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Re: [ANE-2] Goddess of Pottery?

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  • sbudin@camden.rutgers.edu
    Many thanks to Trudy and Victor for their help and suggestions concerning the pottery iconography. I ve now had a chance to see some cleaner pictures of the
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 28 7:07 AM
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      Many thanks to Trudy and Victor for their help and suggestions
      concerning the pottery iconography. I've now had a chance to see some
      cleaner pictures of the seals in question, and it would seem that the
      characters in question are not actually contrusting the vessels but
      are nevertheless handling them in some way. Of the four
      Akkadian-period seals showing a goddess (as opposed to a mortal woman)
      with a child on the lap, at least three have such vessel imagery (the
      fourth shows a heafty incense burner, and may have been seen to have
      had a similar meaning?). There does appear to be some connection
      between the kourotrophic goddess and vessels, and the best suggestion
      I can come up with at the moment is an oblique reference to Enki and
      the creation of humanity (represented by the child upon the lap) from
      clay.

      Many thanks for all on-line help!
      Stephanie Budin




      Quoting victor avigdor hurowitz <victor@...>:

      > I can't check out the reference at the moment but CAD P 440 s.v. pitqu 1
      > contains the following:
      >
      > a$ri ellu...agurru pitiq (d)BAHA2R e$$i$ ibnima,
      > he rebuilt the sacred place with fired bricks, the structure of (the
      > potter god) DN OECT 1 pl. 29 W-B 1922,190:3 (A$$ur-etel-ilani).
      > So there is a "potter god" written dBAHA2R
      >
      > Check also CAD P 23 s.v. paharu (potter) e) where we have a dBAHA2R=Ea $a
      > pahari CT 25 48:7 and upattiq Ea paharu Hunger Uruk 27:2', and most
      > important dNUN.UR4.RA BAHA2R.GAL.AN.NA.KEx(KID): dMIN paharu rabu $a Ani
      > (Walker and Dick SAALT 1 108:65f). In this text Walker and Dick translate
      > dNUN.UR4.RA as Nunurra and on p. 111 n. 115 give a reference to 5R 51 iii
      > 71 f which looks like a god list which equates Nunurra lugal
      > NAM.-I$IB-BA-KE with Ea bel i$ipputi, Ea the patron of the purification
      > craft.
      > Summary - there is a dBAHAR and there is a god Nunurra who are either an
      > aspect of Ea/Enki or a member of his retinue.
      > Victor Hurowitz
      > BGU
      >
      >
      >
      > On Tue, 25 Mar 2008 sbudin@... wrote:
      >
      >> Greetings, All!
      >>
      >> Was there a Mesopotamian goddess associated with pottery? I have
      >> come across a small number of Akkadian period cylinder seals showing a
      >> seated goddess and, to the other side of the scene, either a person
      >> constructing a ceramic pot, or several such pots behind the goddess in
      >> question.
      >>
      >> Many thanks in advance!
      >> Stephanie Budin
      >>
      >>
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
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