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Hazor Museum

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  • Sam WOLFF
    The museum at Kibbutz Ayelet Ha-Shachar, located opposite Tel Hazor, is experiencing difficulties, not only as a result of a recent earthquake that damaged
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 3, 2008
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      The museum at Kibbutz Ayelet Ha-Shachar, located opposite Tel Hazor, is experiencing difficulties, not only as a result of a recent earthquake that damaged many artifacts, but also due to the lack of visitors due, in no small part, to a new road that bypasses the site and the museum.

      See http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/959940.html

      Sam Wolff
      Jerusalem
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    • Joseph I. Lauer
      Sam Wolff wrote about the difficulties being experienced by the Tel Hatzor Museum, and noted an Ha aretz English language article about it ( Earthquake damages
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 3, 2008
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        Sam Wolff wrote about the difficulties being experienced by the Tel
        Hatzor Museum, and noted an Ha'aretz English language article about it
        ("Earthquake damages rare artifacts - and no one knew") at
        http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/pages/ShArt.jhtml?itemNo=959940
        A Hebrew version of that article, with two pictures, may be found at
        http://www.haaretz.co.il/hasite/pages/ShArt.jhtml?itemNo=959763
        On February 27, 2008, The Jerusalem Post published a brief article
        concerning this occurrence ("Hundreds of archeological artifacts damaged in
        recent quake") at
        http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?cid=1204127193525&pagename=JPost/JPArticle/ShowFull
        or
        http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=JPost/JPArticle/ShowFull&cid=1204127193525
        Another Hebrew language article on the subject, with one picture, was
        published on-line by MSN on February 29, 2008 at
        http://news.msn.co.il/news/BusinessCommunication/Environment/200802/20080229141001.htm
        The pictures may also be viewed at the following URLs:
        http://www.haaretz.co.il/hasite/images/printed/P020308/a.a.0203.430.1.9.jpg
        [Caption (translated) from Ha'aretz [Hebrew]: Broken vessels in the Tel
        Hatzor Museum, last week. Difficult restoration work.]
        http://www.haaretz.co.il/hasite/images/printed/P020308/a.a.0203.430.2.9.jpg
        http://news.msn.co.il/NR/rdonlyres/D55A9977-B0E9-4CD2-A65D-730AD99AF9A7/334256/.jpg
        [Caption (translated) from MSN [Hebrew]: The damage in the Museum]
        Joseph I. Lauer
        Brooklyn, New York
      • David Hall
        I stopped at the Hazor Museum in July of 2006 before the conflict in Lebanon to find it was chained and locked shut. The antiquities museum at Arad was
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 4, 2008
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          I stopped at the Hazor Museum in July of 2006 before the conflict in Lebanon to find it was chained and locked shut. The antiquities museum at Arad was closed. The antiquities museum at Yafo/Joppa was also closed. One presumed continued violence and high fuel costs have reduced the volume of tourist traffic in Israel causing museum closures.

          There was an earthquake in 1837 that was reported to have killed hundreds in Safed and Tiberius. It was felt as far away as the Negev.

          David Q. Hall
          dqhall59@...


          "Joseph I. Lauer" <josephlauer@...> wrote:

          Sam Wolff wrote about the difficulties being experienced by the Tel
          Hatzor Museum, and noted an Ha'aretz English language article about it
          ("Earthquake damages rare artifacts - and no one knew") at
          http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/pages/ShArt.jhtml?itemNo=959940
          A Hebrew version of that article, with two pictures, may be found at
          http://www.haaretz.co.il/hasite/pages/ShArt.jhtml?itemNo=959763
          On February 27, 2008, The Jerusalem Post published a brief article
          concerning this occurrence ("Hundreds of archeological artifacts damaged in
          recent quake") at
          http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?cid=1204127193525&pagename=JPost/JPArticle/ShowFull
          or
          http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=JPost/JPArticle/ShowFull&cid=1204127193525
          Another Hebrew language article on the subject, with one picture, was
          published on-line by MSN on February 29, 2008 at
          http://news.msn.co.il/news/BusinessCommunication/Environment/200802/20080229141001.htm
          The pictures may also be viewed at the following URLs:
          http://www.haaretz.co.il/hasite/images/printed/P020308/a.a.0203.430.1.9.jpg
          [Caption (translated) from Ha'aretz [Hebrew]: Broken vessels in the Tel
          Hatzor Museum, last week. Difficult restoration work.]
          http://www.haaretz.co.il/hasite/images/printed/P020308/a.a.0203.430.2.9.jpg
          http://news.msn.co.il/NR/rdonlyres/D55A9977-B0E9-4CD2-A65D-730AD99AF9A7/334256/.jpg
          [Caption (translated) from MSN [Hebrew]: The damage in the Museum]
          Joseph I. Lauer
          Brooklyn, New York






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        • Doug Petrovich
          David, I stopped at the Hazor Museum in July of 2006 before the conflict in Lebanon to find it was chained and locked shut. All you had to do was walk/drive
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 4, 2008
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            David,

            "I stopped at the Hazor Museum in July of 2006 before the conflict in Lebanon to find it was chained and locked shut."

            All you had to do was walk/drive across the road to the tel, approach the gate, and speak to Hussein, the IAA employee who guards the entrance to the tel during the dig season. He would have taken you to the museum and opened it up for you to explore. So next time, do not give up so easily.

            You are correct about the reasons for the tourist drop. My most amazing stop last summer was at Jericho, where I was THE ONLY ONE at the tel. Westerners are under the greatly-mistaken assumption that Zone-A sites such as Jericho are completely unsafe and dangerous because of the entire lack of Israeli presence.

            While those with Israeli passports are forbidden to cross the checkpoint on the "border", foreigners can freely enter and exit. You just have to have a rental car that allows you to enter the territories.

            Once inside, visitors would be amazed to see how warmly they are received by the Arabs who are just dying for tourists. We ate lunch in a gigantic restaurant with an attached pool, but were so sad to be the ONLY patrons of the restaurant during the lunch hour.

            So, despite the press, it is "an ANEer's market" on the tels at the sites in the Holy Land.

            Doug Petrovich
            Laguna Hills, CA


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • David Hall
            Thanks Doug. The Hazor museum visit was supposed to be included with the price of visiting Tel Hazor. Was in the museum some years ago. I too was able to go
            Message 5 of 5 , Mar 4, 2008
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              Thanks Doug. The Hazor museum visit was supposed to be included with the price of visiting Tel Hazor. Was in the museum some years ago. I too was able to go to Jericho except during worse parts of the Infitada when an Israeli tank was at the entrance to Jericho and the line of drivers waiting to get in was too long. Numerous museums in Israel were yet open: Jerusalem museums, the Sephoris museum, Tel Dor museum, Tel Aviv museums, visitors center at Avdat, Qumran visitors center, Timnah Mines visitors center, Capernaum archaeology garden, the Golan museum at Qatzrin, Haipha Maritime and Antiquities Museum, and probably other museums. The Ekron Philistine museum at Tel Miqne used to have regular hours. Currently you might need Hebrew skills to get someone in the village there to let you in.

              There were at least one Christian Arab guide with English fluency who was able to get people into various hard to reach parts of the West Bank. At some border crossings one might only cross on foot and might need to continue by taxi. I discovered some agricultural terraces and watchtowers currently being used as olive gardens with a guide. Later in the same trip I drove through the border crossing near Ariel and took the Nablaus-Rameleh Rd. to Bethel (Ephraim) without a guide. The road was patrolled by the Israeli army. Would not advise going into the back country without a guide. Even with a guide one might find reason to be very wary.

              David Q. Hall


              Doug Petrovich <nbtsdp@...> wrote:
              David,

              "I stopped at the Hazor Museum in July of 2006 before the conflict in Lebanon to find it was chained and locked shut."

              All you had to do was walk/drive across the road to the tel, approach the gate, and speak to Hussein, the IAA employee who guards the entrance to the tel during the dig season. He would have taken you to the museum and opened it up for you to explore. So next time, do not give up so easily.

              You are correct about the reasons for the tourist drop. My most amazing stop last summer was at Jericho, where I was THE ONLY ONE at the tel. Westerners are under the greatly-mistaken assumption that Zone-A sites such as Jericho are completely unsafe and dangerous because of the entire lack of Israeli presence.

              While those with Israeli passports are forbidden to cross the checkpoint on the "border", foreigners can freely enter and exit. You just have to have a rental car that allows you to enter the territories.

              Once inside, visitors would be amazed to see how warmly they are received by the Arabs who are just dying for tourists. We ate lunch in a gigantic restaurant with an attached pool, but were so sad to be the ONLY patrons of the restaurant during the lunch hour.

              So, despite the press, it is "an ANEer's market" on the tels at the sites in the Holy Land.

              Doug Petrovich
              Laguna Hills, CA

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              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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