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Re: Egyptian Camel SUMERIAN TEXT 3rd dynasty Ur traded with Bahrain and Oman

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  • Bea Hopkinson
    To David: One small point about the slot on the lamb-like camel , you ... It is the habit of potters, as they say, to leather-dry their pottery before
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 1, 2006
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      To David:

      One small point about the slot on the lamb-like 'camel' , you
      say:
      >on its back may have been used to attach a hump and load, yet it
      >may have also been a hole to prevent the solid clay from exploding in the
      >kiln.
      >
      It is the habit of potters, as they say, to "leather-dry" their
      pottery before firing so that it does not explode. I study prehistoric
      industrial pottery used in salt-making known as Briquetage which, unlike
      ordinary dense pottery is porous. My own experiments showed that
      these ceramics could be fired without first drying, though I found
      sceptical potters remained unconvinced until I demonstrated first hand
      that they would not explode during firing!


      Beatrice Hopkinson,
      Hon. Secretary Los Angeles Branch, Oxford University Society,
      President, Droitwich Brine Springs and Archaeological Trust
      Board, Archaeological Society of America,
      >
      > >To Danelka:
      > >
      > > Thanks for the reference, I pulled Kitchen's text from my
      shelf. In my
      >
      >
      > >
      > > One of the "camel" sculptures Kitchen listed as evidence
      appeared like a
      > >lamb. It did not have the long neck of the camel. He indicated
      the slot
      > >on its back may have been used to attach a hump and load, yet it
      may have
      > >also been a hole to prevent the solid clay from exploding in the
      kiln,
      > >similar to the way people cut slots in potatoes before putting
      them in the
      > >oven to prevent explosions.
      > >
      >> >
      >
      > >
      > > David Q. Hall
      > > dqhall@...
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
    • David Hall
      Thankyou Bea. I would be more convinced the slot on the animal s back was used too attach a separate hump and load if the hump and load would have been
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 2, 2006
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        Thankyou Bea.

        I would be more convinced the slot on the animal's back was used too attach a separate hump and load if the hump and load would have been included in the exhibit. The alleged missing hump might not have been attached in the first place as the object might have exploded in the kiln if it were too large and thick.

        I recalled a high school pottery class where we were warned to make thick objects hollow, lest they explode. In spite of the warning one or more pieces exploded in the kiln causing damage to numerous art pieces.

        David Q. Hall

        Bea Hopkinson <beahopkinson@...> wrote:
        To David:

        One small point about the slot on the lamb-like 'camel' , you
        say:
        >on its back may have been used to attach a hump and load, yet it
        >may have also been a hole to prevent the solid clay from exploding in the
        >kiln.
        >
        It is the habit of potters, as they say, to "leather-dry" their
        pottery before firing so that it does not explode. I study prehistoric
        industrial pottery used in salt-making known as Briquetage which, unlike
        ordinary dense pottery is porous. My own experiments showed that
        these ceramics could be fired without first drying, though I found
        sceptical potters remained unconvinced until I demonstrated first hand
        that they would not explode during firing!

        Beatrice Hopkinson,
        Hon. Secretary Los Angeles Branch, Oxford University Society,
        President, Droitwich Brine Springs and Archaeological Trust
        Board, Archaeological Society of America,
        >
        > >To Danelka:
        > >
        > > Thanks for the reference, I pulled Kitchen's text from my
        shelf. In my
        >
        >
        > >
        > > One of the "camel" sculptures Kitchen listed as evidence
        appeared like a
        > >lamb. It did not have the long neck of the camel. He indicated
        the slot
        > >on its back may have been used to attach a hump and load, yet it
        may have
        > >also been a hole to prevent the solid clay from exploding in the
        kiln,
        > >similar to the way people cut slots in potatoes before putting
        them in the
        > >oven to prevent explosions.
        > >
        >> >
        >
        > >
        > > David Q. Hall
        > > dqhall@...
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Bea Hopkinson
        David, It s difficult to speculate on something that doesn t exist, but another thought is that the piece WAS hollow and the slot was meant to allow steam from
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 2, 2006
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          David,

          It's difficult to speculate on something that doesn't exist, but
          another
          thought is that the piece WAS hollow and the slot was meant to allow steam
          from the clay to escape as well as for something to be inserted.
          Depending on
          the size of the slot it could have been a 'money' box...for tokens that
          is :)

          Beatrice Hopkinson
          Hon. Secretary Los Angeles Branch, Oxford University Society,
          President, Droitwich Brine Springs and Archaeological Trust
          Board, Archaeological Society of America, Los Angeles

          >Thankyou Bea.
          >
          >> I would be more convinced the slot on the animal's back was used too
          >>attach a separate hump and load if the hump and load would have been
          >>included in the exhibit. The alleged missing hump might not have been
          >>attached in the first place as the object might have exploded in the kiln
          >>if it were too large and thick.
          >
          > I recalled a high school pottery class where we were warned to make
          >thick objects hollow, lest they explode. In spite of the warning one or
          >more pieces exploded in the kiln causing damage to numerous art pieces.
          >
          > David Q. Hall


          >
          >Bea Hopkinson <beahopkinson@...> wrote:
          > To David:
          >
          >One small point about the slot on the lamb-like 'camel' , you
          >say:
          >>on its back may have been used to attach a hump and load, yet it
          >>may have also been a hole to prevent the solid clay from exploding in the
          >>kiln.
          >>
          >It is the habit of potters, as they say, to "leather-dry" their
          >pottery before firing so that it does not explode. I study prehistoric
          >industrial pottery used in salt-making known as Briquetage which, unlike
          >ordinary dense pottery is porous. My own experiments showed that
          >these ceramics could be fired without first drying, though I found
          >sceptical potters remained unconvinced until I demonstrated first hand
          >that they would not explode during firing!
          >
          >Beatrice Hopkinson,
          >Hon. Secretary Los Angeles Branch, Oxford University Society,
          >President, Droitwich Brine Springs and Archaeological Trust
          >Board, Archaeological Society of America,
          >>
          >> >To Danelka:
          >> >
          >> > Thanks for the reference, I pulled Kitchen's text from my
          >shelf. In my
          >>
          >>
          >> >
          >> > One of the "camel" sculptures Kitchen listed as evidence
          >appeared like a
          >> >lamb. It did not have the long neck of the camel. He indicated
          >the slot
          >> >on its back may have been used to attach a hump and load, yet it
          >may have
          >> >also been a hole to prevent the solid clay from exploding in the
          >kiln,
          >> >similar to the way people cut slots in potatoes before putting
          >them in the
          >> >oven to prevent explosions.
          >> >
          >>> >
          >>
          >> >
          >> > David Q. Hall
          >> > dqhall@...
          >> >
          >> >
          >> >
          >>
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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