Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Relief from Carthage

Expand Messages
  • Bradley Skene
    A colleage of mine brought to my attention a Carthaginian relief, published in Victor von Hagaen, *The Roads that Led to* Rome. The original publication gives
    Message 1 of 4 , May 31, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      A colleage of mine brought to my attention a Carthaginian relief, published
      in Victor von Hagaen, *The Roads that Led to* Rome. The original publication
      gives very little information. It does not mention it in the text, but
      illustrates it with a photo and gives the caption:


      "A roughly carved Punic relief discovered in the ruins of Carthage. The city
      was finally destroyed after the Third Punic War, which ended in 146 BC."


      The heavily damaged relief in any case reflects the conventions and style of
      Hellenistic art, if somewhat crudely rendered. Without that caption, I would
      have assign it by style to Late Antiquity. My colleague thought it might be
      Mithraic, but it definitely is not, though it seems to share the same kind
      of artistic vocabulary as Mithraism, the Cult of the Danubian riders etc.

      The image (the plaque is probably rather less than a meter in both
      dimensions) is divided into three registers. The lowest shows a group of 4
      nude male anguipeds raising their arms over their heads as is to protect
      themselves--giants a la the altar of Pergamon, perhaps. The top register
      shows two priests in formal robes performing sacrifice at an altar--burning
      incense vel sim.

      The middle register is the interesting one. It shows an altar to which a
      priest is leading a bull. It is clearly still alive, but its head is resting
      on the altar. The altar is being supported by two legs, or perhaps we are
      seeing inside the altar. In any case, underneath the altar with see the
      upright torso and head of a mummy,as though it were rising out of or sinking
      into the ground. Behind this scene two men in Persian dress are leading
      horses to the left and right away from the center of the scene.

      The difficult thing is the mummy. It seems very plain that that is what it
      is, but I can think of no parallel for it in classical religious art outside
      of the Greek magical papyri (which are obviously not relevant here). Its
      wrapping are clearly indicated, though a rather skeletalized face is exposed
      (the faces of all the other figures in the relief have been broken off).

      My colleague assures me von Hagen gives no reference to earlier publication,
      though all I have seen is a xerox of the photograph (the plaque appears to
      have been set for the photo in front of some cactus like plants, and grass
      is visible in front of it). Does anyone know anything about this plaque? Or,
      if you are familiar with Rives, *Religion and Authority in Roman Carthage*,
      is it the kind of thing that might be mentioned there? My initial searches
      have not turned up much in the way of other recent publication on
      Carthaginian religion. have I missed something that might help me with this
      plaque?

      Thanks,

      Bradley A. Skene

      Cheers,

      Malkhos


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • goranson@duke.edu
      FWIW, though I haven t found a discussion of what von Hagen, The Roads that Led to Rome (1967) p. 87 (unpersuasively?) captioned as ... a review raised doubts
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 4, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        FWIW, though I haven't found a discussion of what von Hagen, The Roads
        that Led
        to Rome (1967) p. 87 (unpersuasively?) captioned as

        > "A roughly carved Punic relief discovered in the ruins of Carthage. The city
        > was finally destroyed after the Third Punic War, which ended in 146 BC."

        a review raised doubts about the reliability of the book. Can we be
        sure of the
        relief's provenance and date?

        The review title: "Inextricabilis Error." Classical Review 18 (1968)
        335-6, A.R.
        Burn (available at jstor).

        Stephen Goranson
        http://www.duke.edu/~goranson
      • Bradley Skene
        If you look back through the tread, it was already argued quite strongly that the relief is late Antique. But thanks for the reference ... [Non-text portions
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 4, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          If you look back through the tread, it was already argued quite strongly
          that the relief is late Antique. But thanks for the reference

          On 6/4/07, goranson@... <goranson@...> wrote:
          >
          > FWIW, though I haven't found a discussion of what von Hagen, The Roads
          > that Led
          > to Rome (1967) p. 87 (unpersuasively?) captioned as
          >
          > > "A roughly carved Punic relief discovered in the ruins of Carthage. The
          > city
          > > was finally destroyed after the Third Punic War, which ended in 146 BC."
          >
          > a review raised doubts about the reliability of the book. Can we be
          > sure of the
          > relief's provenance and date?
          >
          > The review title: "Inextricabilis Error." Classical Review 18 (1968)
          > 335-6, A.R.
          > Burn (available at jstor).
          >
          > Stephen Goranson
          > http://www.duke.edu/~goranson
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Sam WOLFF
          I am personally not familiar with this stela, but its execution, in registers and its contents-- altar, priests, bull offering, etc.-- remind me of another one
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 5, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            I am personally not familiar with this stela, but its execution, in registers and its contents-- altar, priests, bull offering, etc.-- remind me of another one from Siliana, Tunisia, called the Boglio Stela, dated to AD 175-200. It is to be found in the Bardo Museum, Tunisia. This stela is published in P. MacKendrick, The North African Stones Speak (1980), p. 72 and fig. 3.13 (I can't find the primary reference to this stela). This latter stela goes with what a previous writer stated, that it might be a Saturn stela, perhaps to be related to the discussion found in Rives' book.

            Hope this helps,

            Sam Wolff
            Jerusalem

            **********************************************************************************************
            IMPORTANT: The contents of this email and any attachments are confidential. They are intended for the
            named recipient(s) only.
            If you have received this email in error, please notify the system manager or the sender immediately and do
            not disclose the contents to anyone or make copies thereof.
            *** eSafe scanned this email for viruses, vandals, and malicious content. ***
            **********************************************************************************************
            ----------

            Was scanned by Bezeq Security Services


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.