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SV: [ANE-2] Re: Re: Living in the desert

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  • Niels Peter Lemche
    To put things in relief, an English soldier during the desert war (WW II) needed 25 litres of water a day, or so I have heard. Believe it after my fourteen
    Message 1 of 53 , Jun 3, 2007
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      To put things in relief, an English soldier during the desert war (WW
      II) needed 25 litres of water a day, or so I have heard. Believe it
      after my fourteen litres in a day in Petra some years ago. Soldiers can
      also travel longer because they may carry their provision, including
      water, with them.

      But didn't this start as a discussion about whether or not Palmyra was
      on a main caravan route already in the MB age? I thing I never got an
      answer. And if we take nomadism before the introduction of the camel,
      water supplies should be enough to feed perhaps comprehensive flocks of
      animals, who also needed time to find food.

      It has been as if this discussion was aiming of refuting what most
      people working with nomadism have formerly agreed on.

      If I am not absolutely wrong, it is also interesting that Hebrew midbar
      "desert" may etymologically have to do with gazing land, steppe, and not
      desert in the Lawrence of Arabia fashion.

      By the way, Lawrence's tour via the Nefud (wadi Sirhan) to Aqaba is also
      indicating something.

      Niels Peter Lemche
    • finckean
      Listers may be interested in the folowing article from today s www.nytimes.com: Scholars Race to Recover a Lost Kingdom on the Nile By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
      Message 53 of 53 , Jun 19, 2007
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        Listers may be interested in the folowing article from today's
        www.nytimes.com:
        Scholars Race to Recover a Lost Kingdom on the Nile
        By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
        Published: June 19, 2007
        On the periphery of history in antiquity, there was a land known as
        Kush. Overshadowed by Egypt, to the north, it was a place of
        uncharted breadth and depth far up the Nile, a mystery verging on
        myth. One thing the Egyptians did know and recorded — Kush had gold.
        Skip to next paragraph
        Multimedia
        Slide Show
        A Lost Kingdom on the Nile

        Gist of the article is that scholars from U. Chicago are - and have
        been all year - working frantically to recover evidence about the
        lost kingdom of Kush (2000-1500 BC) that - despite having neither a
        writing system nor bureaucracy - flourished as a gold-producing
        megalith between the first and fourth catartacts and farther south.
        A new dam around the fourth cataract threatens to turn the area into
        a lake.
        Andrew Fincke
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