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Contents of storage jars

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  • Brian Colless
    TEL KABRI (1700 BCE) http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/23/science/in-ruins-of-palace-a-wine-with-hints-of-cinnamon-and-top-notes-of-antiquity.html?_r=1& A
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 26, 2013
      TEL KABRI (1700 BCE)


       "A chemical analysis of residues left in the three-foot-tall jars detected organic traces of acids that are common components of all wine, as well as ingredients popular in ancient winemaking. These included honey, mint, cinnamon bark, juniper berries and resins used as a preservative. The recipe was similar to medicinal wines used for 2,000 years in ancient Egypt and probably tasted something like retsina or other resinous Greek wines today." John Noble Wilford

      Does this mean that we could determine which interpretation of the text on the Ophel pithos from Jerusalem is correct: wine or water?

      No acids or spices would mean it was a water jar?!


      Brian Colless
      Massey University, NZ

    • Raz Kletter
      Dear Brian, Surely not, because lack of residues is only negative evidence and does not mean that there was bo use of such matertials in origin. Raz Kletter
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 26, 2013
        Dear Brian,
        Surely not, because lack of residues is only negative evidence and does not mean that there was bo use of such matertials in origin.
        Raz Kletter


        2013/11/26 Brian Colless <briancolless@...>
         

        TEL KABRI (1700 BCE)


         "A chemical analysis of residues left in the three-foot-tall jars detected organic traces of acids that are common components of all wine, as well as ingredients popular in ancient winemaking. These included honey, mint, cinnamon bark, juniper berries and resins used as a preservative. The recipe was similar to medicinal wines used for 2,000 years in ancient Egypt and probably tasted something like retsina or other resinous Greek wines today." John Noble Wilford

        Does this mean that we could determine which interpretation of the text on the Ophel pithos from Jerusalem is correct: wine or water?

        No acids or spices would mean it was a water jar?!


        Brian Colless
        Massey University, NZ


      • David Hall
        During the Middle Bronze Age the Hyksos occupied Jericho as determined by a large number of Hyksos seals found in these strata by Garstang.  The occupants
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 27, 2013
          During the Middle Bronze Age the Hyksos occupied Jericho as determined by a large number of Hyksos seals found in these strata by Garstang.  The occupants used three foot storage jars to store grain in store rooms with the jar buried and the top of the jar slightly above grade.  Jars were also used to store beer or wine  (The Story of Jericho, J. Garstang, 1948, London).

          David Q. Hall
          Port Charlotte, FL





          On Tuesday, November 26, 2013 12:33 PM, Raz Kletter <kletterr@...> wrote:
           
          Dear Brian,
          Surely not, because lack of residues is only negative evidence and does not mean that there was bo use of such matertials in origin.
          Raz Kletter


          2013/11/26 Brian Colless <briancolless@...>
           
          TEL KABRI (1700 BCE)


           "A chemical analysis of residues left in the three-foot-tall jars detected organic traces of acids that are common components of all wine, as well as ingredients popular in ancient winemaking. These included honey, mint, cinnamon bark, juniper berries and resins used as a preservative. The recipe was similar to medicinal wines used for 2,000 years in ancient Egypt and probably tasted something like retsina or other resinous Greek wines today." John Noble Wilford
          Does this mean that we could determine which interpretation of the text on the Ophel pithos from Jerusalem is correct: wine or water?

          No acids or spices would mean it was a water jar?!


          Brian Colless
          Massey University, NZ




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