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Re: [ANE-2] Pythagoras mustard

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  • Jeffrey B. Gibson
    ... Wait ... let me get my cape on ... And where s that phone booth when you need one! I ll be happy to look if you give me the Greek word for mustard --
    Message 1 of 10 , Oct 14, 2006
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      George F Somsel wrote:

      > That sounds like a good job for Jeffrey Gibson and the TLG.
      >

      Wait ... let me get my cape on ... And where's that phone booth when you
      need one!

      I'll be happy to look if you give me the Greek word for "mustard" --
      which I admit I do not know off the top of my head.

      Jeffrey
      --
      Jeffrey B. Gibson, D.Phil. (Oxon)
      1500 W. Pratt Blvd.
      Chicago, Illinois
      e-mail jgibson000@...
    • Jean-Fabrice Nardelli
      Mustard, Greek (to) sinapi, -eôs. I hope it helps. J.-F.N. ... From: Jeffrey B. Gibson To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sunday, October 15, 2006 1:34 AM
      Message 2 of 10 , Oct 14, 2006
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        Mustard, Greek (to) sinapi, -eôs. I hope it helps.

        J.-F.N.

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Jeffrey B. Gibson
        To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, October 15, 2006 1:34 AM
        Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Pythagoras mustard




        George F Somsel wrote:

        > That sounds like a good job for Jeffrey Gibson and the TLG.
        >

        Wait ... let me get my cape on ... And where's that phone booth when you
        need one!

        I'll be happy to look if you give me the Greek word for "mustard" --
        which I admit I do not know off the top of my head.

        Jeffrey
        --
        Jeffrey B. Gibson, D.Phil. (Oxon)
        1500 W. Pratt Blvd.
        Chicago, Illinois
        e-mail jgibson000@...





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • George F Somsel
        It could either be NAPU or SINAPI. george gfsomsel ... From: Jeffrey B. Gibson To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com Sent: Saturday, October 14,
        Message 3 of 10 , Oct 14, 2006
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          It could either be NAPU or SINAPI.

          george
          gfsomsel
          _________



          ----- Original Message ----
          From: Jeffrey B. Gibson <jgibson000@...>
          To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, October 14, 2006 7:34:14 PM
          Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Pythagoras mustard



          George F Somsel wrote:

          > That sounds like a good job for Jeffrey Gibson and the TLG.
          >

          Wait ... let me get my cape on ... And where's that phone booth when you
          need one!

          I'll be happy to look if you give me the Greek word for "mustard" --
          which I admit I do not know off the top of my head.

          Jeffrey
          --
          Jeffrey B. Gibson, D.Phil. (Oxon)
          1500 W. Pratt Blvd.
          Chicago, Illinois
          e-mail jgibson000@comcast. net






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • David Hall
          From a secondary quote, Pliny was reported as writing mustard was used as a cure for scorpion and serpent bites, toothaches, and other remedies. Swahn seems to
          Message 4 of 10 , Oct 14, 2006
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            From a secondary quote, Pliny was reported as writing mustard was used as a cure for scorpion and serpent bites, toothaches, and other remedies.

            Swahn seems to have published Pythagoras was an author of the remedy of using mustard to cure scorpion stings; Swahn, JO The Lore of Spices. Crescent Books.

            Pythagoras' writings are not extant, they were quoted or misquoted in other works.

            The brown mustard seed (brassica nigra) grew to three feet in northern climates such as Europe and North America, yet was reported as growing to a 10-15 foot maximum in the warmer climates of Israel and Egypt, but more commonly shorter than the maximum.

            David Q. Hall
            dqhall@...






            JPvdGiessen <janpieter@...> wrote:
            Hi all,

            Can anybody tell me where Pythagoras mentioned mustard as treatment
            for scorpion bites.

            Jan Pieter van de Giessen
            Blog: http://bijbelaantekeningen.blogspot.com/






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • RUSSELLGMIRKIN@aol.com
            Try Pliny, Natural History 20.87. Mustard, of which we have mentioned three different kinds, when speaking of the garden herbs, is ranked by Pythagoras
            Message 5 of 10 , Oct 14, 2006
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              Try Pliny, Natural History 20.87. "Mustard, of which we have mentioned
              three different kinds, when speaking of the garden herbs, is ranked by Pythagoras
              among the very first of those plants the pungency of which mounts upwards;
              for there is none to be found more penetrating to the brain and nostrils.
              Pounded with vinegar, mustard is employed as a liniment for the stings of
              serpents and scorpions, and it effectually neutralizes the poisonous properties of
              fungi." [John Bostock, ed., 1955]

              Best regards,
              Russell Gmirkin

              Hi all,

              Can anybody tell me where Pythagoras mentioned mustard as treatment
              for scorpion bites.

              Jan Pieter van de Giessen
              Blog: http://bijbelaantekeningen.blogspot.com/







              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • JPvdGiessen
              Thank you all very much, indeed it was Pliny who wrote about this. And for the botanical add-on s from David Hall, I still have a photo of you between the
              Message 6 of 10 , Oct 15, 2006
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                Thank you all very much, indeed it was Pliny who wrote about this. And
                for the botanical "add-on's" from David Hall, I still have a photo of
                you between the mustard on my blog
                (http://bijbelaantekeningen.blogspot.com/2006/06/mosterdplant.html)

                Jan Pieter van de Giessen
                Blog: http://bijbelaantekeningen.blogspot.com


                --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, RUSSELLGMIRKIN@... wrote:
                >
                >
                > Try Pliny, Natural History 20.87. "Mustard, of which we have mentioned
                > three different kinds, when speaking of the garden herbs, is ranked by Pythagoras
                > among the very first of those plants the pungency of which mounts upwards;
                > for there is none to be found more penetrating to the brain and nostrils.
                > Pounded with vinegar, mustard is employed as a liniment for the stings of
                > serpents and scorpions, and it effectually neutralizes the poisonous properties of
                > fungi." [John Bostock, ed., 1955]
                >
                > Best regards,
                > Russell Gmirkin
                >
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