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Re: [ANE-2] Re: Are Etruscans Phoenicians?

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  • Gene Greenwood
    I m with you Chris. Linguistically, textually and geographically one would have to seriously consider the Phoenicians were fundamentally descendants of Ebla
    Message 1 of 33 , Apr 6 1:45 AM
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      I'm with you Chris. Linguistically, textually and geographically one would have to seriously consider the Phoenicians were fundamentally descendants of Ebla influenced through trade by early Aegean (Minoan?) culture.
      Gene . . . .
      Gene Greenwood


      ----- Original Message ----
      From: Chris Weimer <Christopher.M.Weimer@...>
      To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, April 6, 2007 12:20:02 AM
      Subject: [ANE-2] Re: Are Etruscans Phoenicians?

      I don't think so - Anatolia wasn't predominantly a Semitic
      (linguistically) homeland, and the Phonecians were defnitely a Semitic
      speaking people.

      Chris Weimer
    • Miguel Valerio
      Dear all, Forgive me if any of this has been brought up before as I haven t had the time to read every one of the 32 messages in this thread. I think the
      Message 33 of 33 , Apr 17 10:05 AM
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        Dear all,

        Forgive me if any of this has been brought up before as I haven't
        had the time to read every one of the 32 messages in this thread.

        I think the thesis that Etruscans originated in Asia Minor is well
        founded. There is evidence that there was a drought in Anatolia by
        the end of the 13th century BC (for instance, the Hittite king
        appealed to Egypt for wheat), that might have caused a series of
        migrations, known commonly as the "Sea Peoples" phenomenon. This
        same event could have triggered a migration of populations from
        Western Anatolia to Italy. "The origin of Etruscans" by R.S.P.
        Beekes (http://www.knaw.nl/publicaties/pdf/20021051.pdf) synthesizes
        the evidence that supports this scenario.

        The Stele of Lemnos is another important pillar of this thesis, as
        its language � dubbed Lemnian � shows traits that connect it to the
        little we know of Etruscan. These traits include case endings and
        numerals. I have had the opportunity to examine the stele myself and
        I find its content quite interesting. For this, see a summary of
        Etruscan external history together with an outline of the grammar of
        the language, written by Michael Weiss (Cornell University) and
        available online (http://ling.cornell.edu/people/Weiss/CGL_35-Etruscan.pdf). It is certainly fruitful to compare the Lemnian text
        against Etruscan but, given the reference, I will abstain from
        asserting further on the linguistic evidence. In addition, I think
        one can relate the Etruscan alphabet to those of Asia Minor (such as
        the Lycian), as well as to that of the Lemnos stele with some
        certainty.
        To sum up, I think it is not farfetched to suggest that a non-IE
        language family was spoken by some populations in the Aegean and
        Western Anatolia and that one group speaking such a language
        migrated westwards becoming known as Etruscans. Lemnians would then
        be a population that remained.

        Whether this language group and these populations can be related or
        not to Eteo-Cretans, Minoans or whatever else is a whole different
        question which, in my view, must be approached with caution at this
        moment.

        Best regards,

        Miguel F. G. Val�rio
        Undergraduate student of Archaeology

        Faculdade de Ci�ncias Sociais e Humanas
        Universidade Nova de Lisboa
        Dept. Hist�ria
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