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Re: [ANE-2] Re: new Iron II seals from Jerusalem

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  • sbudin@camden.rutgers.edu
    It is *possible*, but I doubt it. When the branch first shows up in the Levantine iconography, it is from Egypt, and the nude female (sometimes just a
    Message 1 of 14 , Feb 29, 2008
      It is *possible*, but I doubt it. When the branch first shows up
      in the Levantine iconography, it is from Egypt, and the nude female
      (sometimes just a Hathoric head) is likewise Egyptian. I believe that
      this image then evolves/transforms into the gold foil images of
      women's head + leaf/tree + pubic triangle, but there is continued
      ambiguity as to her identity. Dever identifies her as Asherah (_Did
      God Have Wife_), but I'm not so sure. Of the images I would consider
      to be Asherah, the seated goddess or, possibly, the Judean Pillar
      Figurine, there is no leaf imagery. Furthermore, the leaf shows up
      without accompanying female iconography, and sometimes even alone,
      possibly as a good-luck charm. Finally, the leaf could be schamtic
      version of something like the tree of life, with its own set of
      associations. If there is any connection with Asherah, it would be
      through her own associations with trees, but in this instance (the
      bulla) it would perhaps be better to consider alternate hypotheses.

      -Stephanie Budin




      Quoting Jack Kilmon <jkilmon@...>:

      > The branch could be symbolic of Asherah?
      >
      > Jack Kilmon
      >
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: <sbudin@...>
      > To: <ANE-2@yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2008 8:54 AM
      > Subject: RE: [ANE-2] Re: new Iron II seals from Jerusalem
      >
      >
      >> FWIW, the branch or frond motif shows up in Levantine iconography
      >> since the MBA, at least partially resulting from contacts with Egypt.
      >> It's earliest use was, in fact, on seals and amulets, sometimes in
      >> images with wild animals (who often eat fronds, I guess), and often
      >> framing forward-facing nude females. Silvia Schroer has argued that
      >> the Egyptian branch motif refers to notions of rejeneration in
      >> Egyptian iconography, and this concept came north with the image.
      >> Since I study goddess iconography, this is what I know best, so I can
      >> at least note that the brach image continues to be associated with
      >> female iconography into the LBA, especially on the gold foil "Goddess
      >> Head" medallions which show a female head with a Hathoric hair-style,
      >> a pubic triangle, and often a branch between the two. Less
      >> iconographic, I know of at least one battle scene that uses similar
      >> fronds as a filler motif. Some of these things are illustrated in
      >> Keel and Uehlinger's _Gods, Goddesses and Images of God_ book, pp. 21,
      >> 30, and 70, and there is some general discussion of "Branch Goddesses"
      >> on pg. 99 (all accessible on Google Books).
      >>
      >> All Best!
      >> Stephanie Budin
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> Quoting victor <victor@...>:
      >>
      >>> Thank you. The motif definitely fills space, but the question remains, as
      >>> it
      >>> always does with such thing, is this "simply decoration" or is it
      >>> meaningful
      >>> decoration?
      >>>
      >>> Victor Hurowitz
      >>>
      >>> BGU
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> _____
      >>>
      >>> From: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
      >>> lmlkes
      >>> Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2008 1:08 PM
      >>> To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
      >>> Subject: [ANE-2] Re: new Iron II seals from Jerusalem
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> Dear Dr. Hurowitz, Hi!!! Dr. Nahman Avigad calls this a branch motif
      >>> space filler in Hebrew Bullae From the Time Of Jeremiah, Bullae nos.
      >>> 20,34,42b, etc. So you are dead on. It could be a tree or a palm
      >>> branch. The alef is odd. It looks more like a Waw.
      >>> With Much Gratitude,
      >>> Sincerely Yours,
      >>> Mike Welch
      >>> Deltona, Florida
      >>>
      >>> --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups. <mailto:ANE-2%40yahoogroups.com> com, victor
      >>> avigdor hurowitz <victor@...>
      >>> wrote:
      >>>>
      >>>>
      >>>> Thank you Sam for this link. Can anyone inform us about the object
      >>> on the
      >>>> lower register, right which looks like a stylized tree?
      >>>> Also, although I'm no expert, the alef looks a bit funny to me. Is
      >>> this
      >>>> typical of the 8th century? I could look at a chart, but I"m sure
      >>> there's
      >>>> someone out there in ANEland who can do the honors without a chart.
      >>>> Best,
      >>>> Victor Hurowitz
      >>>> BGU
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>
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