa.gov.il/MFA/History/Early+History+-+Archaeology/Excavations_north_Jerusalem_reveal_sarcophagus_fragment_6-Oct-2008.htm
          In addition to the Ha'aretz article noted by Dr. Braun at
          http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/pages/ShArt.jhtml?itemNo=1027267,
          the find was the subject of an Arutz Sheva report at
          http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/127872
          The find has also been the subject of many blog postings and comments,
          including at
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/biblical-studies/message/18838
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/biblical-studies/message/18847
          http://jwest.wordpress.com/2008/10/06/the-grave-of-the-high-priests-son/
          http://paleojudaica.blogspot.com/2008_10_05_archive.html#2421613708181552178
          http://blog.bibleplaces.com/2008/10/son-of-high-priest-sarcophagus-fragment.html
          http://www.ritmeyer.com/2008/10/06/son-of-the-high-priest/
          http://bibliahebraica.blogspot.com/2008/10/new-discovery-inscribed-sarchophagus.html
          http://www.antoniolombatti.it/B/Blog10-08/Voci/2008/10/6_Sarcophagus_of_son_of_High_Priest_found.html
          Joseph I. Lauer
          Brooklyn, New York
        • Jack Kilmon
          ... From: eliot braun To: ANE Sent: Tuesday, October 07, 2008 8:48 AM Subject: [ANE-2] A fragment with an
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 7, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "eliot braun" <eliotbraun@...>
            To: "ANE" <ANE-2@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Tuesday, October 07, 2008 8:48 AM
            Subject: [ANE-2] A fragment with an inscription: Son of the High Priest


            > This is a link to an article describing a fragment, presumably of a
            > sarcophagus, found near Jerusalem, and which probably dates to ca. the 1st
            > C BCE.
            >
            > http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1027267.html
            >
            > Eliot Braun, Ph D
            > Sr. Fellow WF Albright Institute of Archaeological Research, Jerusalem
            > Associate Researcher Centre de Recherche Français de Jérusalem
            > PO Box 21, Har Adar 90836 Israel
            > Tel 972-2-5345687, Cell 972-50-2231096


            They are reporting a date between 30-70 CE but I believe the script is
            Hasmonean and dates from 125-70-ish BCE but the odd gimel may even point to
            the Hellenistic period. The High Priests were:

            Hellenistic Period
            Onias I (309-265)
            Simon I
            Eleazar 283-246)
            Manasseh
            Onias II (246-221)
            Simon II (221-204)
            Onias II 175ish
            Jason 175-172
            Menelaus (172-162)
            Alcimus 162-159)


            Hasmonean Period
            Jonathan (152-142)
            Simon (142-134)
            John Hyrcanus (134-104)
            Aristobulus I (104-103)
            Alexander Jannaeus (103-76)
            Hyrcanus II (76-67, 63-40)
            Aristobulus II (67-63)
            Antigonus (40-37)

            By Herod the Great:
            Ananel (37-36 BCE)
            Aristobulus ((35 BCE)
            Jesus, son of Phabes
            Simon (also Herod's Father in Law)
            Matthias (5-4 BCE)
            Joseph
            Joazar (4 BCE)
            By Archelaus between 4 BCE and 6 CE
            Eleazar
            Jesus, son of Sie
            Judea becomes a province/prefecture
            By Quirinius ("Cyrenius")
            Annas 6 CE-15 CE
            By Valerius Gratus, prefect from 15 CE to 26 CE
            Ishmael (15 CE to 16 CE)
            Eleazar, son of Annas (16 CE-17 CE)
            Simon son of Kamithos (17 CE to 18 CE)
            Joseph Caiaphas (Yahosef bar Qayafa), son in law of Annas (18 CE to 36
            CE)
            By Vitellius (35-39 CE):
            Jonathan son of Annas (36-37 CE)
            Theophilos son of Annas (37-40CE)
            By Agrippa I (41-44 CE)
            Simon Kantheras (40-43 CE)
            Matthias son of Annas (43 CE)
            Elionaios
            By Herod of Chalcis (44-48 CE)
            Joseph
            Ananias (47-59 CE)
            By Agrippa II (50-100 CE)
            Ishmael (59-61 CE)
            Joseph Kabi (61-62 CE)
            Ananos son of Annas (62 CE for 3 months)
            Jesus son of Damnaios (62-63 CE)
            Jesus son of Gamaliel (63-65 CE)
            Matthias son of Theophilos (65-67 CE)
            During War Phannias.

            The inscription is BN haKoHen HaGaDwL. One epigrapher thinks it is possible
            that the BN, which lies close to the broken edge, could be the final two
            letters of a name hence the sarcophagus of the HP himself. Maybe if we
            Semitize some of the Greek names, there may be a candidate.

            My point, however, is I think the script does not belong to the 30-70 CE
            period.

            Jack

            Jack Kilmon
            SanAntonio, TX
          • Jim West
            I d be interested in hearing your explanation of the gimel in gadol . ... ++++++ Jim West, ThD http://jwest.wordpress.com - Blog
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 7, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              I'd be interested in hearing your explanation of the gimel in 'gadol'.

              Jack Kilmon wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              > My point, however, is I think the script does not belong to the 30-70 CE
              > period.
              >
              > Jack
              >
              > Jack Kilmon
              > SanAntonio, TX
              >











              ++++++

              Jim West, ThD

              http://jwest.wordpress.com - Blog
              http://sites.google.com/site/biblicalstudiesresources/ - Biblical Studies Resources
            • Jack Kilmon
              That Gimel looks somewhat like one I have seen in earlier Qumran texts like 4QDaniel (125ishBCE) but it also looks very Greeky to me as is the architecture
              Message 6 of 9 , Oct 7, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                That Gimel looks somewhat like one I have seen in earlier Qumran texts like
                4QDaniel (125ishBCE) but it also looks very "Greeky" to me as is the
                architecture of the sarc lid. Although I am weighing in for a 125-100 BCE
                date I would not be surprised if it goes back further, perhaps to the
                Hellenistic period. I am curious about the serifs though, Jim, which I
                usually attribute to late Hasmonean and I have seen similar on ossuarial
                inscriptions, Rahmani #75 for example.

                Jack

                Jack Kilmon
                San Antonio, TX


                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Jim West" <jwest@...>
                To: <ANE-2@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Tuesday, October 07, 2008 10:34 AM
                Subject: Re: [ANE-2] A fragment with an inscription: Son of the High Priest


                > I'd be interested in hearing your explanation of the gimel in 'gadol'.
                >
                > Jack Kilmon wrote:
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> My point, however, is I think the script does not belong to the 30-70 CE
                >> period.
                >>
                >> Jack
                >>
                >> Jack Kilmon
                >> SanAntonio, TX
              • eliot braun
                It was neither a typo nor intended to express an opinion. It is probably just a mistake on my part, although it could, as far as my limited understanding goes,
                Message 7 of 9 , Oct 7, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  It was neither a typo nor intended to express an opinion. It is probably just a mistake on my part, although it could, as far as my limited understanding goes, be dated to either 1st century.  Sorry.

                  Eliot Braun, Ph D

                  Sr. Fellow WF Albright Institute of Archaeological Research, Jerusalem

                  Associate Researcher Centre de Recherche Français de Jérusalem

                  PO Box 21, Har Adar 90836 Israel

                  Tel 972-2-5345687, Cell 972-50-2231096

                  --- On Tue, 10/7/08, dp@... <dp@...> wrote:
                  From: dp@... <dp@...>
                  Subject: [ANE-2] Re: A fragment with an inscription: Son of the High Priest
                  To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Tuesday, October 7, 2008, 4:03 PM











                  Eliot,



                  "This is a link to an article describing a fragment, presumably of a sarcophagus, found near Jerusalem, and which probably dates to ca. the 1st C BCE."



                  Was this a type-o, or do you truly have grounds for attributing the find to the 1st c. BCE? The article you provided seems to attribute it to 30-70 CE, not BCE.



                  Doug Petrovich

                  Toronto, Canada



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





























                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • David Hall
                  The tomb of the high priest Caiphas was found in Peace Forest below the Haas Promenade.  The Caiphas ossuary contained some very detailed geometric carvings
                  Message 8 of 9 , Oct 7, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    The tomb of the high priest Caiphas was found in Peace Forest below the Haas Promenade.  The Caiphas ossuary contained some very detailed geometric carvings resembling pinwheels or flowers.  There were 12 ossuaries found in the tomb.
                     
                    A partial list of High Priests:
                     
                    Simeon a.k.a. Boethus (22-5 B.C.)
                    Mattaiah Ben Theophilus (5-4 B.C.)
                    Joazar (4 B.C.)
                     
                    Annas (6-15 A.D.)
                    Caiphas (18-37 A.D.)
                     
                    Theophilus (37 A.D.)
                     
                    One of two Sadducean High Priests -- Ishmael Ben Phiabi II (up to 62 A.D.)
                     
                    Joshua Ben Gamaliel (63-65 A.D.)
                    Matthias (65 A.D.)
                     
                    after J. Joachim et al.
                     
                    David Q. Hall 
                    dqhall59@...


                    --- On Tue, 10/7/08, eliot braun <eliotbraun@...> wrote:

                    From: eliot braun <eliotbraun@...>
                    Subject: [ANE-2] A fragment with an inscription: Son of the High Priest
                    To: "ANE" <ANE-2@yahoogroups.com>
                    Date: Tuesday, October 7, 2008, 9:48 AM






                    This is a link to an article describing a fragment, presumably of a sarcophagus, found near Jerusalem, and which probably dates to ca. the 1st C BCE.

                    http://www.haaretz com/hasen/ spages/1027267. html

                    Eliot Braun, Ph D
                    Sr. Fellow WF Albright Institute of Archaeological Research, Jerusalem
                    Associate Researcher Centre de Recherche Français de Jérusalem
                    PO Box 21, Har Adar 90836 Israel
                    Tel 972-2-5345687, Cell 972-50-2231096
                  • Joseph I. Lauer
                    The Jerusalem Post has a link to a two-minute IBA video about the discovery of the remnant of a covering of a sarcophagus with the (translated) inscription
                    Message 9 of 9 , Oct 7, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      The Jerusalem Post has a link to a two-minute IBA video about the
                      discovery of the "remnant of a covering of a sarcophagus" with the
                      (translated) inscription "son of the High Priest".
                      The narrator mentions the belief that the High Priest officiated at the
                      Temple between the years 30 and 70 CE.
                      The video is entitled "Archaeological dig reveals big find" and
                      sub-captioned "Jerusalem unveils 2nd Temple fragment with inscription 'Son
                      of High Priest'."
                      The video's long URL is:
                      http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=JPost/Page/VideoPlayer&cid=1194419829128&videoId=1222017491590
                      It appears (at least to me) from a side view of the inscribed cover in
                      the video that the reading is "ben" and that it is not the end of a name, as
                      there is room for a letter or letters after the break in the stone.
                      Joseph I. Lauer
                      Brooklyn, New York
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.