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Re: [ANE-2] Re: repeat visit to sites

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  • Eliot Braun
    Sherding or any removal of antiquities from sites should never be done by anyone unless she or he is licensed to do so and unless there is an archaeological
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 3, 2007
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      "Sherding" or any removal of antiquities from sites should never be done by anyone unless she or he is licensed to do so and unless there is an archaeological report published on it. Each successive removal removes something of the archaeological profile of the site and, ipso facto, diminishes it. Casual collectors should be discouraged. I would recommend, for those who still would like the thrill of discovery and the excitement of finding ancient artifacts on visits to sites to try using a a digital camera, especially with macro capabilities and take photos of objects picked up and placed back where they were found as soon as they are examined. The array of surface material is just as important as its presence on a site (see: Robert McCormick Adams' Land Behind Baghdad and the Uruk Countryside).

      My other suggestion is that, should some very special object be found and the finder is capable of overcoming the lust of collecting, that its place be noted. Then it should be turned over to whatever legal authority is in charge of the site and responsible for curating its antiquities.



      Eliot Braun, Ph D, masquerading as Dr Pangloss
      Ha-oren 12, Har Adar 90836, Israel
      Tel. 972-2-5345687 / 972-2-5704189
      Cell: 972-50-223 1096
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: arenmaeir
      To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, December 03, 2007 8:49 AM
      Subject: [ANE-2] Re: repeat visit to sites


      Clearly, one must revisit sites every few years if you want to start
      understanding it. Experienced archaeological surveyers know that to get
      a good "sherding representation" you have to return to a site several
      times during the period of a regional survey. At different times of the
      year (so as to get site exposure with different types of vegetation
      coverage, etc.) and over a period of more than a year, so as to benefit
      from various geomorphological changes. Surveys based on a one time
      visit to sites in a given region, although without a doubt revealing
      important evidence, represent only a small portion of the information
      that is available on surface. In fact, very often, surveys with the
      best information are those conducted over extended periods (in some
      cases, decades), usualy by a local afficianados, in which sites are re-
      visited time and again and one gets a truly in-depth knowledge of a
      region, even if extensive excavations are not conducted.

      Aren






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • cejo@uchicago.edu
      ... Which reminds me to remind you all of: Robert McCormick Adams: Land Behind Baghdad http://www.etana.org/abzu/coretext.pl?RC=20303 Robert McCormick Adams:
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 3, 2007
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        > ...The array of surface material is just as
        > important as its presence on a site (see: Robert McCormick Adams' Land Behind Baghdad and
        > the Uruk Countryside).

        Which reminds me to remind you all of:

        Robert McCormick Adams: Land Behind Baghdad
        http://www.etana.org/abzu/coretext.pl?RC=20303

        Robert McCormick Adams: The Uruk Countryside
        http://www.etana.org/abzu/coretext.pl?RC=20309

        Robert McCormick Adams: Heartland of cities
        http://www.etana.org/abzu/coretext.pl?RC=20243

        -Chuck Jones-
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