Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [ANE-2] RE additions to tlenai, talal &c

Expand Messages
  • Michael F. Lane
    Mata -- I m still not following. To take just two examples from Arabic, atla3a (Form IV, where I use 3 for 3ayn; maSdar -- itlaa3un) means to crane one s
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 20 8:59 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      Mata --

      I'm still not following.

      To take just two examples from Arabic,

      'atla3a (Form IV, where I use 3 for 3ayn; maSdar -- 'itlaa3un) means "to
      crane one's neck, to stretch out."

      Tala3a (Form I; maSdar -- Tuluu3un or maTla3un) means "to rise up, arise."

      In contrast, the principal sense of IE *tel(-H)- seems to be "bearing,
      carrying (weight)."

      The possibility of a borrowing from a Semitic language into Greek is
      possible, which loan word was then interpreted with the connotations of
      tle:nai, tellein, etc.; but a true etymological relationship seems quite
      out of the question.

      -- Michael Lane
      Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County

      > Michael,
      >
      > Well I was wondering. Presumably the connexion,
      > if there be one, is remote since it would bridge
      > Indo-European and Semitic sources. It is merely
      > the semantic overlap between the roots sll, tll, swl
      > and maybe a few others and PIE *tel- and the
      > evident similarity in root & stem consonants that
      > engendered my curiosity. The two domains described
      > by PIE *tll, on the one hand & the groups/t + ll, and
      > perhaps variants in secundum, tertium infirmae (swl,
      > slw, twl, tl3 &c - I haven't tried to exhaustively ferret
      > them out - maybe there are variants in s/t + rr ?), on the
      > other hand, have considerable semantic overlap it seems
      > to me. The ideas of rising, lifing, carrying, suspending
      > are common to both groups, so the idea of a comparison of
      > the two naturally arises for me. Maybe there is a common
      > Sumerian source ? ila ? Something of the sort was my
      > thought when I posted my query to the list. So following
      > my own curiosity I came to this place where too my
      > ability to criticize these thoughts drops off rapidly -
      > thus the post to the list.
      >
      > I don't find a hieroglyphic source for Coptic tal though
      > this root and its variants seem widely enough spread in
      > Semitic (there are a bunch of attestations I didn't and
      > haven't cited). I assume Coptic tal is from a Semitic
      > source.
      >
      > I don't have the best resources to hand either, I don't
      > have Crum available to me for instance, or any better
      > source for Hittite than Sturtevant's old glossary from
      > 1936. Meanwhile "Atlantis" has inspired all sorts of
      > phantasies, perhaps to be included are my philological
      > conjectures ?
      >
      > Best regards,
      >
      > Mata
      > - -
      >
      > Mata Kimasitayo
      > Kimasita~aT~Bloomington~In~Us
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      >
      > From: Michael F. Lane
      > To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Friday, August 15, 2008 2:43 PM
      > Subject: Re: [ANE-2] additions to tlênai, tâlal &c
      >
      > Mata,
      >
      > I'm not following you. Tle:nai, tellein, etc. are clearly derived from
      an
      > PIE root/stem *tel(-H2) / tl(-eH2) / tL-H2- (where L is sonant l), as
      you
      > suggest.
      >
      > What connection do you think there is with the Semitic triliteral t-l-l?
      >
      > Michael Lane
      > --
      > Dr Michael Franklin Lane
      > Assistant Professor (adjunct)
      > Ancient Studies Department
      > University of Maryland, Baltimore County
      > Fine Arts Building, Room 452
      > 1000 Hilltop Circle
      > Baltimore, MD 21250, USA
      > Tel. +1-410-455-6265 / Fax +1-410-455-1027
      > Odd that the moderators let my last post alone.
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >


      --
      Dr Michael Franklin Lane
      Ancient Studies Department
      University of Maryland, Baltimore County
      Fine Arts Building, Room 452
      1000 Hilltop Circle
      Baltimore, MD 21250, USA
      Tel. +1-410-455-6265 / Fax +1-410-455-1027
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.