Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Japhia and Nazareth

Expand Messages
  • Dierk van den Berg
    ... Chorazin which is condemned by Jesus in Mt 11.21-22. Josephus makes no mention of the town. While remains have been excavated, nothing points to a date
    Message 1 of 43 , Apr 3, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, George F Somsel <gfsomsel@...> wrote:
      >
      > I suppose you would apply the same logic (??) to the case of
      Chorazin which is condemned by Jesus in Mt 11.21-22. Josephus makes
      no mention of the town. While remains have been excavated, nothing
      points to a date prior to the 1st c. AD.
      <[snip]
      > What is the reason for the invention of this town in Matthew? Even
      more puzzling, why would Jewish refugees from the 2nd revolt name a
      town Nazareth in keeping with Christian tradition?
      >
      >
      > george
      > gfsomsel
      > _________
      >

      Mt 11.21f. is connected with Mr 8.22ff. - the perikope
      (presumably from the late 60s of the 1st c. CE) is exclusively to be
      understood in a contemporary political sense.
      On the other hand, Mt 2.23 points to a much older 'idea of God' -
      simply translate 'Nazaret' and you will see, for

      »having eyes, see ye not? and having ears, hear ye not? and do ye not
      remember?« [Mr 8.18]

      And the remembrance of this 'idea of God' had still influenced the
      momentum of the Bar Kochba uprising.


      tot ziens,
      Dierk van den Berg
      RU Nijmegen, NL
      -------------------------------------------
      kullu nafsin dsa 'iqatu l-mawt (surah 3.185)
      *all living is pervaded by the taste of death*
      [Momentum of Shiite al-Mahdi Messianism]
    • JEFFREY A BLAKELY
      Beatrice, There are a number of ethnographical studies of pottery that were published in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, primarily in AA. I think some of these
      Message 43 of 43 , Apr 10, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Beatrice,

        There are a number of ethnographical studies of pottery that were published in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, primarily in AA. I think some of these appear in Kramer's "Ceramic Ethnoarchaeology" in Annual Review of Anthropology 1985. Mostly this was American, but the idea is that because of frequent use and because of frequent thermal shock that cooking vessels have a life-span in the range of months not years. Amphorae are at the other end of the scale in years if not decades. Oh yes, see Longacre's article in Decoding Prehistoric Ceramics and references there.

        I hope this helps.
        Jeff
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.