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Re: [ANE-2] Provenance question

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  • Rafal Kolinski
    The tomb of Ezekiel (in Arabic Thi al-Kifl) is located in the town of Al-Kifl, on the way from al-Hilla to an-Najaf, about 30 km south of al-Hilla. The
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 5, 2007
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      The tomb of Ezekiel (in Arabic Thi al-Kifl) is located in the town of Al-Kifl, on the way from al-Hilla to an-Najaf, about 30 km south of al-Hilla. The mausoleum of Thi al-Kifl and a mosque/synagogue serving as his shrine (built in XIVth cent AD) is mentioned in the small publications of SBAH "Religious Sites on Iraq" (copiled by Sabah M. Jassim), Bahgdad 1992, on pages 51-52. The building was in good shape after the 2003 war, and while in use by Arabic community, still held several inscriptions in Hebrew.
      I can provide interested persons with some pictures off-list.

      Rafal Kolinski, PhD
      Institute of Prehistory
      Adam Mickiewicz University,
      PoznaƱ, Poland

      David Hall <dqhall59@...> wrote:
      Not sure about the tablet cited, but there were some Jewish incantation bowls found at Nippur:

      http://www.geocities.com/Wellesley/Garden/4240/nippur.html

      There is also a monument supposed to be the tomb of Ezekiel at Kefir. It was documented by Loftus in the 19th century:

      http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=562&letter=E


      David Q. Hall
      dqhall59@...


      "William D. Tallman" <wdtallman@...> wrote:
      Hello,

      In pursuing a rumor that the expatriate Jerusalemites had obtained a
      place of residence outside of the city of Babylon, I was referred to an
      article by Andre Lemaire in BAR Nov/Dec 2005 "The Universal God". On
      page 58 of that issue is a photograph of a cuneiform tablet, which,
      according to Lemaire, contains a reference to "al Yahudu" as a city in
      Babylonia, "as if it were called 'New Jerusalem'".

      This artifact is given as a part of the Mousaieff collection. IIUC,
      that collection is not well regarded, and may even include forgeries.
      Does anyone know of this artifact, and if so, is it genuine? If it is,
      what is its provenance?

      Thanks all,

      William D. Tallman
      343 Fleming Drive
      Sequim, WA 98382
      (360) 681-0247

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    • Kevin P. Edgecomb
      A list member has informed me offlist that the link I included to the Matson Photo Archives doesn t work. I apologize for that. Users may search for any of
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 6, 2007
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        A list member has informed me offlist that the link I included to the Matson
        Photo Archives doesn't work. I apologize for that. Users may search for
        any of the photographs from this page:
        http://memory.loc.gov/pp/matpcquery.html

        Regards,
        Kevin P. Edgecomb
        Berkeley, California
      • William D. Tallman
        My apologies for the tardy response. My thanks to Messrs. Hall, Kolinski and Edgecomb for their responses. I appreciated the reference to the Matson Photo
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 7, 2007
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          My apologies for the tardy response.

          My thanks to Messrs. Hall, Kolinski and Edgecomb for their responses. I
          appreciated the reference to the Matson Photo Archive!

          The Ezekiel Tomb is, or was, extant as recently as a year ago, according
          to my web search. Looks like a wall and what appears to be a gate house
          has been taken down since the late 19th century, but the main structure
          seems relatively unchanged. I gather that nothing is known for certain
          about what was there during the time of the Judahite exile.

          The curse of sloppy scholarship, or in my case the lack thereof, is that
          references go missing: I cannot find the reference to a cuneiform
          tablet that recorded the yearly food(?) allotment to the Judahites after
          the death of Nebuchadrezzer II. It was reading through the translation
          of that which put me in mind of a bill of lading. There is mention of
          the allotment in Septuagint texts, but one gathers therefrom that the
          Judahite elite dined at the court.

          I wondered if the yearly list might not indicate that the allotment was
          shipped somewhere; otherwise, why record what could just as well have
          been part of the court food consumption? Hence the interest in
          determining what evidence there was/is for some external site.

          I had tentatively concluded that such a site would be located near the
          Euphrates, and would not be north of Babylon; apparently the Persians
          did not encounter it after the battle at Opis and they would not have
          been north of the line of defense that is said to have passed from the
          Euphrates to the Tigris at Opis.

          So a site south of Babylon seems reasonable, at least in this tyro's
          view.

          Lemaire's suggestion that such a site existed and was known as New
          Jerusalem seemed worth pursuing, but the image in the BAR NovDec 2005
          looked far too fresh and undamaged, and the "provenance" I knew to be a
          matter of controversy.

          In any case, thanks again to all.

          William D. Tallman
          343 Fleming Drive
          Sequim, WA 98382
          (360) 681-0247
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