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Logos Bible Software and Society of Biblical Literature Technology Paper Awards

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  • cejo@uchicago.edu
    Logos Bible Software and Society of Biblical Literature Technology Paper Awards Deadline 1 May 2007 Introduction Logos Bible Software and the Society of
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 30, 2006
      Logos Bible Software and Society of Biblical Literature Technology Paper Awards

      Deadline 1 May 2007

      Introduction
      Logos Bible Software and the Society of Biblical Literature announce two sets of awards for papers
      that creatively use technology in exploring questions of grammar and syntax in biblical studies:
      one focusing on the Hebrew Bible, the other on the Greek New Testament. The contests are open to
      all those engaged in the study of those disciplines, and prizes will be awarded in both areas for
      student and faculty/professional categories. A total of twelve awards will be given.

      Goal of the Awards
      The goal of these jointly sponsored essay contests is to foster creative biblical scholarship in
      the use of technology and to expand our understanding of the grammar and syntax of the biblical
      Hebrew and Greek texts. Submitters will make significant use of the syntactically tagged databases
      produced by Logos Bible Software. For the Hebrew Bible, students must utilize the Andersen-Forbes
      Analyzed Text and the Phrase-Marker Analysis visualizations. For the Greek New Testament, students
      must utilize the OpenText.org Syntactically Analyzed Greek New Testament and/or the Lexham
      Syntactic Greek New Testament. The Review Panels seek contributions to the understanding of
      biblical Hebrew and Greek grammar and syntax through the use of these tools. To that end, papers
      may focus on a passage or on a grammatical-syntactical phenomenon over a larger biblical corpus.
      Tutorials on the search interfaces or syntax graph visualizations are not appropriate, and papers
      should not focus on philology and morphology, except as they relate to a larger grammatical-
      syntactical issue.

      Although it is not required, papers may include discussion of the relevance of the findings for
      teaching or practical applications such as homiletics. Papers must be an original contribution and
      not previously published.

      For more information see:
      http://www.sbl-site.org/TechResearch/TechResearch_LogosSBLawards.aspx

      -Chuck Jones-
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