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Re: [ANE-2] Re: Re: Living in the desert

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  • Clark Whelton
    ... During World War II in North Africa, infantry soldiers carrying field packs marched at the official U.S. Army speed of two and a half miles (ca. four km.)
    Message 1 of 53 , Jun 3, 2007
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      >>>> If I recall correctly travel distances for large groups of fully
      > loaded infantry are about 25 km/day and can reach 100 km/day for
      > small groups of light load elite infantry...
      >>>Ariel.


      During World War II in North Africa, infantry soldiers carrying field packs
      marched at the official U.S. Army speed of two and a half miles (ca. four
      km.) per hour. In his memoirs, General L.K. Truscott wrote that he trained
      his men to march at four, and even five, miles per hour. But ambulances
      followed the line of march to pick up soldiers exhausted by the rapid pace.
      One New York City block in 45 seconds (four m.p.h.) is as fast as I can
      move, without an ambulance.

      Clark Whelton
      New York
    • finckean
      Listers may be interested in the folowing article from today s www.nytimes.com: Scholars Race to Recover a Lost Kingdom on the Nile By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
      Message 53 of 53 , Jun 19, 2007
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        Listers may be interested in the folowing article from today's
        www.nytimes.com:
        Scholars Race to Recover a Lost Kingdom on the Nile
        By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
        Published: June 19, 2007
        On the periphery of history in antiquity, there was a land known as
        Kush. Overshadowed by Egypt, to the north, it was a place of
        uncharted breadth and depth far up the Nile, a mystery verging on
        myth. One thing the Egyptians did know and recorded — Kush had gold.
        Skip to next paragraph
        Multimedia
        Slide Show
        A Lost Kingdom on the Nile

        Gist of the article is that scholars from U. Chicago are - and have
        been all year - working frantically to recover evidence about the
        lost kingdom of Kush (2000-1500 BC) that - despite having neither a
        writing system nor bureaucracy - flourished as a gold-producing
        megalith between the first and fourth catartacts and farther south.
        A new dam around the fourth cataract threatens to turn the area into
        a lake.
        Andrew Fincke
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