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Re: [ANE-2] Re: Japhia and Nazareth

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  • Yitzhak Sapir
    ... Zippora Cochavi-Rainey apparently identifies Yapu of the Amarna letters with Jaffa. (That is, in the geographical index of her Amarna letters translation,
    Message 1 of 43 , Mar 31, 2007
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      On 3/31/07, Rene wrote:

      > Japhia "appears in the Amarna letters as `the town of Yapu' (ANET
      > 485). It was one of several cities that supplied corveƩ labor for
      > Egypt." (ABD, "Japhia"). This is the concensus position, that
      > "Yapu"=Japhia. I see no reason to doubt it, in which case we have
      > Bronze Age (XIV BCE) attestation for Japhia also.

      Zippora Cochavi-Rainey apparently identifies Yapu of the Amarna letters
      with Jaffa. (That is, in the geographical index of her Amarna letters
      translation, there is a listing for Jaffa, and it says right after Yapu, and
      gives the relevant Amarna letters where this toponym appears). It is
      apparently mentioned by one letter by the ruler of Megiddo, one by the
      ruler of Byblos, one by the ruler of Lachish, and one from an unnamed
      location (EA 296), but it mentions Yapu alongside Gaza. It appears to
      me that the equation Yapu = Yafo, makes more sense, and the northern
      letters mentioning it can also be explained. If I remember correctly, Jaffa
      was an Egyptian administrative center for the entire Canaan region.
      Maybe I am not reading Cochavi-Rainey properly, but still the mention of
      Yapu alongside Gaza suggests a southern location for me.

      Yitzhak Sapir
    • JEFFREY A BLAKELY
      Beatrice, There are a number of ethnographical studies of pottery that were published in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, primarily in AA. I think some of these
      Message 43 of 43 , Apr 10, 2007
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        Beatrice,

        There are a number of ethnographical studies of pottery that were published in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, primarily in AA. I think some of these appear in Kramer's "Ceramic Ethnoarchaeology" in Annual Review of Anthropology 1985. Mostly this was American, but the idea is that because of frequent use and because of frequent thermal shock that cooking vessels have a life-span in the range of months not years. Amphorae are at the other end of the scale in years if not decades. Oh yes, see Longacre's article in Decoding Prehistoric Ceramics and references there.

        I hope this helps.
        Jeff
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