Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [ANE-2] Early farming

Expand Messages
  • Joe Zias
    A few years back, Dr. Giraud Foster MD who made quite a contribution to the field of archaeology/anthropology, probably because he never studied it formally,
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 15 11:02 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      A few years back, Dr. Giraud Foster MD who made quite a contribution to the field of archaeology/anthropology, probably because he never studied it formally, did a study of animals from cultic areas in the ANE and found that most of those that he was able to sex were young males and he was able to show a correlation between culling the young males and spring festivals which enabled the folks here in the NE to deal with the problem of too many males as well as appeasing the gods at the same time.

      Joe

      Joe Zias www.joezias.com
      Anthropology/Paleopathology

      Science and Antiquity Group - Jerusalem
      Jerusalem, Israel

      --- On Thu, 8/14/08, David Hall <dqhall59@...> wrote:
      From: David Hall <dqhall59@...>
      Subject: [ANE-2] Early farming
      To: "ANE" <ane-2@yahoogroups.com>
      Date: Thursday, August 14, 2008, 10:01 PM











      A study of Zawi Chemi Shanidar hypothesized sheep domestication about 11,000 B.P. due to the large increase in the number of immature sheep and goat bones found at the site to indicate a reliance on the species and perhaps the keeping of flocks.  It is a controversial piece of evidence; not enough to satisfy some critics.

       

      In some areas male lambs were culled after the rainy season and wilting of the pasture.  Dairy flocks of sheep and/or goats contain more females than males.  The sheep and goats gave milk and milk byproducts such as butter or cheese.  A few rams were able to mate with a greater number of ewes to assure the survival of the flock.  The goat gave milk more months per year, and produced more milk per year than the sheep.  The sheep gave wool.  By keeping the sheep with the best wool; specialized domestication continued. 

       

      The presence of stone grinders/querns at a site may not prove the domestication of grain had taken place as wild cereals such as einkorn or emmer grew in the highlands of Anatolia before they were domesticated (sown).  Hunter gatherers were able to gather substantial quantities of wild grain where they had not sown.  Some form of diligence eventually resulted in hand broadcast seeding, and selection of the better seeds for replanting.  The presence of the charred remains of hybrid grain seeds in the firepits of abandoned settlements was given as evidence of the domestication of grain.  (After James Mellart' s field observations of wild grain and the study of carbonized grains from fire pits.)    

       

      David Q. Hall

      dqhall59@yahoo. com 



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


























      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.