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Re: [ANE-2] Living in the desert

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  • Ariel L. Szczupak
    ... As far as I remember only one area in the modern near east qualifies as having water sources further apart than one day s walk - the empty quarter in
    Message 1 of 53 , May 30, 2007
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      At 10:27 AM 5/30/2007, Niels Peter Lemche wrote:
      >Need water every day, or they die.

      As far as I remember only one area in the modern near east qualifies
      as having water sources further apart than one day's walk - the
      "empty quarter" in Saudi Arabia (can't recall the name in Arabic). In
      all the other deserts there are "pit stops" (be it a full blown oasis
      or a real pit - a well) that are separated by a day or less. Of
      course one has to know where they are, or else ... And is the modern
      situation relevant to the ANE? From memory again, the major climatic
      change which e.g. changed part of the Arabian peninsula from
      sub-tropical to arid was around 5000bc. There were fluctuations since
      but (memory again) recent times are considered on the dry end of the
      scale. No time to check the books for solid refs. But the leopard
      that was caught a few days ago in a Sde Boker house is anecdotal
      evidence that the desert can be surprising as to how much life it supports.


      Ariel.

      [100% bona fide dilettante ... delecto ergo sum!]

      ---
      Ariel L. Szczupak
      AMIS-JLM (Ricercar Ltd.)
      POB 4707, Jerusalem, Israel 91401
      Phone: +972-2-5619660 Fax: +972-2-5634203
      ane.als@...
    • finckean
      Listers may be interested in the folowing article from today s www.nytimes.com: Scholars Race to Recover a Lost Kingdom on the Nile By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
      Message 53 of 53 , Jun 19, 2007
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        Listers may be interested in the folowing article from today's
        www.nytimes.com:
        Scholars Race to Recover a Lost Kingdom on the Nile
        By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
        Published: June 19, 2007
        On the periphery of history in antiquity, there was a land known as
        Kush. Overshadowed by Egypt, to the north, it was a place of
        uncharted breadth and depth far up the Nile, a mystery verging on
        myth. One thing the Egyptians did know and recorded — Kush had gold.
        Skip to next paragraph
        Multimedia
        Slide Show
        A Lost Kingdom on the Nile

        Gist of the article is that scholars from U. Chicago are - and have
        been all year - working frantically to recover evidence about the
        lost kingdom of Kush (2000-1500 BC) that - despite having neither a
        writing system nor bureaucracy - flourished as a gold-producing
        megalith between the first and fourth catartacts and farther south.
        A new dam around the fourth cataract threatens to turn the area into
        a lake.
        Andrew Fincke
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