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Re: [ANE-2] Mazar reverses her reading

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  • Yitzhak Sapir
    ... Let me help you out with the following links: On the reading $lmt, the following are all posts by scholars on the subject: Jan 17 - Peter van der Veen -
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 31, 2008
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      On Jan 31, 2008 3:40 PM, Steven Feldman wrote:
      > I'd like to thank Chris Heard for the point he makes; we have modified
      > the title of our section on the Mazar seal. We hope to keep adding
      > scholars' comments on the matter and will soon post a very informative
      > piece on the seal by Ryan Byrne. Ryan, too, reads the inscription as
      > Shlomit; he questions, however, Mazar's date for the inscription and
      > her interpretation of the crescent symbol, so the seal still seems to
      > me controversial even if the reading of the inscription appears to be
      > settled.
      > Steven Feldman
      > Web Editor
      > Biblical Archaeology Review

      Let me help you out with the following links:
      On the reading $lmt, the following are all posts by scholars on the subject:
      Jan 17 - Peter van der Veen - http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ANE-2/message/7125
      Jan 17 - Peter van der Veen - http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ANE-2/message/7127
      Jan 17 - Christopher Rollston - http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ANE-2/message/7133
      Jan 17 - Christopher Heard - http://www.heardworld.com/higgaion/?p=896
      Jan 21 - Robert Deutch -
      http://drjimwest.wordpress.com/2008/01/20/mazar-webcast/#comment-39217
      Jan 31 - Reinhard Lehmann -
      http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/canaanite/message/64 (German)

      On the iconography, I think this seal cannot be discussed without
      comparing it at least
      to an "Ezra" seal in the Israel Museum, published 1977, and apparently
      hypothesized by various
      scholars to be of Moabite, Ammonite, or Phoenician provenance, because
      it was bought in the
      antiquities market. It would be really nice if you could put a photo
      of the "Ezra" seal on your
      website as well!
      Jan 19 - Michael Welch - http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ANE-2/message/7177

      The iconography may also appear in other places, but the above is a
      clearly relevant parallel.

      Additional interpretations of the iconography and text:
      Kevin P. Edgecomb - http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ANE-2/message/7138
      (Too good to pass over!)

      His Biblical Studies carnival for this month includes discussion of
      the seal on the blogs:
      http://www.bombaxo.com/blog/?p=482

      Yitzhak Sapir
    • dhyphenf
      Ryan Byrne s article on E. Mazar s seal is now up at: http://www.bib-arch.org/Mazar/bswbMazarByrne.asp In addition to the points I mentioned yesterday, he
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 1, 2008
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        Ryan Byrne's article on E. Mazar's seal is now up at:

        http://www.bib-arch.org/Mazar/bswbMazarByrne.asp

        In addition to the points I mentioned yesterday, he notes that this
        seal brings the number of known West Semitic seals belonging to women
        only to 20. Of those, this is only the third with provenance.

        Steven Feldman
        Web Editor
        Biblical Archaeology Review
      • Stefan Schorch
        With regard to Ryan Byrne s remark that the seal was owned by a women, the following should be kept in mind: - Apart from Shelomith , the Masoretic text knows
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 1, 2008
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          With regard to Ryan Byrne's remark that the seal was owned by a women, the following should be kept in mind:

          - Apart from "Shelomith", the Masoretic text knows of a "Shelomoth", too (Ketib in I Chr 23:9; 26:25 $LMWT). Most obviously, the seal may refer to either of the two forms.

          - Of course, Shelomit may be a female name. However, it is male at least in I Chr 23:18; 26:28. And Shelomoth refers to a male in both instances mentioned.

          - The LXX, too, contains both Salomit and Salomot (although the distribution is different from the MT), and both refer to males.

          In light of this evidence, two conclusions should be drawn:

          1. We don't know whether the owner of the seal was a certain "Shelomit" or rather "Shelomot".

          2. We don't know whether the owner was male or female.

          Stefan Schorch
          Kirchliche Hochschule Wuppertal/Bethel
          www.schorch.AT
        • Christopher Heard
          By my count, if you take MT $LMYT, $LWMYT, and $LMWT as proper names whose bearers might own a seal inscribed $LMT, the males outnumber the females two to one.
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 1, 2008
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            By my count, if you take MT $LMYT, $LWMYT, and $LMWT as proper names
            whose bearers might own a seal inscribed $LMT, the males outnumber the
            females two to one. I give more details on my Higgaion blog here:
            http://www.heardworld.com/higgaion/?p=917

            Chris Heard

            On Feb 1, 2008, at 8:52 AM, Stefan Schorch wrote:
            > With regard to Ryan Byrne's remark that the seal was owned by a
            > women, the following should be kept in mind:
            >
            > - Apart from "Shelomith", the Masoretic text knows of a "Shelomoth",
            > too (Ketib in I Chr 23:9; 26:25 $LMWT). Most obviously, the seal may
            > refer to either of the two forms.
            >
            > - Of course, Shelomit may be a female name. However, it is male at
            > least in I Chr 23:18; 26:28. And Shelomoth refers to a male in both
            > instances mentioned.
            >
            > - The LXX, too, contains both Salomit and Salomot (although the
            > distribution is different from the MT), and both refer to males.
            >
            > In light of this evidence, two conclusions should be drawn:
            >
            > 1. We don't know whether the owner of the seal was a certain
            > "Shelomit" or rather "Shelomot".
            >
            > 2. We don't know whether the owner was male or female.
            >

            --
            Christopher Heard
            Associate Professor of Religion
            Pepperdine University
            Malibu, CA 90263-4352
            Professional Site: http://faculty.pepperdine.edu/cheard
            Personal Blog: http://higgaion.heardworld.com
            Internet Research Tools: http://www.iTanakh.org
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