Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Old Shells Suggest Early Human Adornment

Expand Messages
  • febraun
    Here is some interesting and rather startling information on early humans from Skhul Cave, Israel. http://www.nytimes.com/2006/06/23/science/23shell.html --
    Message 1 of 11 , Jun 23, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Here is some interesting and rather startling information on early
      humans from Skhul Cave, Israel.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2006/06/23/science/23shell.html

      --
      Eliot Braun, Ph D
      PO Box 21 (Rehov Ha-oren 12)
      Har Adar, Zafon Yehuda 90836
      ISRAEL
      Tel. 972-2-5345687
    • Michael Balter
      And here is my story accompanying the paper in Science: http://www.michaelbalter.com/news.php#hominid (first item) best wishes, Michael Balter
      Message 2 of 11 , Jun 24, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        And here is my story accompanying the paper in Science:

        http://www.michaelbalter.com/news.php#hominid (first item)

        best wishes, Michael Balter


        http://www.michaelbalter.com


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jack Kilmon
        ... From: Michael Balter To: Sent: Saturday, June 24, 2006 7:58 AM Subject: [ANE-2] Re: Old Shells Suggest Early
        Message 3 of 11 , Jun 24, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Michael Balter" <mbalter@...>
          To: <ANE-2@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Saturday, June 24, 2006 7:58 AM
          Subject: [ANE-2] Re: Old Shells Suggest Early Human Adornment


          > And here is my story accompanying the paper in Science:
          >
          > http://www.michaelbalter.com/news.php#hominid (first item)
          >
          > best wishes, Michael Balter


          Thanks for the article, Mike. Although these may be the earliest symbolic
          adornments yet discovered, I think it almost a certainty that the very
          earliest hominids wore "prettys" in some fashion. I am reminded of the
          Makapansgat cobble that some Australopithecine thought was unique enough to
          carry it some distance back to the cave. It could not have been too long
          after early Homo (probably erectus) began processing hides for clothing
          that wearing "prettys" would have developed...perhaps for mating rituals. I
          predict that even earlier beads will be found since awls, necessary tools
          for making beads or boring shells go back pre-Acheulian.

          Jack Kilmon
        • hfeltham@bigpond.net.au
          As the Maori Assistan Director of Te Papa in Wellington said some years ago, The first art gallery wall was the human chest Heleanor Feltham
          Message 4 of 11 , Jun 24, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            As the Maori Assistan Director of Te Papa in Wellington said some years ago, 'The first art gallery wall was the human chest'

            Heleanor Feltham

            -- Jack Kilmon <jkilmon@...> wrote:
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: "Michael Balter" <mbalter@...>
            > To: <ANE-2@yahoogroups.com>
            > Sent: Saturday, June 24, 2006 7:58 AM
            > Subject: [ANE-2] Re: Old Shells Suggest Early Human Adornment
            >
            >
            > > And here is my story accompanying the paper in Science:
            > >
            > > http://www.michaelbalter.com/news.php#hominid (first item)
            > >
            > > best wishes, Michael Balter
            >
            >
            > Thanks for the article, Mike. Although these may be the earliest symbolic
            > adornments yet discovered, I think it almost a certainty that the very
            > earliest hominids wore "prettys" in some fashion. I am reminded of the
            > Makapansgat cobble that some Australopithecine thought was unique enough to
            > carry it some distance back to the cave. It could not have been too long
            > after early Homo (probably erectus) began processing hides for clothing
            > that wearing "prettys" would have developed...perhaps for mating rituals. I
            > predict that even earlier beads will be found since awls, necessary tools
            > for making beads or boring shells go back pre-Acheulian.
            >
            > Jack Kilmon
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • funhistory
            ... Michael, your article says: Recent dating of the Skhul burials has shown that they are 100,000 to 135,000 years old. Could you please provide a
            Message 5 of 11 , Jun 25, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              > http://www.michaelbalter.com/news.php#hominid (first item)
              > best wishes, Michael Balter

              Michael, your article says: "Recent dating of the Skhul burials has
              shown that they are 100,000 to 135,000 years old."

              Could you please provide a reference that explains the dating method
              used to obtain this 35k-year range? Or you could give us a brief
              overview of the methodology here--whichever is more convenient for
              you. Thanks!
              George Michael Grena, II
              Redondo Beach, CA

              P.S. As my browser had a difficult time following the original link on
              your news page, here's a direct link:

              http://www.michaelbalter.com/HominidHighlights/06_24_2006|Old_beads_sugg
              est_early_use_of_symbols.php

              [Moderator note: Yahoo stops parsing an URL at the "|" sign, hence such URLs will not work in Yahoo Groups. To use these URLs, copy them into your browser's URL window. -MC]
            • Bea Hopkinson
              jkilmon@historian.net ... And don t forget painting the body to accompany one ritual or another :) Beatrice Hopkinson
              Message 6 of 11 , Jun 25, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                jkilmon@...

                >
                >----- Original Message -----
                >From: "Michael Balter" <mbalter@...>
                >To: <ANE-2@yahoogroups.com>
                >Sent: Saturday, June 24, 2006 7:58 AM
                >Subject: [ANE-2] Re: Old Shells Suggest Early Human Adornment
                >
                >
                >> And here is my story accompanying the paper in Science:
                >>
                >> http://www.michaelbalter.com/news.php#hominid (first item)
                >>
                >> best wishes, Michael Balter
                >
                >
                >Thanks for the article, Mike. Although these may be the earliest symbolic
                >adornments yet discovered, I think it almost a certainty that the very
                >earliest hominids wore "prettys" in some fashion. I am reminded of the
                >Makapansgat cobble that some Australopithecine thought was unique enough to
                >carry it some distance back to the cave. It could not have been too long
                >after early Homo (probably erectus) began processing hides for clothing
                >that wearing "prettys" would have developed...perhaps for mating rituals. I
                >predict that even earlier beads will be found since awls, necessary tools
                >for making beads or boring shells go back pre-Acheulian.
                >
                >Jack Kilmon
                >
                And don't forget painting the body to accompany one ritual or
                another :)

                Beatrice Hopkinson
                >
                >
              • richard godwin
                Excerpted from NY Times, the first of the article. Carbon 14 dating, I suspect, since shells are a form of life. Richard Godwin Archaeologists say they have
                Message 7 of 11 , Jun 25, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  Excerpted from NY Times, the first of the article. Carbon 14 dating, I
                  suspect, since shells are a form of life.

                  Richard Godwin



                  "Archaeologists say they have found evidence that in one respect people were
                  behaving like thoroughly modern humans as early as 100,000 years ago: they
                  were apparently decorating themselves with a kind of status-defining
                  jewelry - the earliest known shell necklaces.

                  If this interpretation is correct, it means that human self-adornment,
                  considered a manifestation of symbolic thinking, was practiced at least
                  25,000 years earlier than previously thought.

                  An international team of archaeologists, writing today in the journal
                  Science, reported its analysis of small shells with distinctive perforations
                  that appeared to have been strung together as ornamental beads. Chemical
                  study showed that the two shells from the Skhul rock shelter in Israel were
                  more than 100,000 years old, and the single shell from Oued Djebbana, in
                  Algeria, was about 90,000 years old."



                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "funhistory" <yahoo-ane-2@...>
                  To: <ANE-2@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Sunday, June 25, 2006 9:04 AM
                  Subject: [ANE-2] Re: Old Shells Suggest Early Human Adornment


                  >> http://www.michaelbalter.com/news.php#hominid (first item)
                  >> best wishes, Michael Balter
                  >
                  > Michael, your article says: "Recent dating of the Skhul burials has
                  > shown that they are 100,000 to 135,000 years old."
                  >
                  > Could you please provide a reference that explains the dating method
                  > used to obtain this 35k-year range? Or you could give us a brief
                  > overview of the methodology here--whichever is more convenient for
                  > you. Thanks!
                • victor
                  Excuse my ignorance, but although shell is produced by living organisms is it in itself organic? Victor Hurowitz BGU Beer-Sheva, Israel ... From:
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jun 25, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Excuse my ignorance, but although shell is produced by living organisms is
                    it in itself organic?
                    Victor Hurowitz
                    BGU Beer-Sheva, Israel

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                    richard godwin
                    Sent: Monday, June 26, 2006 3:55 AM
                    To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Re: Old Shells Suggest Early Human Adornment

                    Excerpted from NY Times, the first of the article. Carbon 14 dating, I
                    suspect, since shells are a form of life.

                    Richard Godwin



                    "Archaeologists say they have found evidence that in one respect people were

                    behaving like thoroughly modern humans as early as 100,000 years ago: they
                    were apparently decorating themselves with a kind of status-defining
                    jewelry - the earliest known shell necklaces.

                    If this interpretation is correct, it means that human self-adornment,
                    considered a manifestation of symbolic thinking, was practiced at least
                    25,000 years earlier than previously thought.

                    An international team of archaeologists, writing today in the journal
                    Science, reported its analysis of small shells with distinctive perforations

                    that appeared to have been strung together as ornamental beads. Chemical
                    study showed that the two shells from the Skhul rock shelter in Israel were
                    more than 100,000 years old, and the single shell from Oued Djebbana, in
                    Algeria, was about 90,000 years old."



                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "funhistory" <yahoo-ane-2@...>
                    To: <ANE-2@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Sunday, June 25, 2006 9:04 AM
                    Subject: [ANE-2] Re: Old Shells Suggest Early Human Adornment


                    >> http://www.michaelbalter.com/news.php#hominid (first item)
                    >> best wishes, Michael Balter
                    >
                    > Michael, your article says: "Recent dating of the Skhul burials has
                    > shown that they are 100,000 to 135,000 years old."
                    >
                    > Could you please provide a reference that explains the dating method
                    > used to obtain this 35k-year range? Or you could give us a brief
                    > overview of the methodology here--whichever is more convenient for
                    > you. Thanks!







                    Yahoo! Groups Links
                  • Robert Whiting
                    ... No, C-14 dating is useless at this time depth. The practical upper limit of C-14 dating is about 50,000 years. I have suggested
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jun 26, 2006
                    • 0 Attachment
                      On Sun, 25 Jun 2006, richard godwin wrote:

                      > Excerpted from NY Times, the first of the article. Carbon 14 dating, I
                      > suspect, since shells are a form of life.
                      >
                      > Richard Godwin

                      <snip of article excerpt>

                      No, C-14 dating is useless at this time depth. The practical upper limit
                      of C-14 dating is about 50,000 years. I have suggested before that for
                      information on the basis of dating reported in Science Magazine, one
                      should go to the Science Magazine article itself rather than news reports
                      based on the article. The original article is at
                      <http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/312/5781/1785>. Access
                      requires a subscription, but many universities have a subscription that is
                      available to local users when accessing the site from their university
                      computers (or if they can log on with a university domain IP address
                      from their home computers).

                      Based on the article, the shells themselves are not dated but the dating
                      comes from the associated burial stratum. The shells have been associated
                      with the burial stratum through chemical analysis of the sediment adhering
                      to one of the shells.

                      With respect to dating, the article says:

                      Dates obtained for layer B from the use of electron spin resonance
                      (ESR), U-series analysis, and TL on mammalian fossils or burnt flint
                      range from about 43 to 134 ka (15-17), but recent ESR and U-series
                      analyses, including direct dating with both techniques of a molar from
                      the Skhul II skeleton, indicate ages between 100 and 135 ka (18).

                      TL = Thermo-luminescence. Note 18 refers to R. GrĂ¼n et al., J. Hum. Evol.
                      49, 316 (2005).


                      Bob Whiting
                      whiting@...
                    • Michael Balter
                      Bob is right, the dating was published in Journal of Human Evolution last year, Rainer Grun et al., and was based on uranium-series and electron spin resonance
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jun 26, 2006
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Bob is right, the dating was published in Journal of Human Evolution last year, Rainer Grun et al., and was based on uranium-series and electron spin resonance (ESR) dating of bones and teeth from the Skhul burials.

                        best, Michael Balter

                        http://www.michaelbalter.com




                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • richard godwin
                        I stand corrected. Thank you. Richard. ... From: Michael Balter To: Sent: Monday, June 26, 2006 11:32 AM
                        Message 11 of 11 , Jun 26, 2006
                        • 0 Attachment
                          I stand corrected. Thank you.

                          Richard.

                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: "Michael Balter" <mbalter@...>
                          To: <ANE-2@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Monday, June 26, 2006 11:32 AM
                          Subject: [ANE-2] Re: Old Shells Suggest Early Human Adornment


                          > Bob is right, the dating was published in Journal of Human Evolution last
                          > year, Rainer Grun et al., and was based on uranium-series and electron
                          > spin resonance (ESR) dating of bones and teeth from the Skhul burials.
                          >
                          > best, Michael Balter
                          >
                          > http://www.michaelbalter.com
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > --
                          > BEGIN-ANTISPAM-VOTING-LINKS
                          > ------------------------------------------------------
                          >
                          > Teach CanIt if this mail (ID 41702052) is spam:
                          > Spam: http://filter.rraz.net/b.php?c=s&i=41702052&m=ecfe0f429eb9
                          > Not spam: http://filter.rraz.net/b.php?c=n&i=41702052&m=ecfe0f429eb9
                          > Forget vote: http://filter.rraz.net/b.php?c=f&i=41702052&m=ecfe0f429eb9
                          > ------------------------------------------------------
                          > END-ANTISPAM-VOTING-LINKS
                          >
                          >
                        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.