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New Articles and Reviews in JHS

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  • Ehud Ben Zvi
    Dear all, I am glad to announce the recent publication of two articles and a review in the Journal of Hebrew Scriptures. As usual, please go to
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 11, 2007
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      Dear all,

      I am glad to announce the recent publication of two articles and a review in the Journal of Hebrew Scriptures. As usual, please go to http://www.jhsonline.org to access the Journal.

      Articles:

      Journal of Hebrew Scriptures - Volume 7: Article 4 (2007)

      Scott B. Noegel, “‘Word Play’ in Qoheleth”

      Abstract

      This study offers a comprehensive treatment of the subject of “word play” in the book of Qoheleth. After discussing the problematic nature of the term “word play,” and explaining my preference for the word “punning,” I examine six different types of punning found in Qoheleth. The first, focuses on alliteration, or the repeated use of consonants. The second section collects examples of assonance, or the repeated use of vowel patterns. The third section focuses on illustrations of polysemy; cases in which words bear more than one meaning in a single context. The fourth section, which is related to polysemy, details cases of antanaclasis. Antanaclasis occurs when a word is used multiple times, but with different meanings. In the fifth section, I provide examples of allusive punning, i.e., the use of words or forms that imply by way of similarity of sound another word that does not occur in the text. The sixth section is devoted to instances of numerical punning. After providing the data for each of these devices, I offer some general observations on punning in Qoheleth.

      Those who wish to access this article directly may go to

      http://www.arts.ualberta.ca/JHS/abstracts-articles.html#A65


      Journal of Hebrew Scriptures - Volume 7: Article 3 (2007)

      Lisbeth S. Fried, Did Second Temple High Priests Possess the Urim and Thummim?

      Abstract

      According to TB Yoma 21b, the urim and the thummim and the spirit of prophecy were among the things missing from the Second Temple. According to Ezra 2:61-63 (Neh.7:63-65), they were missing from the time of the return. Josephus suggests, however, that the urim and thummim stopped shining, that is they ceased to function, only around 104 BCE, about the time of John Hyrcanus’ death. According to Josephus, then, second temple high priests consulted urim and thummim. To decide between these two claims, we examine second temple texts dated to the period before Hyrcanus’ death. These texts confirm Josephus and suggest that the contemporary high priest may have used urim and thummim as an oracular device.

      Those who wish to access this article directly may go to

      http://www.arts.ualberta.ca/JHS/abstracts-articles.html#A64


      Reviews:

      Campbell, Antony F. , and Mark A. O’Brien, Rethinking the Pentateuch: Prolegomena to the Theology of Ancient Israel (Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press, 2005). (Reviewed by Lissa M. Wray Beal)

      Douglas, Mary, Jacob’s Tears: The Priestly Work of Reconciliation (Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press, 2005). (Reviewed by Bernon Lee)

      Scurlock, JoAnn, Magico-Medical Means of Treating Ghost-Induced Illnesses in Ancient Mesopotamia (Ancient Magic and Divination, III; Leiden: Brill/Styx, 2006). (Reviewed by Scott Noegel)

      Scurlock, JoAnn, and Burton Andersen, Diagnoses in Assyrian and Babylonian Medicine: Ancient Sources, Translations, and Modern Medical Analyses (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2005). (Reviewed by Scott Noegel)

      Those who wish to access the review section directly may go to

      http://www.arts.ualberta.ca/JHS/reviews/reviews_vol.html

      For information about the most recent printed version of the journal (vols 1-4) go to
      http://www.gorgiaspress.com/bookshop/c-78-gorgias-perspectives-on-hebrew-scriptures.aspx

      Volume 5 is being prepared for publication and Volume 6 will follow soon.

      Regards,

      Ehud


      Ehud Ben Zvi
      History and Classics
      University of Alberta
      2-28 HM Tory Building
      Edmonton AB Canada T6G 2H4


      ** This communication is intended for the use of the recipient to whom it is addressed, and may contain confidential, personal, and/or privileged information. Please contact me immediately if you are not the intended recipient of this communication, and do not copy, distribute, or take action relying on it. Any communication received in error, or subsequent reply, should be deleted or destroyed.**



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Andrew Fincke
      Thanks, Liz, for the article on Urim/Tumim. Seems what upsets you is matseba at Hosea 3:4. And you don t quite buy the LXX solution, mizbeach . (article,
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 12, 2007
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        Thanks, Liz, for the article on Urim/Tumim.
        Seems what upsets you is "matseba" at Hosea 3:4. And you don't quite buy the LXX solution, "mizbeach". (article, page 5) What you want is "mishpat", because that's what goes with the vestments at Exod. 28:30 and Ben Sira 46. (article page 9) So now we have to figure out when wasn't there a king (so Hos 3:4) and when wasn't there judgment (idem with correction) and when wasn't there ephod (idem). Answer: during the time when David fled from Absalom. 1) Absalom didn't request advice via ephod (cf. David 1 Sam 23:6 and 30:7) but rather directly from David's "advisor", Achitopel, and "friend", Chushi - see 2 Sam 16:20, 17:1, 17:5. 2) There wasn't judgment, because Absalom "justified" every one who had "judgment to come to the king" (2 Sam 15:4). Absalom removed everyone who had "judgment", since he didn't want to be reminded of his deficiencies. See 11QT 58,15-20 cited by you at page 22. There the "judgment" of the Urim and Tumim is contrasted to "counsel".
        Absalom chose the path of "counsel". But there's another solution for "matseba" at Hos 3:4, and you bring it at page 23: "Mizpah", which differs from "matseva" by just one letter. At Mizpa the Israelites "drew" water, and "poured" it out; and there Samuel "judged" Israel. wayishavu, vayishpeku, wayishpot (1 Samuel 7:6). Just as "shavu" turns to "shpot", so "matseva" turns to "mishpat". So when were the Urim and Tumim installed during the second temple? At the time when the house of Absalom figured in Jewish politics. See the stories about his sons Matthias and Jonathan at 1 Macc 11:70 and 13:11.
        Andrew Fincke

        [SNIP]

        Lisbeth S. Fried, Did Second Temple High Priests Possess the Urim and Thummim?

        Abstract

        According to TB Yoma 21b, the urim and the thummim and the spirit of prophecy were among the things missing from the Second Temple. According to Ezra 2:61-63 (Neh.7:63-65), they were missing from the time of the return. Josephus suggests, however, that the urim and thummim stopped shining, that is they ceased to function, only around 104 BCE, about the time of John Hyrcanus� death. According to Josephus, then, second temple high priests consulted urim and thummim. To decide between these two claims, we examine second temple texts dated to the period before Hyrcanus� death. These texts confirm Josephus and suggest that the contemporary high priest may have used urim and thummim as an oracular device.

        Those who wish to access this article directly may go to

        http://www.arts.ualberta.ca/JHS/abstracts-articles.html#A64


        [SNIP]
      • Yitzhak Sapir
        Dear Liz, I do not feel the verse in Ezra necessarily means that there was no Urim and Tummim. Rather, it could also mean that they had to abstain from eating
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 12, 2007
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          Dear Liz,

          I do not feel the verse in Ezra necessarily means that there was no Urim and
          Tummim. Rather, it could also mean that they had to abstain from eating
          the holy food until a scheduled ceremony whereby a priest inquires of the
          Urim and Tummim. Yonina Dor in her book, "Have the 'Foreign Women'
          Really Been Expelled?", p. 200 suggests that indeed the family of Haqqoz
          was reinstated as can be interpreted from Ezra 8:33 and its participation in
          the building of the wall in Nehemiah 3:4, 21. She suggests the dissonance
          between Ezra 2:61-63/Nehemiah 7:63-65 and these later verses that
          the verse defining separation from community is part of a ceremony where
          the family is set apart for a specific time in order to purify it and which may
          suggest the initial stages of a conversion process. This purification
          ceremony reenforces the law that foreign women are "bad" while at the
          same time providing legitimacy for them. Yonina Dor suggests that the
          "holy object" during the ceremony is the Book of the Law which replaced
          earlier traditional objects such as "the rock, the matsebah, the altar, the
          Urim and Tummim, the Ephod, the Ark, the Tent of Meeting, etc." (p. 176-
          177). She obviously feels that the Urim and Tummim were no longer in
          use following the religious reformation that began in Josiah's reformation
          and continued through the Exile. But it may just as well be that if the Urim
          and Tummim remained, they also played a role as the "holy object" in the
          ceremony. She makes reference to Victor Turner (ed), "Celebration: Studies
          in Festivity and Ritual", p. 21 and David Kertzer, "Ritual, Politics,
          and Power",
          p. 10 as examples of anthropological studies that highlight the role of holy
          objects such as statues and icons and which symbolize the principles of
          faith in any ritual of human society irrespective of time and place. Ezra 2:61-
          63 / Nehemiah 7:63-65 could be an explicit affirmation of such a role for the
          Urim and Tummim.

          Yitzhak Sapir
        • Christophe Batsch
          Dear fellows if you can read French you ll find a comprehensive data file about your question in my chapter Ourîm et Toummîm in La Guerre et les rites de
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 13, 2007
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            Dear fellows
            if you can read French you'll find a comprehensive data file about your
            question in my chapter "Ourîm et Toummîm" in "La Guerre et les rites de
            guerre dans le judaisme du deuxième Temple", Leiden, Brill, 2005, p.
            308-343.
            And do not forgot either the arch-classic C. Van Dam's "The Urim and
            Thummim. A Means of Revelation in Ancient Israel", Winona Lake: Einsenbaum,
            1997 -- whose conclusions I don't share, btw...
            Cordialement

            Christophe Batsch, Paris





            ----Original Message Follows----
            From: "Yitzhak Sapir" <yitzhaksapir@...>
            Reply-To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
            To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Urim and Thummim
            Date: Tue, 13 Mar 2007 00:59:52 +0000

            Dear Liz,

            I do not feel the verse in Ezra necessarily means that there was no Urim and
            Tummim. Rather, it could also mean that they had to abstain from eating
            the holy food until a scheduled ceremony whereby a priest inquires of the
            Urim and Tummim. Yonina Dor in her book, "Have the 'Foreign Women'
            Really Been Expelled?", p. 200 suggests that indeed the family of Haqqoz
            was reinstated as can be interpreted from Ezra 8:33 and its participation in
            the building of the wall in Nehemiah 3:4, 21. She suggests the dissonance
            between Ezra 2:61-63/Nehemiah 7:63-65 and these later verses that
            the verse defining separation from community is part of a ceremony where
            the family is set apart for a specific time in order to purify it and which
            may
            suggest the initial stages of a conversion process. This purification
            ceremony reenforces the law that foreign women are "bad" while at the
            same time providing legitimacy for them. Yonina Dor suggests that the
            "holy object" during the ceremony is the Book of the Law which replaced
            earlier traditional objects such as "the rock, the matsebah, the altar, the
            Urim and Tummim, the Ephod, the Ark, the Tent of Meeting, etc." (p. 176-
            177). She obviously feels that the Urim and Tummim were no longer in
            use following the religious reformation that began in Josiah's reformation
            and continued through the Exile. But it may just as well be that if the
            Urim
            and Tummim remained, they also played a role as the "holy object" in the
            ceremony. She makes reference to Victor Turner (ed), "Celebration: Studies
            in Festivity and Ritual", p. 21 and David Kertzer, "Ritual, Politics,
            and Power",
            p. 10 as examples of anthropological studies that highlight the role of holy
            objects such as statues and icons and which symbolize the principles of
            faith in any ritual of human society irrespective of time and place. Ezra
            2:61-
            63 / Nehemiah 7:63-65 could be an explicit affirmation of such a role for
            the
            Urim and Tummim.

            Yitzhak Sapir

            _________________________________________________________________
            Gagnez des écrans plats avec Live.com http://www.image-addict.fr/
          • Lisbeth S. Fried
            Very interesting suggestion! Liz Fried _____ From: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Andrew Fincke Sent: Monday, March 12, 2007
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 14, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              Very interesting suggestion!

              Liz Fried



              _____

              From: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
              Andrew Fincke
              Sent: Monday, March 12, 2007 2:11 PM
              To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [ANE-2] Urim and Thummim



              Thanks, Liz, for the article on Urim/Tumim.
              Seems what upsets you is "matseba" at Hosea 3:4. And you don't quite buy the
              LXX solution, "mizbeach". (article, page 5) What you want is "mishpat",
              because that's what goes with the vestments at Exod. 28:30 and Ben Sira 46.
              (article page 9) So now we have to figure out when wasn't there a king (so
              Hos 3:4) and when wasn't there judgment (idem with correction) and when
              wasn't there ephod (idem). Answer: during the time when David fled from
              Absalom. 1) Absalom didn't request advice via ephod (cf. David 1 Sam 23:6
              and 30:7) but rather directly from David's "advisor", Achitopel, and
              "friend", Chushi - see 2 Sam 16:20, 17:1, 17:5. 2) There wasn't judgment,
              because Absalom "justified" every one who had "judgment to come to the king"
              (2 Sam 15:4). Absalom removed everyone who had "judgment", since he didn't
              want to be reminded of his deficiencies. See 11QT 58,15-20 cited by you at
              page 22. There the "judgment" of the Urim and Tumim is contrasted to
              "counsel".
              Absalom chose the path of "counsel". But there's another solution for
              "matseba" at Hos 3:4, and you bring it at page 23: "Mizpah", which differs
              from "matseva" by just one letter. At Mizpa the Israelites "drew" water, and
              "poured" it out; and there Samuel "judged" Israel. wayishavu, vayishpeku,
              wayishpot (1 Samuel 7:6). Just as "shavu" turns to "shpot", so "matseva"
              turns to "mishpat". So when were the Urim and Tumim installed during the
              second temple? At the time when the house of Absalom figured in Jewish
              politics. See the stories about his sons Matthias and Jonathan at 1 Macc
              11:70 and 13:11.
              Andrew Fincke

              [SNIP]

              Lisbeth S. Fried, Did Second Temple High Priests Possess the Urim and
              Thummim?

              Abstract

              According to TB Yoma 21b, the urim and the thummim and the spirit of
              prophecy were among the things missing from the Second Temple. According to
              Ezra 2:61-63 (Neh.7:63-65), they were missing from the time of the return.
              Josephus suggests, however, that the urim and thummim stopped shining, that
              is they ceased to function, only around 104 BCE, about the time of John
              Hyrcanus� death. According to Josephus, then, second temple high priests
              consulted urim and thummim. To decide between these two claims, we examine
              second temple texts dated to the period before Hyrcanus� death. These
              texts confirm Josephus and suggest that the contemporary high priest may
              have used urim and thummim as an oracular device.

              Those who wish to access this article directly may go to

              http://www.arts
              <http://www.arts.ualberta.ca/JHS/abstracts-articles.html#A64>
              ualberta.ca/JHS/abstracts-articles.html#A64

              [SNIP]





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Lisbeth S. Fried
              I will try to read her book, thanks for the suggestion. Liz Fried _____ From: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Yitzhak Sapir
              Message 6 of 9 , Mar 14, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                I will try to read her book, thanks for the suggestion.

                Liz Fried



                _____

                From: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                Yitzhak Sapir
                Sent: Monday, March 12, 2007 9:00 PM
                To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Urim and Thummim



                Dear Liz,

                I do not feel the verse in Ezra necessarily means that there was no Urim and
                Tummim. Rather, it could also mean that they had to abstain from eating
                the holy food until a scheduled ceremony whereby a priest inquires of the
                Urim and Tummim. Yonina Dor in her book, "Have the 'Foreign Women'
                Really Been Expelled?", p. 200 suggests that indeed the family of Haqqoz
                was reinstated as can be interpreted from Ezra 8:33 and its participation in
                the building of the wall in Nehemiah 3:4, 21. She suggests the dissonance
                between Ezra 2:61-63/Nehemiah 7:63-65 and these later verses that
                the verse defining separation from community is part of a ceremony where
                the family is set apart for a specific time in order to purify it and which
                may
                suggest the initial stages of a conversion process. This purification
                ceremony reenforces the law that foreign women are "bad" while at the
                same time providing legitimacy for them. Yonina Dor suggests that the
                "holy object" during the ceremony is the Book of the Law which replaced
                earlier traditional objects such as "the rock, the matsebah, the altar, the
                Urim and Tummim, the Ephod, the Ark, the Tent of Meeting, etc." (p. 176-
                177). She obviously feels that the Urim and Tummim were no longer in
                use following the religious reformation that began in Josiah's reformation
                and continued through the Exile. But it may just as well be that if the Urim
                and Tummim remained, they also played a role as the "holy object" in the
                ceremony. She makes reference to Victor Turner (ed), "Celebration: Studies
                in Festivity and Ritual", p. 21 and David Kertzer, "Ritual, Politics,
                and Power",
                p. 10 as examples of anthropological studies that highlight the role of holy
                objects such as statues and icons and which symbolize the principles of
                faith in any ritual of human society irrespective of time and place. Ezra
                2:61-
                63 / Nehemiah 7:63-65 could be an explicit affirmation of such a role for
                the
                Urim and Tummim.

                Yitzhak Sapir





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Lisbeth S. Fried
                Dear Christoph, As you know, I have found both works very helpful. Liz Fried _____ From: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                Message 7 of 9 , Mar 14, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  Dear Christoph,

                  As you know, I have found both works very helpful.

                  Liz Fried



                  _____

                  From: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                  Christophe Batsch
                  Sent: Tuesday, March 13, 2007 4:15 AM
                  To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Urim and Thummim




                  Dear fellows
                  if you can read French you'll find a comprehensive data file about your
                  question in my chapter "Ourîm et Toummîm" in "La Guerre et les rites de
                  guerre dans le judaisme du deuxième Temple", Leiden, Brill, 2005, p.
                  308-343.
                  And do not forgot either the arch-classic C. Van Dam's "The Urim and
                  Thummim. A Means of Revelation in Ancient Israel", Winona Lake: Einsenbaum,
                  1997 -- whose conclusions I don't share, btw...
                  Cordialement

                  Christophe Batsch, Paris

                  ----Original Message Follows----
                  From: "Yitzhak Sapir" <yitzhaksapir@ <mailto:yitzhaksapir%40gmail.com>
                  gmail.com>
                  Reply-To: ANE-2@yahoogroups. <mailto:ANE-2%40yahoogroups.com> com
                  To: ANE-2@yahoogroups. <mailto:ANE-2%40yahoogroups.com> com
                  Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Urim and Thummim
                  Date: Tue, 13 Mar 2007 00:59:52 +0000

                  Dear Liz,

                  I do not feel the verse in Ezra necessarily means that there was no Urim and
                  Tummim. Rather, it could also mean that they had to abstain from eating
                  the holy food until a scheduled ceremony whereby a priest inquires of the
                  Urim and Tummim. Yonina Dor in her book, "Have the 'Foreign Women'
                  Really Been Expelled?", p. 200 suggests that indeed the family of Haqqoz
                  was reinstated as can be interpreted from Ezra 8:33 and its participation in
                  the building of the wall in Nehemiah 3:4, 21. She suggests the dissonance
                  between Ezra 2:61-63/Nehemiah 7:63-65 and these later verses that
                  the verse defining separation from community is part of a ceremony where
                  the family is set apart for a specific time in order to purify it and which
                  may
                  suggest the initial stages of a conversion process. This purification
                  ceremony reenforces the law that foreign women are "bad" while at the
                  same time providing legitimacy for them. Yonina Dor suggests that the
                  "holy object" during the ceremony is the Book of the Law which replaced
                  earlier traditional objects such as "the rock, the matsebah, the altar, the
                  Urim and Tummim, the Ephod, the Ark, the Tent of Meeting, etc." (p. 176-
                  177). She obviously feels that the Urim and Tummim were no longer in
                  use following the religious reformation that began in Josiah's reformation
                  and continued through the Exile. But it may just as well be that if the
                  Urim
                  and Tummim remained, they also played a role as the "holy object" in the
                  ceremony. She makes reference to Victor Turner (ed), "Celebration: Studies
                  in Festivity and Ritual", p. 21 and David Kertzer, "Ritual, Politics,
                  and Power",
                  p. 10 as examples of anthropological studies that highlight the role of holy
                  objects such as statues and icons and which symbolize the principles of
                  faith in any ritual of human society irrespective of time and place. Ezra
                  2:61-
                  63 / Nehemiah 7:63-65 could be an explicit affirmation of such a role for
                  the
                  Urim and Tummim.

                  Yitzhak Sapir

                  __________________________________________________________
                  Gagnez des écrans plats avec Live.com http://www.image-
                  <http://www.image-addict.fr/> addict.fr/





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • christophe.nihan@unil.ch
                  Dear All, I am glad to announce the publication of two new articles in the Journal of Hebrew Scriptures (http://www.jhsonline.org). Kåre BERGE, “Literacy,
                  Message 8 of 9 , Mar 15, 2012
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                    Dear All,


                    I am glad to announce the publication of two new articles in
                    the Journal of Hebrew Scriptures (http://www.jhsonline.org).


                    Kåre BERGE, “Literacy, Utopia and Memory: Is There a
                    Public Teaching in Deuteronomy?”

                    Abstract: The “teaching program” in Deuteronomy
                    presupposes a degree of general literacy that goes beyond
                    what was possible at the time of its production. This
                    article investigates the possibility of seeing this program
                    as a utopia meant for the reading elite rather than for the
                    public. This is a desire in which “historically situated
                    actors seek to reimagine their present and transform it into
                    a plausible future”. It is a vision of a reading community
                    based on the explication of the Book of the Torah of Moses.

                    To access the article directly please go to:

                    http://www.arts.ualberta.ca/JHS/Articles/article_165.pdf


                    Oded LIPSCHITS, “Archaeological Facts, Historical
                    Speculations and the Date of the LMLK Storage Jars: A
                    Rejoinder to David Ussishkin”

                    Abstract: Two substantially different approaches concerning
                    the phenomenon of the Judahite stamped jars, as well as
                    about underlying methodologies for their study, have been
                    advanced in recent research. This article documents the
                    points of dispute and discusses their implications for
                    critical assessments of the connections between
                    archaeological facts and their interpretation along with
                    their general significance regarding our understanding of
                    the history of Judah in the late 8th and 7th centuries BCE.

                    To access the article directly please go to:

                    http://www.arts.ualberta.ca/JHS/Articles/article_166.pdf


                    Also, I am glad to announce the following reviews in the
                    Journal of Hebrew Scriptures:

                    1. Dozeman, Thomas B., Exodus (ECC; Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
                    2009). (Reviewed by William Morrow).
                    2. Gärtner-Brereton, Luke, The Ontology of Space in
                    Biblical Hebrew Narrative: The Determinate Function of
                    Narrative “Space” within the Biblical Hebrew Aesthetic
                    (BibleWorld; Oakville, CT; Equinox, 2008). (Reviewed by
                    Robert C. Kashow).
                    3. Hackett, Jo Ann, A Basic Introduction to Biblical Hebrew
                    (Peabody, Mass.: Hendrickson, 2010). (Reviewed by Jason
                    Jackson).
                    4. Hagedorn, Anselm C. and Andrew Mein, eds., Aspects of
                    Amos: Exegesis and Interpretation (LHBOTS, 536; New
                    York/London: T&T Clark, 2011). (Reviewed by M. Daniel
                    Carroll R.).
                    5. Zahn, Molly M., Rethinking Rewritten Scripture:
                    Composition and Exegesis in the 4QReworked Pentateuch
                    Manuscripts (STDJ, 95; Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2011).
                    (Reviewed by William A. Tooman).


                    To access all published reviews directly please go to

                    http://www.arts.ualberta.ca/JHS/reviews_vol.html


                    Also, I am glad to announce that JHS is now offering
                    hypertext/ hyperlinked versions of all articles and reviews
                    published from 1996 to 2009 (inclusive of 2009). We are
                    currently working to include versions of the 2010/2011
                    articles and reviews.

                    Regards,

                    Christophe Nihan
                    University of Lausanne (Switzerland)
                    Associate General Editor, Journal of Hebrew Scriptures


                    ___________________________________________________________________

                    The printed version of volume 9 (2009) has been published.
                    For information please go to
                    http://www.gorgiaspress.com/bookshop/showproduct.aspx?ISBN=978-1-61143-004-2.
                    The printed version of volume 10 (2010) is currently in
                    print.

                    For information about the printed version of volume 8 (2008)
                    please go to
                    http://www.gorgiaspress.com/BOOKSHOP/pc-56678-10-ben-zvi-ehud-perspectives-on-hebrew-scriptures-v.aspx

                    For information about the other printed volumes of the
                    journal, please go to:
                    http://www.gorgiaspress.com/BOOKSHOP/pc-56678-10-ben-zvi-ehud-perspectives-on-hebrew-scriptures-v.aspx

                    The Logos version of vol. 8 has been released. For
                    information please go to
                    http://www.logos.com/product/8765/journal-of-hebrew-scriptures-vol-8.
                    For information about the Logos version of vols. 1-7, please
                    go to http://www.logos.com/products/details/4336.

                    The Logos version of volume 9 of the journal is being
                    prepared.
                  • christophe.nihan@unil.ch
                    Dear All, I am glad to announce the publication of two new articles in the Journal of Hebrew Scriptures (http://www.jhsonline.org/index.html). Matthijs J. DE
                    Message 9 of 9 , Oct 15, 2012
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                      Dear All,


                      I am glad to announce the publication of two new articles in
                      the Journal of Hebrew Scriptures
                      (http://www.jhsonline.org/index.html).

                      Matthijs J. DE JONG, "The Fallacy of 'True and False' in
                      Prophecy Illustrated by Jer 28:8–9."

                      Abstract: The understanding of biblical prophetic literature
                      has been hindered by a presumed dichotomy between prophecy
                      of salvation and prophecy of judgement. This can be
                      illustrated by Jer 28:8-9. That text has always been
                      interpreted on the basis of this dichotomy, but the result
                      is a forced reading. This article proposes an alternative
                      reading that suits better the text, the inner logic of ch.
                      28, and the traditions contained in chs. 27-29. The article
                      further argues that the mentioned dichotomy has no base in
                      historical prophecy.

                      To access the article directly please go to

                      http://www.jhsonline.org/JHS/Articles/article_172.pdf


                      Benjamin D. COX and Susan ACKERMAN, "Micah’s Teraphim."

                      Abstract: In publications in the 1990’s, K. van der Toorn
                      and T.J. Lewis revived and argued persuasively for a
                      reconstruction identifying the biblical teraphim as
                      representations of a family’s deceased ancestors. In this
                      paper, we look at the story of Micah’s teraphim in Judges
                      17-18 to suggest that this identification of the teraphim as
                      ancestor figurines is well supported by and, indeed,
                      clarifies certain details of the Micah account. Our
                      interpretation also illuminates other teraphim accounts, for
                      example, Rachel’s theft of her father Laban’s teraphim
                      in Gen 31:19-35.

                      To access the article directly please go to

                      http://www.jhsonline.org/JHS/Articles/article_173.pdf


                      Also, I am glad to announce the publication of several new
                      reviews in JHS:

                      1. Coomber, Matthew J. M. (ed.), Bible and Justice: Ancient
                      Texts, Modern Challenges (London: Equinox, 2011). (Reviewed
                      by Shannon E. Baines).

                      2. Harvey, Bruce J., YHWH Elohim: A Survey of Occurrences in
                      the Leningrad Codex and their Corresponding Septuagintal
                      Renderings (LHBOTS 537; Hebrew Bible and its Versions 6;
                      London/New York: T&T Clark, 2011). (Reviewed by Michael P.
                      Knowles).

                      3. Houtman, Alberdina and Harry Sysling, Alternative Targum
                      Traditions: The Use of Variant Readings for the Study in
                      Origin and History of Targum Jonathan (Studies in the
                      Aramaic Interpretation of Scripture, 9; Leiden: Brill,
                      2009). (Reviewed by William Tooman).

                      4. Hundley, Michael B., Keeping Heaven on Earth:
                      Safeguarding the Divine Presence in the Priestly Tabernacle
                      (FAT II, 50; Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2011). (Reviewed by
                      Mark K. George).

                      5. Kalimi, Isaac (ed.), New Perspectives on Ezra-Nehemiah:
                      History and Historiography, Text, Literature, and
                      Interpretation (Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns, 2012).
                      (Reviewed by Steven J. Schweitzer).

                      6. Kupfer, Christian, Mit Israel auf dem Weg durch die
                      Wüste: eine leseorientierte Exegese der Rebellionstexte in
                      Exodus 15:22–17:7 und Numeri 11:1–20:13 (OTS, 61;
                      Leiden: Brill, 2012). (Reviewed by Nathan MacDonald).

                      7. VanderKam, James C., The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Bible
                      (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2012). (Reviewed by Robert C.
                      Kashow).

                      8. Way, Kenneth C., Donkeys in the Biblical World: Ceremony
                      and Symbol (History, Archaeology, and Culture of the Levant,
                      2; Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns, 2011). (Reviewed by Gerald
                      A. Klingbeil).

                      9. Wood, Alice, Of Wings and Wheels: A Synthetic Study of
                      the Biblical Cherubim (BZAW, 385; Berlin and New York: de
                      Gruyter, 2008). (Reviewed by Michael Hundley).

                      To access the reviews directly please go to

                      http://www.jhsonline.org/reviews_vol.html


                      JHS is now offering hypertext/ hyperlinked versions of all
                      articles and reviews published from 1996 to 2009 (inclusive
                      of 2009). We are currently working to include versions of
                      the 2010/2011 articles and reviews.


                      Regards,

                      Christophe Nihan
                      University of Lausanne (Switzerland)
                      Associate General Editor, Journal of Hebrew Scriptures


                      ___________________________________________________________________

                      The printed version of volume 9 (2009) has been published.
                      For information please go to
                      http://www.gorgiaspress.com/bookshop/showproduct.aspx?ISBN=978-1-61143-004-2.
                      The printed version of volume 10 (2010) is currently in
                      print.

                      For information about the printed version of volume 8 (2008)
                      please go to
                      http://www.gorgiaspress.com/BOOKSHOP/pc-56678-10-ben-zvi-ehud-perspectives-on-hebrew-scriptures-v.aspx

                      For information about the other printed volumes of the
                      journal, please go to:
                      http://www.gorgiaspress.com/BOOKSHOP/pc-56678-10-ben-zvi-ehud-perspectives-on-hebrew-scriptures-v.aspx

                      The Logos version of vol. 9 has been released. For
                      information please go to
                      http://www.logos.com/product/8766/journal-of-hebrew-scriptures-vol-9
                      For information about the Logos version of vols. 1-8, please
                      go to http://www.logos.com/products/details/4336.

                      the LOGOS version of JHS vols 10-11 is about to be released;
                      for information
                      http://www.logos.com/product/24530/journal-of-hebrew-scriptures-vols-10-11
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