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Re: [ANE-2] Re: Re: Living in the desert

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  • E Bruce Brooks
    To: ANE-2 In Response To: Ariel On: Travel Across Deserts From: Bruce Ariel remarks that loads and days of travel for armies across hostile and sometime also
    Message 1 of 53 , Jun 3, 2007
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      To: ANE-2
      In Response To: Ariel
      On: Travel Across Deserts
      From: Bruce

      Ariel remarks that loads and days of travel for armies across hostile and
      sometime also desert terrain "should be documented all over the place." One
      place to look is Donald Engels, Alexander the Great and the Logistics of the
      Macedonian Army (California 1980). It gives seemingly careful calculations
      for calories per day, miles per day, pounds per pack, and so on. An
      eye-opener for the armchair generals who draw lines on the map, but never
      think to figure where the next day's grub for an army on the march is coming
      from, or how many pack animals will be needed to carry it, or how long it
      will take for that pack train to pass a given point. Or how long before
      overworked pack animals are no longer serviceable.

      One factor intermittently applicable to Alexander was the possibility of
      resupply by sea. It enormously simplified the logistics. That possibility
      would have been available for the "seashore route" taken by the expedition
      of Thutmos III, no?

      Bruce

      E Bruce Brooks
      Warring States Project
      University of Massachusetts at Amherst
    • finckean
      Listers may be interested in the folowing article from today s www.nytimes.com: Scholars Race to Recover a Lost Kingdom on the Nile By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
      Message 53 of 53 , Jun 19, 2007
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        Listers may be interested in the folowing article from today's
        www.nytimes.com:
        Scholars Race to Recover a Lost Kingdom on the Nile
        By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
        Published: June 19, 2007
        On the periphery of history in antiquity, there was a land known as
        Kush. Overshadowed by Egypt, to the north, it was a place of
        uncharted breadth and depth far up the Nile, a mystery verging on
        myth. One thing the Egyptians did know and recorded — Kush had gold.
        Skip to next paragraph
        Multimedia
        Slide Show
        A Lost Kingdom on the Nile

        Gist of the article is that scholars from U. Chicago are - and have
        been all year - working frantically to recover evidence about the
        lost kingdom of Kush (2000-1500 BC) that - despite having neither a
        writing system nor bureaucracy - flourished as a gold-producing
        megalith between the first and fourth catartacts and farther south.
        A new dam around the fourth cataract threatens to turn the area into
        a lake.
        Andrew Fincke
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