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Re: Talpiot, Forgive them Father, for they haven't the slighest idea what they are doing'

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  • jamesdtabor
    It is very helpful to have this information regarding the registration and tagging of the ossuaries from this or any tomb, when it was done and by whom. In
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 30 9:11 AM
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      It is very helpful to have this information regarding the registration and "tagging" of the
      ossuaries from this or any tomb, when it was done and by whom. In my posting I have
      "asked" about this and I am glad for this response. I take it then that the series of 80.500ff
      numbers were assigned as the material was received and thus have nothing to do with
      whether an ossuary is inscribed or not, or what any particular inscription says, since Gath
      indicates, several months after the "registration" that so far "four" had been noticed and
      not yet deciphered, which means at least two of those inscribed were already registrered
      with these numbers but without the inscriptions yet noticed or noted.

      If we could now find out two other things it would be most helpful. First, how the
      numbering of the ossuaries in each kok (see Gibson's map and he says he was very precise
      with what Gath told him) might correspond to the registraton numbers/field IDs we would
      be able to know how the names of these six were grouped in the tomb. Second, if any kind
      of anthropological report was done on the bones in the tomb that would also be of great
      help in terms of discussions of 100s (one quote early on to the press) of people in this
      small tomb, vs. maybe 15-20.

      James Tabor

      --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, Joe Zias <joezias@...> wrote:
      >
      Anyone with a modicum of experience in excavating will know that objects in the field are
      not cataloged, this is the task of the curator who curates these objects. In fact, in the field,
      particularly in burial caves with no light but hand held flashlights and lanterns,
      inscriptions are of little concern. The objects are simply tagged with the registration
      number. The final numbers beginning with 80.500 were only added in the museum, after
      cleaning. This is the standard operating practice anywhere in the world, objects are at
      most given a registration number in the field and recorded in the excavators field diary.
      The fact that there were 10 ossuaries given final numbers, means one thing and one thing
      only, that 10 ossuaries had to have reached the Rockefeller Museum and that the curator
      (myself) numbered these objects.
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