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Re: SV: [ANE-2] Gilgamesh

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  • janegc@comcast.net
    Ulysses survives as long as he does because he has so much of the trickster in him, I think. He s not really like the traditional epic hero. That he will
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 2, 2006
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      Ulysses survives as long as he does because he has so much of the trickster in him, I think. He's not really like the traditional epic hero. That he will someday die is not particular to his being a hero, anyway.

      A one line synopsis of Gilgamesh could be, IMHO, "Everyone dies, so grow up why don't you." Is his death connected with being a hero or just being human?

      Gilgamesh and Ulysses don't really fit the traditional hero mold.

      Jane Cates

      -------------- Original message ----------------------
      From: "Niels Peter Lemche" <npl@...>





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Marc Cooper
      Yes, Gilgamesh dies, but all people do. Griffin seems to think that Gilgamesh s failure to win immortality leads to his death. Another way to look at it is
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 2, 2006
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        Yes, Gilgamesh dies, but all people do. Griffin seems to think that
        Gilgamesh's failure to win immortality leads to his death. Another
        way to look at it is that Gilgamesh's failure leads to wisdom. In
        that sense Gilgamesh is not a tragedy but a triumph.

        PS

        I didn't think about it when we were talking about cross cultural
        marriages, but in one of the Sumerian compositions, Gilgamesh gives
        his sisters in marriage to Huwawa. It didn't work out though. It
        wasn't the cultural differences, it was Enkidu's knife.

        Marc Cooper
        Missouri State University

        --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, "Niels Peter Lemche" <npl@...> wrote:
        >
        > Could it be that the reviewer is under Greek influence, the tragic
        end of the heroes? Think of the Homeric tradition, the greatest hero
        is killed by the most outspoken anti-hero. Does it has to do with
        contemporary sentiments, or is it an imbedded part of heroism?
        >
        > I have planned together with Tom Thompson to do a volume about
        this, noting the different kinds of heroes around. The tragic hero
        is the bow-wow hero like Samson. The anti-hero is the trickster,
        like Jakob.
        >
        > We intend when we get the time necessary to trace the theme
        through ANE literature.
        >
        > So Gilgamesh has a kind of tragic conclusion: the hero will die in
        spite of his heroism. Same to Samson, same to Achilles.
        >
        > NPLemche
      • Graham Hagens
        ... the heroes? Think of ... anti-hero. Does it ... the different kinds ... anti-hero is the ... ... the hero will have to journey again, before at last he is
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 2, 2006
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          Niels Peter Lemche wrote March 02:

          >Could it be that the reviewer is under Greek influence, the tragic end of
          the heroes? Think of
          >the Homeric tradition, the greatest hero is killed by the most outspoken
          anti-hero. Does it
          >s to do with contemporary sentiments, or is it an imbedded part of heroism?

          > have planned together with Tom Thompson to do a volume about this, noting
          the different kinds
          >f heroes around. The tragic hero is the bow-wow hero like Samson. The
          anti-hero is the
          >trickster, like Jakob.

          ...>the hero will have to journey again, before at last he is released by a
          gentle death.

          And don't forget Solon. 'Let no man be called happy who has not died well.'

          Graham Hagens
          Hamilton, ON
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