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Much Temple Mount Ado About Nothing

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  • Jim West
    AFP reports today that Israeli officials cast doubt Friday over claims that remains of the second Jewish temple might have been found during work to lay pipes
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 31, 2007
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      AFP reports today that

      Israeli officials cast doubt Friday over claims that remains of the
      second Jewish temple might have been found during work to lay pipes at
      the Al-Aqsa mosque compound in Jerusalem.

      "If that was the case, the antiquities authority, which has an observer
      on site, as well as police, also monitoring the work, would have stepped
      in," said archaeologist Dan Bahat, a former excavations official in
      Jerusalem.

      On Thursday, archaeologist Gaby Barkai from Bar Ilan University told
      local television that "a massive seven metre-long (23 feet) wall" had
      been found, and urged the government to ask the Muslim religious
      authorities to stop laying pipes.

      Bahat said he would visit the site, but accused nameless archaeologists
      with a nationalist agenda of "waging a politically inspired campaign,
      systematically for several years, to strengthen Israeli control over the
      esplanade".


      Read the whole report here:

      http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5iUzxureMd9FeVLdn7COA01N4HFBA

      So perhaps earlier reports were much ado about nothing at all.


      --
      Jim West, ThD

      http://drjewest.googlepages.com/ -- Biblical Studies Resources
      http://drjimwest.wordpress.com -- Weblog
    • Yitzhak Sapir
      ... In a Israeli newspaper a few months ago, one columnist described a call to an expert a university about some question. The professor in response quoted
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 1, 2007
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        On 8/31/07, Jim West wrote:

        > AFP reports today that
        >
        > Israeli officials cast doubt Friday over claims that remains of the
        > second Jewish temple might have been found during work to lay pipes at
        > the Al-Aqsa mosque compound in Jerusalem.
        >
        > "If that was the case, the antiquities authority, which has an observer
        > on site, as well as police, also monitoring the work, would have stepped
        > in," said archaeologist Dan Bahat, a former excavations official in
        > Jerusalem.
        >
        > Bahat said he would visit the site, but accused nameless archaeologists
        > with a nationalist agenda of "waging a politically inspired campaign,
        > systematically for several years, to strengthen Israeli control over the
        > esplanade".
        >
        > So perhaps earlier reports were much ado about nothing at all.

        In a Israeli newspaper a few months ago, one columnist described a call
        to an expert a university about some question. The professor in response
        quoted Dan Margalit (a reporter/columnist) as saying that there is a
        difference between female and male professors. When asked to comment
        on, say, Morocco, a woman would say, "I'm an expert in Algeria, and even
        though it's nearby, I suggest you find someone else." A man would say,
        "I'm really an expert in Afghanistan but I'd love to come and comment."

        So, don't you think it's odd that Bahat is willing to comment on the
        finds without having come to look at the site first? His only basis of
        evidence as to whether the finds are or are not part of the Second Temple
        courtyard is the behavior of the Antiquities Authority. His accusation
        against the Antiquities Authority is really worse than Barkay's. Dr.
        Barkay and the other archaeologists only suggest that the Antiquities
        Authority is doing nothing as a tractor digs up ancient finds at a declared
        antiquities site. Dr. Bahat suggests that the Antiquities Authority is doing
        nothing because the finds are not related to Jewish history (from his point
        of view) and therefore, it's ok to use a tractor to dig them up and destroy
        them! Look again at the pictures, especially at the next to the last picture:
        http://www.echad.info/bait/new_ditchE28-08-07.htm

        For what it's worth, Bahat's own book on the history of Jerusalem
        describes a wall only during Biblical times and not afterwards,
        in the location described in the map. As for the Antiquities Authority,
        listing all the times the Antiquities Authority has stood by and done
        nothing, perjured itself in the Israeli Supreme Court to the effect that
        antiquities were not being destroyed (only to later claim that indeed
        archaeological crimes have been committed, or after earlier having
        claimed that it has little information on how antiquities are being
        handled at the site) would be far too long for a mailing list post, or
        even a newspaper article. The Authority's (as well as the Police and
        the Prosecution's) behavior in this matter has been to release little
        and sometimes misleading information in order to avoid a public
        uproar over the crimes being committed. The Israeli Supreme Court's
        position has generally been to avoid interference even in light of
        flagrant violations of the law. Dan Bahat's statement above is no more
        than continuing this policy.

        Yitzhak Sapir
      • Dave Washburn
        Considering some things that have come to light in recent years, I would consider the reputation of the IAA somewhat less than stellar. The fact (if indeed it
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 1, 2007
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          Considering some things that have come to light in recent years, I would
          consider the reputation of the IAA somewhat less than stellar. The fact
          (if indeed it is a fact) that they are doing nothing most likely means
          just that: they're doing nothing. I doubt it says much at all about the
          site.

          On Sat, September 1, 2007 10:58 am, Yitzhak Sapir wrote:
          > On 8/31/07, Jim West wrote:
          >
          >> AFP reports today that
          >>
          >> Israeli officials cast doubt Friday over claims that remains of the
          >> second Jewish temple might have been found during work to lay pipes at
          >> the Al-Aqsa mosque compound in Jerusalem.
          >>
          >> "If that was the case, the antiquities authority, which has an observer
          >> on site, as well as police, also monitoring the work, would have stepped
          >> in," said archaeologist Dan Bahat, a former excavations official in
          >> Jerusalem.
          >>
          >> Bahat said he would visit the site, but accused nameless archaeologists
          >> with a nationalist agenda of "waging a politically inspired campaign,
          >> systematically for several years, to strengthen Israeli control over the
          >> esplanade".
          >>
          >> So perhaps earlier reports were much ado about nothing at all.
          >
          > In a Israeli newspaper a few months ago, one columnist described a call
          > to an expert a university about some question. The professor in response
          > quoted Dan Margalit (a reporter/columnist) as saying that there is a
          > difference between female and male professors. When asked to comment
          > on, say, Morocco, a woman would say, "I'm an expert in Algeria, and even
          > though it's nearby, I suggest you find someone else." A man would say,
          > "I'm really an expert in Afghanistan but I'd love to come and comment."
          >
          > So, don't you think it's odd that Bahat is willing to comment on the
          > finds without having come to look at the site first? His only basis of
          > evidence as to whether the finds are or are not part of the Second Temple
          > courtyard is the behavior of the Antiquities Authority. His accusation
          > against the Antiquities Authority is really worse than Barkay's. Dr.
          > Barkay and the other archaeologists only suggest that the Antiquities
          > Authority is doing nothing as a tractor digs up ancient finds at a
          > declared
          > antiquities site. Dr. Bahat suggests that the Antiquities Authority is
          > doing nothing because the finds are not related to Jewish history (from his
          > point of view) and therefore, it's ok to use a tractor to dig them up and
          > destroy them! Look again at the pictures, especially at the next to the last
          > picture:
          > http://www.echad.info/bait/new_ditchE28-08-07.htm
          >
          > For what it's worth, Bahat's own book on the history of Jerusalem
          > describes a wall only during Biblical times and not afterwards,
          > in the location described in the map. As for the Antiquities Authority,
          > listing all the times the Antiquities Authority has stood by and done
          > nothing, perjured itself in the Israeli Supreme Court to the effect that
          > antiquities were not being destroyed (only to later claim that indeed
          > archaeological crimes have been committed, or after earlier having
          > claimed that it has little information on how antiquities are being
          > handled at the site) would be far too long for a mailing list post, or
          > even a newspaper article. The Authority's (as well as the Police and
          > the Prosecution's) behavior in this matter has been to release little
          > and sometimes misleading information in order to avoid a public
          > uproar over the crimes being committed. The Israeli Supreme Court's
          > position has generally been to avoid interference even in light of
          > flagrant violations of the law. Dan Bahat's statement above is no more
          > than continuing this policy.
          >
          > Yitzhak Sapir
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >


          --
          Dave Washburn
          Why do it right when you can do it again?
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